WWYD.......Where would u go ..school related updated 12/12 page 10

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by cntrygal, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. Mkrop

    Mkrop <font color=coral>I just cant go on demand<br><fon

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    :thumbsup2 Very costly! Although I believe a few like Agnes Irwin and Shipley (I think that is coed) are very expensive but great schools and nondenominational.

    So I agree with the other poster, we dont know the finances, so unless you think your DD is going to get a scholarship than you might want to look into bigger public schools. Or if you do want her to sit for some scholarship entrance exams, you need to act soon, some of those windows may have closed. I know the school my son goes to (Catholic all boys prep) has already had their exams for 8th graders.
     
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  3. crazyme5kids

    crazyme5kids DIS Veteran

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    Here is the info the OP might need if she decides to investigate the NYC specialized schools. OP, as you can see, you would have to establish residency before your daughter would be allowed to take the test.

    Non-resident

    Non-Resident Enrollment
    If you are planning to move to New York City, you do not need to apply for non-resident enrollment. You can register your child for school after you establish residency. For information about registration for new students, visit our New Students page.

    If you live outside of New York City and would like send your child to a New York City school, you must submit a Non-Resident Application. The deadline to submit a non-resident enrollment application for the 2012-13 school year was Friday, August 31.

    Application decisions are made in September. The New York City Department of Education must accommodate all resident students before enrolling non-residents.

    ***

    For more information about non-resident enrollment, please read the Chancellor's Regulation on Non-Resident Enrollment.

    Tuition Rates
    Non-resident students must pay tuition based on the rates set each year by the State Education Department.

    The 2010-11 provisional rates are below.

    Student Grade Level

    General Education

    Special Education

    Grades K-6

    $5,672

    $29,506

    Grades 7-12

    $6,016

    $29,850

    Non-resident students are not eligible to attend and may not apply to attend specialized schools, screened/selective schools or programs, gifted and talented programs, or pre-Kindergarten programs.

    Specialized High School Admissions Test
    A student cannot take the Specialized High School Admissions Test until he or she becomes a New York City resident. The test is administered just before school begins for ninth and tenth graders who are new to the city; new residents can take the test at that time.

    Key Documents
    Chancellor's Regulation on Non-Resident Enrollment
    > more
     
  4. DopeyDame

    DopeyDame DIS Veteran

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    Wow... I never thought I'd see those school names on the Dis Board! I think you and I grew up very close to each other...
     
  5. Tigger&Belle

    Tigger&Belle <font color=blue>I'm the good girl on the DIS<br><

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    Exactly. I am all for asking the DIS all kinds of questions and asking this one is not an issue, however how could we find the perfect school for your daughter, not knowing so much information. And even if we knew it, I'm not so sure someone who doesn't know her could figure it out.

    OP For starters, what type of job do you do for a living?

    What is your daughter's IQ?

    Are there financial resources available to send your daughter to any school?

    If not, are you counting on scholarships?

    Do you have savings or some source of cash to cover the thousands of dollars it costs to move?
     
  6. Mkrop

    Mkrop <font color=coral>I just cant go on demand<br><fon

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    Just know the names, dont know anyone that goes there.

    Just started invstigating all the Catholic schools when DS15 was looking last year. We do have a ton in this area though, from Catholic, to Episcopal, to Quaker, to the ones mentioned above.

    There is some real money out this way, too bad we dont have any of it!

    Delco girl!

    Now living further west ;)
     
  7. Soben

    Soben Mouseketeer

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    It sounds like your current school is really dropping the ball and setting your DD adrift.

    Some thoughts:
    If you just moved to one of many major metropolitan areas you would be much better off. She would get honors classes/AP, she could be tracked into classes with bright kids. She would have lots of extracurricular activities to choose from.

    It seems like you're going to be a little behind on applying to elite HS. If that's what you really want, and since she's already ahead, maybe have her redo 8th grade (with geometry, French II, etc) to give you an opportunity to research and apply to those schools.

    Maybe look into online classes in things she likes, Anatomy and Chem, that will help her with her chosen career. She could look for a mentor too to talk about her plans.

    I would totally want out of that school district. I don't think you really need to get to the best school in the country to see a vast improvement.

    For the love of all that's good, don't let her suggest pop quizzes! No one appreciates that, even if she ends up in gifted classes.

    Good luck!
     
  8. badblackpug

    badblackpug <font color=blue>If you knew her you would be shoc

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    I initially thought of Agnes Irwin, though it is a day school, but the OP said she would move. I thing AI is about $40,000 a year. I have a friend that went to the Hun School in Princeton, though I am sure that is even more.

    My oldest daughter went to Friends from K-2nd, but we decided that it would be cheaper over all to actually move into a district with good public schools rather than pay Friends tuition for 2 kids. (and now we have 4 :faint:) When we were choosing schools for the oldest, as we didn't want to send her to Phila public, most of the private schools are religiously affiliated. The only one whose philosophy we could get behind was Friends. The Friends run excellent schools and offer excellent educational opportunities, but they are expensive. Like I said, it was actually cheaper in the long run to move. We are fortunate, though, that we have transplant-able jobs. I don't know what the OP does so I don't know if moving is really an option. Times are tough, jobs aren't easy to come by.

    I wouldn't count on scholarships or financial aid, though I know some schools do offer it., but I am sure it is not a guarantee.
     
  9. Caradana

    Caradana Miraculously, Refreshingly Marooned in Anonymity

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    In a case like this I would be taking her to test into boarding schools in Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Hampshire. Andover, Exeter, Middlesex, Deerfield, Taft, Choate, St. Paul's. They will tell you how gifted she is. If she's flying that far ahead, she will get scholarships. By the way you describe her, I think she would like the environment, and you wouldn't be too far away.
     
  10. cntrygal

    cntrygal DIS Veteran

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    Since some one else reopened the thread i will give an update.

    Her IQ and SAT scores were thru the roof. She was offered numberous opportunities thru John Hopkins.

    Things have not improved with the school and we are now to the point of talking to lawyers. The school has decided they dont want her there next yr and all they are willing to provide is a "minimun education" as stated by the school superitendent numberous times in our meeting last.week. They will do nothing else no more excelleration nothing.

    We have chosen another area to move too and have been in touch with the schoolndistrict and they are excited about having her attend there and our willing to adapt her education to her. The asst superitendent that inhave spoken to several times even said theybwere honered fornus to have choosen their school. We will be visiting the area over her winter break,nshe willnbe sitting in on classes. And i will be meeting with administration, guidance and special ed depts to work out a plan for her for the next 4 yrs.


    She is excited about the move and actually choose the area
     
  11. suemom2kay

    suemom2kay DIS Veteran

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    No energy to read the whole thread. Flight helicopters are staffed with Nurses and Paramedics; not nary a doctor.
     
  12. snowy76

    snowy76 <font color=blue>I do a panic dance<br><font color

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    Finally decided to weigh in - lawyers? Please let that go. The school may not be stellar but I'd assume it does follow the NYS Board of Regents guidelines for a diploma. Schools are NOT obligated to go any further - not here in NY.

    As for your reference to Johns Hopkins, if I'm inferring right, please be aware that they've had middle schoolers take the PSAT and/or SAT for decades. I did it in the late 80s. Do not assume that's unusual just because it's unusual in your community. They largely do it as a marketing tool for their summer and online programs. The year I took it (probably 7th grade?) we had dozens of kids from my school taking the exam (graduating class of about 500). As others have said, you may find that your DD is actually a relatively average kid among the honors/accelerated kids at a larger district. So in that regard, I'm glad to hear you're making plans to move - I'm sure a larger district will be a better fit for her with more opportunities and more kids she can relate to. Good luck!
     
  13. TLuvsD

    TLuvsD DIS Veteran

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    I haven't read the whole thread, but would like to suggest www. hoagies gifted.com as a resource. And the Johns Hopkins gifted program can be helpful, even if you do not participate in their summer programs, they were great about answering questions, etc.
     
  14. Kathi OD

    Kathi OD <marquee><font color=blue>The first person to repl

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    I only got to page 3, but there are definitely small, good public schools in upstate NY. One that comes to mind is Skaneateles. It's not on the huge side, but definitely offers more than 3 AP classes, would provide for a "regular" high school experience for DD, AND allow you to live in the kind of environment you prefer.
     
  15. cabanafrau

    cabanafrau DIS Veteran

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    You're open to moving anywhere and will do any type of job? School district doesn't want her there anymore -- because she's too bright & advanced? They're only willing to provide her the minimum education?

    Have said lawyers explained to you what the school district is obligated to do that they have not done? What a boneheaded district, pushing out their best and brightest. I wonder what their angle is?
     
  16. Nancyg56

    Nancyg56 DIS Veteran

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    It is probably financial. School systems are choosing between art, sports and security these days. Class sizes are getting larger and services are reduced. I have no idea what this district is doing and if they have met their obligations legally but I do know that it may be very difficult to justify the spending on one child that jeopardize resources to many.

    I don't now if that is the case but I am willing to bet that may be a great deal of the districts concern.

    I have a DGD in middle school and have always supported educational expenses through higher taxes. I have been watching our school system try to juggle rising costs and and a stagnant budget and honestly, they do a very good job. Our community is extremely supportive. I would have a very hard time if the arts and after school athletics were cut so that one child could have an extraordinary education. I do believe that parents are responsible for providing for their children if they require more than the school district can provide such as teh kind of classes this child needs.
     
  17. cabanafrau

    cabanafrau DIS Veteran

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    Think about the answers to the very first question I posed. How many people do you know that need to work to have a roof over their head and to feed their family would be in a position to say they could move anywhere and do any job? Do not include people who are independently wealthy & would not need to work to support said family. Makes zero sense.

    School districts do not ask their best and brightest to leave. They may not be able to grant parents' demands to bring in MIT, Carnegie Mellon, Stanford, Harvard and Princeton curriculum, complete with the professors to teach the material to a prodigy, but I'll be dipped if they'll ask a student to leave on the basis of over achievement. I think we'd be reading about that on the front page of the New York Times as quick as a lawyer could be retained & twittering the tale off into cyberspace.

    I don't disagree with your assessment of educational budgets these days, as a matter of fact I'm keenly aware of them as the parent of freshmen in both HS & college this year. I strongly question the tale we're being peddled here, with what can generously be described with curious grammar and spelling to boot.

    QUOTE=Nancyg56;47312879]It is probably financial. School systems are choosing between art, sports and security these days. Class sizes are getting larger and services are reduced. I have no idea what this district is doing and if they have met their obligations legally but I do know that it may be very difficult to justify the spending on one child that jeopardize resources to many.

    I don't now if that is the case but I am willing to bet that may be a great deal of the districts concern.

    I have a DGD in middle school and have always supported educational expenses through higher taxes. I have been watching our school system try to juggle rising costs and and a stagnant budget and honestly, they do a very good job. Our community is extremely supportive. I would have a very hard time if the arts and after school athletics were cut so that one child could have an extraordinary education. I do believe that parents are responsible for providing for their children if they require more than the school district can provide such as teh kind of classes this child needs.[/QUOTE]
     
  18. Hrhpd

    Hrhpd DIS Veteran

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    I have to agree. In the OP's first post she said her daughter was taking Algebra and Biology as an 8th grader, this was unusual, gifted for her school.

    In our district, not just school, Algebra and Biology are the standard courses, not the honors track. Algebra 1 is required for moving on from 8th grade.

    Honors track here would be advanced Geometry and the super honors track, where the kids go to the high school for courses would be Algebra 2 and above. The ones considered super bright kids like the OP's are the ones taking Calc 1 in 8th grade. Otherwise you are just amongst the bright/pushed kids, where you certainly would not be the only one on this track. In our middle school, there are so many kids taking Algebra 2 and above at the high school that they actually need a small bus to take them over there (class of 300).
     
  19. hsmamato2

    hsmamato2 <font color=magenta>Tink in Training-Good Girl,Bad

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    sounds to me like oP is in a small town with limited school opportunities:thumbsup2 it also sounds to me like she's got a bright motivated kid,who for whatever reason,feels like she has nothing in common with schoolmates. So what is wrong with OP asking for advice here,about possible school ideas?:confused3 I don't think OP ever said her kid was the ONLY smart kid in the world, she just believes she's bright enough to need more than she's getting now. I think that's good- I have a feeling that a lot of folks on these msg. boards feel that same way about their own offspring...:scratchin
    Op, another fun option might local community college courses, she can pick and choose,learn a lot,and see what else interests her!
    it can be a nice intro to learning,is close to home,and can help her see what she really likes when thinking about careers,etc.
    (FWIW,you don't have to have a 'gifted' kid to try courses at community college,just a bright kid who might be interested in more than the average classroom)
     
  20. hsmamato2

    hsmamato2 <font color=magenta>Tink in Training-Good Girl,Bad

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    agreed. my kids were well versed in basic algebra by 10-11 years old.
     
  21. wgeo

    wgeo That's the kind of day where you can't open your m

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    Hey OP,

    I just wanted to say sorry that so many people turned this thread into a discussion of whether they thought your DD was gifted or not. I think you have handled yourself very well especially considering many of the responses.

    It seems to me that the school system you are in is not a good fit for your DD, but you already know that, which is why you asked for any suggestions on better schools. People ask for recommendation for better schools all the time on here when they are moving to a new area, I'm not sure why you were attacked for doing so. I really hope that you find a place with more opportunities for your DD next year.
     

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