We are off to eat and drink around the world :)....

Discussion in 'Completed Trip Reports' started by dgbg100106, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    It was really loud and a combo of barking and shrieking, hard to explain, but I would have never guessed it was the peacock...
     
  2. Avatar

    Google AdSense Guest Advertisement


    to hide this advert.
  3. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    After a couple of days it is time to head back to San Jose...

    I have a mini dismeet with dwheatl

    [​IMG]

    We had dinner and spent them time talking, it was a lot of fun to finally meet in person.
     
  4. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    So I made it home and right after the 4th of July I was out in my Herb Garden and I found this little guy, I thought it was so pretty, and cool.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    On the 9th of July we decided to go up to Baltimore and visit the Sports Legends Museum and the birthplace of Babe Ruth....

    [​IMG]

    And look who I see when we walk through the doors...

    [​IMG]

    This museum, is actually at Camden Yards, which was the original train station in Baltimore.
    There was a little history of the railroad, riots and Mr. Lincoln before we got to the sports stuff...



    This is a train car...

    [​IMG]

    This is a Botany Cross worn by Gresham Hough of the Confederate 1st MD Cavalry, this showed soldiers that were from the State of Maryland while fighting for the Confederacy... I thought it was interesting.


    [​IMG]


    This is a 1861 Colt Revolver, and was the property of Private Charles Butler of 4th Regiment, Company A.
    [​IMG]


    This is the 3rd Potomac Home Infantry Flag from 1863
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    On to the sports section.....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    We leave the museum there and head over to the birthplace now...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is the front room of the house
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is the parents bedroom

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is the outside of the house
    [​IMG]
     
  7. franandaj

    franandaj I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    23,966
    Nice updates! I especially like the last one of your DH, that's cute!

    OK, you posted another update while I was posting. I meant the one where he was huddling with all the other baseball players....do they call it that in baseball?
     
  8. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    The huddle is right but it is football players. But close enough i knew what you meant.

    Thanks... He hates when i post his picture but he will get over it.
     
  9. franandaj

    franandaj I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    23,966
    Brandi!!!!!!


    You got a Scrollie!!!!!!!!
     
  10. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    I got a scrollie........:banana: :banana: :banana: :banana::worship::worship::worship:

    isnt it wonderful!

    Begging works :lmao:
     
  11. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    July 15th....

    Crime and Punishment museum in DC

    This is the outside of the Crime and Punishment Museum
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    This is one of the first things you see.
    [​IMG]

    Once you start in the museum, it walks you through a history of crime...

    you start in Medieval, then to Colonial Times, next Depression-Era Criminals, then Wild West Outlaws and finally to modern day..

    Here is David playing around in the Pillory...
    The pillory was a device made of a wooden or metal framework erected on a post, with holes for securing the head and hands, formerly used for punishment by public humiliation and often further physical abuse, sometimes lethal.
    [​IMG]

    Next is some pistols that were used during pirating on the seas...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    here is the photo of the Dalton Gang all laid out after they were killed..

    [​IMG]


    The James gang
    [​IMG]

    James Gang Pistol
    [​IMG]

    James family confederate flag
    [​IMG]

    This is Issac Parker "The Hanging Judge"
    In 21 years on the bench, Judge Parker tried 13,490 cases, 344 of which were capital crimes. Guilty pleas or convictions were handed down in 9,454 cases. Of the 160 sentenced to death by hanging (156 men and 4 women), 79 were actually hanged. The rest died in jail, appealed, or were pardoned.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    The Good guys....
    Bat Masterson - William Barclay "Bat" Masterson (November 26, 1853–October 25, 1921) was a figure of the American Old West known as a buffalo hunter, U.S. Marshal and Army scout, avid fisherman, gambler, frontier lawman, and sports editor and columnist for the New York Morning Telegraph. He was the brother of lawmen James Masterson and Ed Masterson.

    Allan Pinkerton - Allan Pinkerton (25 August 1819 – 1 July 1884) was a Scottish American detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton National Detective Agency.

    [​IMG]

    This is a picture of Wild Bill Hickok's revolver,

    [​IMG]

    Hickok came to the West as a stagecoach driver, then became a lawman in the frontier territories of Kansas and Nebraska. He fought for the Union Army during the American Civil War, and gained publicity after the war as a scout, marksman, actor, and professional gambler. Between his law-enforcement duties and gambling, which easily overlapped, Hickok was involved in several notable shootouts. He was shot and killed while playing poker in a Dakota Territory saloon.

    Virgil Earp - Virgil Walter Earp (July 18, 1843–October 19, 1905) fought in the Civil War. He was U.S. Deputy Marshal for south-eastern Arizona and Tombstone City Marshal at the time of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in the Arizona Territory. Two months after the shootout in Tombstone, outlaw Cowboys ambushed Virgil on the streets of Tombstone, shattering his left arm, leaving him maimed for life. His brother Morgan Earp was assassinated in March and Virgil left Tombstone for Colton, California to live with his parents and recuperate. When 16 years old, Virgil was married in Pella, Iowa. While Earp served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, his wife received a false report that he had died and, so, moved to Oregon with her parents. Virgil did not see her or his daughter again for 37 years. He married two more times.

    Virgil held a variety of jobs throughout his life, though he primarily worked in law enforcement. His younger brother Wyatt, who spent most of his life as a gambler, became better known as a lawman because of writer Stuart N. Lake's fictionalized 1931 biography Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal and later portrayals of him in movies and fiction as Old West's "toughest and deadliest gunmen of his day.

    This is a picture of Wyatt Earp's Revolver
    [​IMG]

    Now on to the Great Depression crimes...

    This is a picture of the Thompson Submachine gun

    [​IMG]
    The Thompson is an American submachine gun, invented by John T. Thompson in 1919, that became infamous during the Prohibition era. It was a common sight in the media of the time, being used by both law enforcement officers and criminals. The Thompson was also known informally as: the "Tommy Gun", "Trench Broom", "Trench Sweeper", "Chicago Typewriter", "Chicago Piano", and "chopper".

    The Baker - Karpis Gang

    Kate "Ma" Barker (born Arizona Donnie Clark; October 8, 1873 – January 16, 1935) was the mother of several criminals who ran the Barker gang from the "public enemy era", when the exploits of gangs of criminals in the Midwest gripped the American people and press.

    Alvin Francis Karpis (born Albin Francis Karpowicz; August 10, 1907 – August 26, 1979), nicknamed "Creepy" for his sinister smile, was an American criminal known for his alliance with the Barker gang in the 1930s. He was the last "public enemy" to be taken.

    [​IMG]

    The Dillinger Gang
    John Herbert Dillinger, Jr. (June 22, 1903 – July 22, 1934) was an American gangster and bank robber in Depression-era United States. He was charged with, but never convicted of, the murder of an East Chicago police officer during a shoot-out. This was his only alleged homicide. His gang robbed two dozen banks and four police stations. Dillinger escaped from jail twice.

    In 1933-34, seen in retrospect as the heyday of the Depression-era outlaw, Dillinger was the most notorious of all, standing out even among more violent criminals such as Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, and Bonnie and Clyde. Media reports were spiced with exaggerated accounts of Dillinger's bravado and daring and his colorful personality. The government demanded federal action, and J. Edgar Hoover developed a more sophisticated Federal Bureau of Investigation as a weapon against organized crime and used Dillinger and his gang as his campaign platform to launch the FBI .

    After evading police in four states for almost a year, Dillinger was wounded and returned to his father's home to recover. He returned to Chicago in July 1934 and met his end at the hands of police and federal agents who were informed of his whereabouts by Ana Cumpanas (the owner of the lodge where Dillinger sought refuge at the time). On July 22, the police and Division of Investigation closed in on the Biograph Theater. Federal agents, led by Melvin Purvis, moved to arrest him as he left the theater. He pulled a weapon and attempted to flee but was shot three times and killed.

    [​IMG]

    Bonnie and Clyde

    Bonnie Elizabeth Parker was born in Rowena, Texas, the second of three children. Her father, Charles Parker, a bricklayer, died when Bonnie was four. Her mother, Emma Krause, moved with the children to her parents' home in Cement City, an industrial suburb of Dallas, where she found work as a garment sewer. Parker was one of the best students in her high school, winning top prizes in spelling, writing and public speaking

    Clyde Chestnut Barrow was born in Ellis County, Texas, near Telico, a town just south of Dallas. He was the fifth of seven children of Henry Basil Barrow (1874-1957) and Cumie T. Walker (1874-1943), a desperately poor farming family that emigrated, piecemeal, to Dallas in the early 1920s as part of a wave of resettlement from the impoverished nearby farms to the impoverished urban slum known as West Dallas. It was a place of flimsy shanties and tent cities, piles of garbage and teeming open sewers, swarming insects and rampaging epidemics. The Barrows had neither shanty nor tent: they spent their first months living under their wagon. When father Henry had earned enough money to buy a tent, it was a major step up for the family.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    Next up the MOB...


    [​IMG]

    Alphonse Gabriel "Al" Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947) was an American gangster who led a Prohibition-era crime syndicate. The Chicago Outfit, which subsequently became known as the "Capones", was dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging liquor, and other illegal activities such as prostitution, in Chicago from the early 1920s to 1931.

    Born in Brooklyn, New York to Italian immigrants, Capone became involved with gang activity at a young age after being expelled from school at age 14. In his early twenties, he moved to Chicago to take advantage of a new opportunity to make money smuggling illegal alcoholic beverages into the city during Prohibition. He also engaged in various other criminal activities, including bribery of government figures and prostitution. Despite his illegitimate occupation, Capone became a highly visible public figure. He made various charitable endeavors using the money he made from his activities, and was viewed by many to be a "modern-day Robin Hood".

    Capone was publicly criticized for his involvement in the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre, when seven rival gang members were executed. Capone was convicted on federal charges of tax evasion, and sentenced to federal prison. His incarceration included a term at the new Alcatraz federal prison. In the final years of Capone's life, he suffered mental and physical deterioration due to late-stage neurosyphilis, which he had contracted as a youth. On January 25, 1947, he died from cardiac arrest after suffering a stroke.

    Some of his stuff...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The Apalachin Meeting was a historic summit of the American Mafia held on November 14, 1957, at the home of mobster Joseph "Joe the Barber" Barbara in Apalachin, New York. The meeting was attended by roughly 100 Mafiosi from the United States, Canada, and Italy. Expensive cars with license plates from around the country aroused the curiosity of local and state law enforcement, who raided the meeting, causing Mafiosi to flee into the woods and the area surrounding the Barbara estate. More than 60 underworld bosses were detained and indicted.

    The direct and most significant outcome of the Apalachin meeting was that it helped to confirm the existence of the American Mafia, which some, including Federal Bureau of Investigation director J. Edgar Hoover, had long refused to acknowledge.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    These pictures showcase some of the items belonging to David Richard Berkowitz, John Wayne Gacy, Albert Henry DeSalvo and Charles Milles Manson

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    Here is David in a line up.... He looks so evil doesn't he :rotfl:

    [​IMG]

    This next section is on prisons

    Here is a mock up of Al Capone's cell...looks pretty nice.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    "Old Smokey," an electric chair used by the state of Tennessee from 1916 to 1960. The story of Old Smokey leading up to its acquisition by the museum in 2008 might generate some genuine shivers. In 1913, Tennessee installed the electric chair in the state prison after switching from hangings to electrocution as the state's main method of execution. Over the next 44 years, 125 men were electrocuted — 85 of the men black and 40 white. Executions peaked in the 1930s, when 47 men were put to death by the chair.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a gas chamber
    Between 1930 and 1980 945 men and 7 women were put to death in Gas Chambers in various states.

    [​IMG]

    Mixing of the gas...
    [​IMG]

    Badges
    [​IMG]

    FBI 10 most wanted posters.
    [​IMG]

    My favorite poster of all.
    [​IMG]

    Tools
    [​IMG]


    Reading this brought tears to my eyes
    [​IMG]


    The live broadcast of Americas Most Wanted happens here at the museum also.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. dwheatl

    dwheatl DIS Veteran<br><font color=limegreen>Can you tell

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Messages:
    3,672
    Wow, Brandi, great mini TR! My dad was a retired cop, and would have loved this Museum. We traveled to Tombstone when I was a kid to see the OK Corral. In 4th grade, I loved Western biographies like Hickock and Calamity Jane. If I ever get back to DC, I'm putting this museum on my list.
     
  16. franandaj

    franandaj I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    23,966
    Very cool! We plan on going back to DC sometime in the near future and we'll have to put this museum on our list of places to hit!
     
  17. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    Glad you liked it... We had a great time.. My foot was killing me by the end, but we really enjoyed it. It was very entertaining and informative. I would recommend it to anyone.
     
  18. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    It is one of the many many places I would suggest to visit here in DC... Now it is not a free place unlike most here, but it was fun!
     
  19. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    August 4th .... Dr. Appt, at the foot and ankle Dr.

    Said I had torn cartilage in my big toe, said it was like a flap turned inside out. Well it is painful and this is what I got in return.

    [​IMG]

    Me and the boot commuting to work on the train.

    [​IMG]

    Don't the vents on the top almost look like devil horns
    [​IMG]
     
  20. dgbg100106

    dgbg100106 Missing the Tag Fiary

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    49,046
    August 5th - was date night at the Kennedy Center - we are off to see Uncle Vanya starring Kate Blanchett

    David took me to Legal Seafood for dinner prior to the play, we had drinks and food and generally enjoyed ourselves..

    This a BBQ sandwich off their Happy Hour, yes I understand that we are at a seafood restaurant but I have to try it
    [​IMG]

    This was sauteed shrimp and fries in bacon grease....yes BACON grease.
    [​IMG]

    This was a spicy Thai calamari that was so wonderful, I still think about it and want to go back for more, so crispy and spicy and cooked perfectly, not chewy at all.
    [​IMG]

    This was a lobster BLT slider, they were so small, I could have eaten a dozen of them.
    [​IMG]

    This is the ultimate, she crab soup, with a floater of sherry on top, oh my goodness, it is so mouth watering wonderful.
    [​IMG]

    This is Mr. Boot resting up in the hall of nations in the Kennedy Center, waiting for the show...
    [​IMG]

    Blanchett plays Yelena opposite Hugo Weaving as Astrov and Richard Roxburgh in the title role. Using vaguely modern dress and a fashionably dilapidated set, the staging evokes the world of landed gentry in czarist Russia before the turn of the century. The story follows the romantic permutations of a group of tenants on a country estate following the arrival of Professor Serebryakov (John Bell) and his much younger wife, Yelena (Blanchett).

    I had read so many wonderful reviews about the play and we had seen Blanchett in Street Car Named Desire in 2009 and thought that she was wonderful and made the whole play. Well we were in for a LOOONNNGGGG night tonight.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If it had not been for Cate we would have left at intermission, it just went on and on and I was so tired and it was so boring......

    Oh well I had a wonderful dinner with my husband!!!!
     
  21. franandaj

    franandaj I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    23,966
    Great pics! I love Legal Seafoods! I didn't realize they had them that far south. We always went to the one outside Newton Center (near Boston). sorry you didn't care for the play that much, but as long as you're well fed anything is tolerable! :rotfl2:
     

Share This Page