Weight loss surgery - does anyone REALLY need it?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by DizBelle, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. DizBelle

    DizBelle <font color=darkorchid>CSI: Can't Stand Idiots<br

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    I'm asking because I really don't know....

    Is there truly anyone for whom diet and exercise won't work and therefore they have to have weight loss surgery in order to lose weight?

    The point of weight loss surgery is to physically limit the amount of food one can take in. Food can also be limited just by not eating it. So why is surgery needed?

    FTR - I know of 2 people that have had weight loss surgery. One died a few days later in the hospital and the other doesn't look like he's lost any weight (he may have actually lost weight but to my eye he looks about the same size).
     
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  3. Robinrs

    Robinrs DIS Veteran

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    I actually know quite a few people who have had this surgery, including a family member.

    The biggest issue (besides the health risks) is the hanging skin afterwards. A co worker of mine lost weight VERY quickly and her skin was hanging everywhere. The insurance would not pay for it so she had to dole out thousands of dollar to fix it.

    My niece has the lapband. She lost LOTS of weight but tells no one she had it done, sort of like Starr Jones. She tells everyone exercise and lots of water :rolleyes: Did she forget that her MOTHER is my big mouth SISTER? :confused:
     
  4. Disneyland1084

    Disneyland1084 OH PLEASE SOMEBODY TELL ME!

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    My MIL got the lapband surgery, but still ate poorly and food she was to avoid. It stretched, so she had to have it removed. She then had gastric bypass, and still eats the wrong food. She really hasn't lost much. I love her, but she doesn't take care of herself.
     
  5. skylizard

    skylizard DIS Veteran

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    I think there are extreme cases were it is necessary. Otherwise, I don't think it really solves the root of the problem in most cases.
    I have a friend who had it done a few years ago and has lost a lot of weight. However, that person still makes poor eating choices. The lapband limits what they can eat, but said friend still choses to eat poorly (Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, McDs, etc). :confused3 So instead of eating lots of unhealthy food, they are eating smaller amounts of unhealthy food.
     
  6. NaLisa

    NaLisa DIS Veteran

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    For morbidly obese people with serious health issues related to their weight and who have had difficulty losing weight for whatever reason, the benefits of the surgery are likely justified.
     
  7. SumWhrOvrThRanBo

    SumWhrOvrThRanBo Mouseketeer

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    Gastric Bypass patient here. It was the BEST decision I've ever made and the only regret I have is that I didn't decide to do it sooner. I've struggled with my weight since the 2nd grade-- I've tried diet & exercise -- I've done fad diets, diet pills, diet shakes, workout DVDs, gym memberships-- I've stuck with them and had little to no results-- at the time of surgery I weighed 313-- 2 years later the scale reads 167-- my ideal goal is 140-- I'd like to get there before my WDW trip in October.
     
  8. DizBelle

    DizBelle <font color=darkorchid>CSI: Can't Stand Idiots<br

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    What kind of "extreme cases"?
     
  9. FireDancer

    FireDancer DIS Veteran

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    I don't think it is necessarily bad but also don't think it is the best approach. My biggest issue with the surgery is that it only addresses one aspect of the cause of the patient's obesity...eating too much. It doesn't teach them what they should be eating, address any emotional or psychological issues such as comfort eating, and doesn't address other lifestyle factors.

    Losing a lot of weight should take time and should come from a lot of lifestyle changes. If these lifestyle changes are all done and, more importantly, stuck with for the remainder of your life, I do think most people will lose weight without surgery and keep it off long term. If a patient wants to speed up the process with surgery they can but if they ignore all the other issues and expect the surgery to be a catch all they will almost certainly end up gaining all the weight back.
     
  10. NaLisa

    NaLisa DIS Veteran

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    Congrats and best of luck with those remaining unwanted pounds!
     
  11. DizBelle

    DizBelle <font color=darkorchid>CSI: Can't Stand Idiots<br

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    What kinds of difficulties?
     
  12. mckelvey72

    mckelvey72 Mouseketeer

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    Diet and exercise is definitely all you need....in addition to a HUGE amount of willpower and the desire to change your habits. I am not large but any means but wanted to lose 25 pounds prior to my Disney trip last year so I did P90X and a meal replacement shake called Shakeology. I changed some of my eating habits and I was successfull...in 90 days I had lost that 25 pounds and felt great. Since returning from the Disney trip, I did not make it a lifestyle change....and I gained it all back. Now onto my 2nd round.

    If I understand correctly, the surgeries limit your intake of food...however if you eat the incorrect foods the surgery is not going to help.

    I love P90X and am getting ready to do another round....after my broken ankle heals. But one thing I learned last year is that I can do it...but again, it is a lifestyle change and you have to have the desire to do it. Just look at Biggest Loser...it can be done. But a few of them have left the ranch and gained all the weight back cause they were not prepared to change their habits at home which is sad.
     
  13. skylizard

    skylizard DIS Veteran

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    Well said :goodvibes
     
  14. DizBelle

    DizBelle <font color=darkorchid>CSI: Can't Stand Idiots<br

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    How did limiting food by sticking with a diet not work but limiting food by surgical change did? This is the part I don't understand...
     
  15. skylizard

    skylizard DIS Veteran

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    Congrats!! :cheer2:
     
  16. DisReno

    DisReno Mouseketeer

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    Most of the times, the underlying issue is not being addressed in surgery-which is addiction. Surgery cures the overeating for a time, but usually these men or women switch addictions.

    My friend is in a chemical dependency recovery group and says that several woman have come into the group who had bypass surgery and are now alcoholics. They can't handle the alcohol, though, with their surgery, so even that has serious health consequences.

    Overeating is not really about willpower-it's more about addictions and compulsions that need treatment.
     
  17. FireDancer

    FireDancer DIS Veteran

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    I think sometimes people just don't have the willpower to do it without the surgery. That becomes dangerous because that forced willpower erodes overtime as the body adapts. If the bad habits aren't also addressed along with the surgery it will not work long term. It isn't really any different than yo-yo dieting or jumping from one fad diet to another. It will only work if it is a jumping off point to new habits but that is true of all avenues of weight loss, surgery or otherwise.
     
  18. joviroxx

    joviroxx <font color=blue>rectally reporters television pro

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    Ive lost a lot of weight, half my body weight actually. It took me 2 years without surgery, but somehow managed. That said, I am a believer that ANY tool you can use to help, is a good thing.

    Weight loss surgery, like any kind of aid, is just that, an AID. If you see it as a quick solution, it won't work. Big successful weight loss involves many, many changes. You must figure out how you got to where you are and be willing to change it. If not, it won't work, nothing will.

    Different things work for different people. The mental aspect of facing what might seem like a daunting task (losing so much weight and knowing its going to take long) is just as important as the physical aspect of controlling your food intake. Surgeries, drastic, quick loss at first, they can all help to keep you motivated and overcoming weaknesses that are hurting you.

    Smaller stomachs, help reducing appetite, etc, all aid. But like I said, they are AIDS, and no long term success will be had if you don't use them that way. That is why you see some people not be successful. It's why you see people gain weight after a diet. Its not that the diet was bad because "after you lose, you gain right back", its because the person probably went right back to old habits.

    Im all for whatever helps. Just realize its YOU that needs to make the change, the surgery, crash diet, etc, won't do it for you.
     
  19. lovemygoofy

    lovemygoofy DIS Veteran

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    I understand there is about to be a pile on about how nasty fat people are. I'll pass on that.

    However to answer this question, the weight starts coming off because it's almost equivalent to "starving" oneself at first. Basically that person has cut their food/calorie instake by 75% or more and feels fuller faster. If they are maintaining an exercise regiment then they are going to lose the weight faster because they outputting more calories than intaking.

    With straight diet and exercise, if someone is used to eating a specific amount and think about how much it could take to make one feel "full" then that person is just fighting to output the calories from just that day and for some that is a fighting battle.

    I'm a fat girl. I'm not as fat as I was and I will always be fat to an extent but I do pay attention to what I eat and follow a pretty good exercise plan. I'm healthier for it of course but not skinnier for it. I'm okay with that even if others around me want to put the finger and judge.

    Okay back to the fat people pile on.
     
  20. dizluvah

    dizluvah DIS Veteran

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    I agree with you but wanted to mention - nutrition classes as well as counseling sessions with a psychologist are required before the surgery will be conducted at a reputable practice offering weight loss surgery. My friend just had the surgery and I have attended the information session for the same hospital group that performed her surgery. Therapy sessions are an absolute pre-requisite, as well as multiple nutrition sessions because what the person will be able to ingest (especially initially) will be radically different after the surgery. Of course, there are 3 different weight loss surgeries (probably more but I only learned about 3 options) - so each would provide the recipient different results. In general, lap band will result in the least amount of weight loss but allows for more "freedom" to eat.
     
  21. Arielle22

    Arielle22 <font color=red>We have had spirits<br><font color

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    My sister had the gastric bypass. My nephew wa 2 years old and she didn't want to be the fat mom. She has steadily gained weight her adult life. She tried various weight loss plans but none seemed to stick.

    She did have counseling prior to her surgery and a nutritionist talked to her group about proper eating habits. The surgery not only makes your stomach smaller but bypasses part of your intestines so you don't absorb as much.

    It was wildly successful for her. She has kept the weight off several years. She makes sure to eat her protein then her veggies before drinking at a meal. She used to be an emotional eater (like all of us sisters) but has overcome that.

    Her doctor says she was a great candidate because although she was morbidly obese, she didn't have any health conditions yet.

    OP, in my opinion some people do need the surgery. Some people can lose the weight without intervention but others can't.
     

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