What would turn you off in a house for sale ?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by pyrxtc, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. pyrxtc

    pyrxtc <font color=deeppink>Married 10-5-02<br><font colo

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    It's an addition on the back of the house. The basement is a dug basement. No rooms down there.

    My Realtor thinks it will sell fast. I am on the lower end of the market with just under an acre of fully usable land. We are staying just above what we owe on our mortgage and it is the location that will sell the house first. I am less than 5 minutes to skiing and a 10 mile lake. I live in a big resort town and lots of house go over the $1 million mark. I am under $200k.

    butterflies are off the door. and that closet cannot have a door on it but it does have a curtain.
     
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  3. MotifNumberOne

    MotifNumberOne Mouseketeer

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    Is this the same 14 room house that you were trying to sell for $260k?
     
  4. Janepod

    Janepod <font color=royalblue>The new dinning plan is out.

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    Walking through a bathroom and then a linen room (what is that?) to get to the master bedroom would also turn me off. Can you make that room the playroom or something and set something else up as the master?
     
  5. tvguy

    tvguy Question anything the facts don't support.

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    Odors I would be concerned about, and structural integrity. Clutter is the person who is moving outs's problem, not mine.
    I would have a very hard time buying a 240 year old house. A house that age has the potential to be on the register of historic buildings, and that opens up a whole can of worms as far was what you can and cannot due.
    Around here, sturdy, well kept, ready to move 50 year old houses are often torn down just because it would be so expensive to upgrade the electrical, technology wiring, heating and air conditioning to current code and expectations.
    People 3 doors down from my mom bought a house built in 1932 and they have 10 feet left of the original house, because back then they weren't even putting them on foundations
     
  6. kirstenb1

    kirstenb1 DIS Veteran

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    It looks like the house is about 30 ft from the street. I'd either put up a little fence, or landscape the front yard with plenty of evergreen shrubs/perennials, to give a visual barrier. Maybe even just an arched arbor, then have boxwoods, or hollies lining either side of it.
     
  7. Bonnie40

    Bonnie40 <font color=red>Sweet tomatoes, yum<br><font color

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    We love a challenge and are still working on the house we bought 13 years ago.....it's an oldie that still had a wood cookstove in the kitchen! Soot covered the ceiling! I'd never seen anything like it, but we went into the purchase knowing we were doing a gut and redo.....lived like pioneers here for almost a year....but it was worth it!

    So....I'm not turned off by a dirty house.....just needs to have 'good bones' !

    When I start to get the itch to move and start over though, I look around and realize what a big job it would be to move and stop in my tracks! :)
     
  8. sunshinehighway

    sunshinehighway DIS Veteran

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    I guess its a totally different world in the Northeast. Many people look for old houses here.
     
  9. Bonnie40

    Bonnie40 <font color=red>Sweet tomatoes, yum<br><font color

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    That's what I was thinking too.....if allowed, I'm guessing most people would buy your house for the lot only - demolish the house and rebuild - especially if it's in a desirable location. But if there are rules for historic homes, a new owner would be limited in what they could do. It would definitely be a gut and redo though.....

    I would also agree that those pictures should come down..... ::yes::
     
  10. Bonnie40

    Bonnie40 <font color=red>Sweet tomatoes, yum<br><font color

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    This house has 14 rooms? ! You'd never know that from looking at it from the outside! :confused3
     
  11. MotifNumberOne

    MotifNumberOne Mouseketeer

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    Her words from a thread she made a few months ago.. looked it up to see if I remembered correctly.. yup

    http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=2828274&highlight=14
     
  12. Bonnie40

    Bonnie40 <font color=red>Sweet tomatoes, yum<br><font color

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    I'm not familiar with the backstory and didn't even bother looking at the old thread, but it's unfortunate that the bottom has dropped out of the price of this house.....to go from expecting $260,000 to less than $200,000 is rough. I'm not sure what the circumstances are, but I don't think I'd be moving if I didn't have to. That's quite a hit on the price.....
     
  13. ilovemk76

    ilovemk76 DIS Veteran

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    The garage looks terrible and it is only a single detached garage. A turnoff in a snowy area like NH.

    Tons of tiny rooms in a small house. Does the 1700 square feet include the master bedroom in the basement?

    I am confused by the hardwood floors. The room shown does not have hardwood. I expected really wide plank hardwood, based on the age of the house.

    The house has no curb appeal.

    The master bedroom and bath are small.

    I think your best chance is to complete painting outside and inside and lower the price to where a person would consider it as a fixer upper or a tear down.



    ETA: I see the master bedroom suite is on the back of the house. Do you really enter the master bedroom via the bathroom? That is the only door I see and it is where the "main house " is noted. If so, I would just walk out and keep looking.
     
  14. ilovemk76

    ilovemk76 DIS Veteran

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    Or the inside.;)
     
  15. badblackpug

    badblackpug <font color=blue>If you knew her you would be shoc

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    Unfortunately, there is a difference here. Keeping the time period integrity of the house in as far as style and decorating is one thing, but not upgrading things like kitchens and bathrooms is another. When I look at your pictures I really don't see anything that screams historical to me. If it is a 1700s house, 1950s kitchens and bathrooms don't give it a historical feel, they give it an outdated feel.

    I understand that total remodels of kitchens and baths is ridiculously expensive, and not something I would undertake if I was selling the house. At this point I would concentrate on the cosmetic.

    Paint. Light and neutral.
    Remove any extras or clutter.
    Make sure the kitchen counter tops are empty.
    Remove a lot of the pictures from the walls. Try not to keep any "personal" pictures. Stick with landscapes or still lifes
    Get rid of all the tchotckes.
    Take down any wallpaper and paint. Light and neutral.
    Refinish the floors. (hardwood is a big selling point)
    Paint the exterior, even if it's cold. (I painted a garage in January)
    Do a little landscaping, yard maintenance to increase curb appeal.

    If you are priced low enough and in a good neighborhood someone who is handy, or can work the cost of a lot of remodeling into their purchase price may be interested. Or someone may want it as an investment property.

    The house next to us belonged to an older lady. She died. She had 1 daughter who didn't want the house. It needed a lot of upgrading, but we are in a great neighborhood. A man bought it and did a lot of renovations and now rents it.
     
  16. Buckalew11

    Buckalew11 2013 1/2 Marathon Finisher!!! Woohoo!!

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    I dunno...can you tear down a 240 yo historical building? If you can, would the townspeople hate you for tearing down something that old?

    Our first house was on the historical register and that limited what we could do and how it was done. It was a cute little brick house with tons of work inside. We did refinish the floors and some other things but it was nothing but work, all the time. Plus, 25 years later, that house would not have supported all our electronics of today--it'd have probably blown up from all the chargers we have! ;)
     
  17. The Mystery Machine

    The Mystery Machine Sunrise at my house. :+)

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    I would have to pass on the house. That is too much to do for me at my age, 48 next week.

    We are going to be on the hunt for hopefully our "retirement house". So you are not marketing to people my age that is for sure. You have to capture the attention of a young family that wants a fixer upper. Your decor of the family photos has to go.

    I would HIGHLY recommend painting the living room with more a "lighter neutral tone" and changing the furniture arrangement at well. You need to make that "whole room" look better somehow. Get rid of the entertainment center.

    I would also take some pics in the spring and change those pictures of the outside of the house. You need to not have cars in front and the siding looks in desperate need of repair in that picture.

    Is the master in the basement? If so, than that would be a deal breaker. I need the master on the first floor.

    Are those your MLS pics or are those just pics you took? I would do some work and then repost different pictures as you progress forward.
     
  18. twinboysmom

    twinboysmom DIS Veteran

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    Hi OP. Lots of pretty harsh comments here. This is my opinion. You are looking for a specific type of buyer, someone who wants an old house with history. You have that. I have friends and family who are into houses like yours. They fully expect a lot of work and when I have looked at these houses, they look similar to yours (with the bathrooms and kitchens usually last renovated in the 50s and 60s). Price it right, listen to your realtor, keep it neat, tidy, and odor free, and hopefully it will sell soon. Good luck!
     
  19. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

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    I'm really sorry to get off topic but I looked at your other albums and wow you must really like sewing. You have over 50 pictures of the same dress.
     
  20. Granny square

    Granny square Always planning a trip!

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    That is kind of creeperish. Do you always do that?
     
  21. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

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    No, I thought maybe there were more photos of the house.
     

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