WDW -Disability Access Service (DAS) Post 1 updated 4/25/14 - stamps at attractions

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by SueM in MN, Sep 28, 2013.

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  1. CUGrad

    CUGrad Earning My Ears

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    We had the nice experience you talked about when entering the park a couple of times. Basically suggesting that I use my finger for her. This one time at DHS, admonished was the correct word. Unfortunately it went beyond helpful suggestion. We later discovered that the problem was my daughter had slid 2 fingers on. Once we figured that out it was smooth sailing. Other times that we had an issue a Guest Relations CM was there to address it and send us on our way into the park. This is a part of Disney's process that doesn't always work for some people with limited motor skills. Your situation, Sue, shows how it can really mess things up. I explained that to them at Guest Relations and they said they hadn't really thought of that. I didn't go out of my way to say anything about this. We had a huge mix-up with our tickets that caused us to spend close to an hour in GR. It was just part of our conversation.

    I was so happy with all the many things that Disney did right because all of the changes (DAS, FP+, techie new stuff) had me worried before our trip. They definitely have some bugs to work out with all of those. But overall it was the usual magical Disney experience I have come to expect with a little hiccups here and there and more planning on my part.
     
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  3. MVC1225

    MVC1225 Mouseketeer

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    What, if any, is the policy for using the DAS with a ride in soft opening? I ask because we are going in a few weeks and the mine train may be in soft openings while we are there.
     
  4. homeschoolmomof4

    homeschoolmomof4 Keep moving forward

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    So our situation is that the three of us that are going(my mother, my daughter and myself) all have Ehlers-Danlos. We all have issues with conveyor belt rides that require us to go from a moving belt to a non moving surface, stairs. We obviously won't be doing big thrill type of rides, but even things like getting out of the cars for Spaceship Earth and going from conveyor belt to another surface can cause us to dislocate if we're not careful. Can the DAS help us get the ride slowed down, particularly for my elderly mother, so she has more time to embark and disembark a ride? My daughter also has the added complication of POTS so standing long periods of time can cause her to faint. We're already planning on going during a slow time in January to avoid lines and we're proficient with FP+, so I'm not terribly worried about the POTS. I'm more concerned about the darned conveyor belts.
     
  5. LilyWDW

    LilyWDW Going to My Happy Place

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    The issue with most soft openings is that you can't guarantee that the attraction will be running at any specific time. It is very hit or miss. So I am not too sure how well a DAS would work since there will be a higher then average possibility of the ride no longer running once the time is up.
     
  6. LilyWDW

    LilyWDW Going to My Happy Place

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    I believe for issues like having the belts slowed or stopped that those are handled AT the attraction. A DAS is for issues that would keep a person from being able to stand in line at all, minus issues for mobility and stamina. So it wouldn't do anything for needing the belts slowed/stopped.

    When you get to that point of the attraction, just speak to the CM.
     
  7. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    I agree with this.
    I know when the Little Mermaid ride in New Fantasyland opened, it would sometimes be open for only a very short time.
    They would gather a few people to ride, have them go and then close it again.
    It could be open for a few minutes or a few hours.
    Also agree with this.
    DAS is for issues having to do with waiting in the traditional line; the only accommodation the DAS gives is that the user gets a Return Time so that their waiting for the attraction is done outside of the line.

    Issues like boarding, where to be seated, etc. are handled at the attraction by talking to the CM.
    ALSO, be aware that they will slow the moving walkway, but very seldom stop it entirely. One of the reasons is that when rides are actually stopped, even for a short period, there is concern that guests on the attraction may try to stand up or get out of their ride car. So stopping entirely is avoided as much as possible.

    If readers have not checked out post one of this thread, it is a DAS FAQs and can explain a lot about how DAS works.
     
  8. Angel Ariel

    Angel Ariel DIS Veteran

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    I have a question regarding the stroller as a wheelchair. DD has developmental delays and she is not yet standing solidly or walking. She's 21 months and about to start crawling. I cannot hold her for long periods of time any more...DH could hold her a bit longer, but even then she's getting long and heavy and difficult to carry for long (like waiting for a ride). There's no other reason, though, that would prevent her (or us) from waiting in the regular line. She is fine in crowds, noise doesn't bother her, etc. Right now her only dx is the delays - no specific cause. After reading the first post, am I correct in thinking that the most appropriate accommodation for her would be the stroller as a wheelchair card (rather than the DAS)?

    I don't know exactly when we're taking DD next, and obviously I hope that she will be walking and standing by then and this will be a non-issue. She's made a lot of strides in the past 2 months, and it's been very exciting for us. I just want to know what our options would be if we did decide to take a trip with her soon, and she weren't yet standing/walking. Thanks!
     
  9. clanmcculloch

    clanmcculloch DIS Veteran

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    Yes, the stroller as a wheelchair will absolutely be your best way to go. It 100% meets your needs from what you've said.

    Once she's walking, if she still has trunk strength and/or endurance issues then the stroller as a wheelchair tag may still be an appropriate accommodation to cut down on her walking.
     
  10. Angel Ariel

    Angel Ariel DIS Veteran

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    Thank you very much! I just read the first post again, and I have a few questions.

    Are the stroller as wheelchair cards available at Guest Relations outside the park, or do you have to go to GR in a park?

    Also, am I correct in reading the first post and thinking that our entire party will be able to stay together in a mainstreamed line (whether SB or FP+) as long as the line is WC accessible? What happens at attractions where the main lines aren't WC accessible and there is a separate mobility entrance? Would our entire party be allowed to be together? I saw the rules regarding how many people the DAS would be issued for, but since we wouldn't have a DAS since we just need the stroller as wheelchair, I wasn't sure if it was handled differently?

    (Please note I am in no way trying to get specialized access or anything...it's not about wait time, we're just likely to be there with my parents and possibly my brother's family and we don't like to split up and spend time apart. We obviously would if we needed to, I'm just trying to understand the rules.)
     
  11. Skip2MyLou

    Skip2MyLou Mouseketeer

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    I have scanned through the first page, and tried to search. I'm sure these questions have already been asked but I can't find them.

    My mom had a mild heart attack last Friday night. We leave for Disney in 11 days. We have spoken to her doctor in depth regarding this trip. He has cleared her to go with a few restrictions. His main concerns are the heat and the rides. The rides we are ok with, as my mom doesn't ride anything bigger than PoC.

    Will the DAS card help her with the heat? I thought the old GAC allowed for waiting areas in air conditioning, but from what I'm understanding this is different, right? Basically she would get a return time and then she could go to other indoor rides or shops to pass the time. Am I understanding this correctly? I don't want to waste time at Guest Services getting the card if it isn't necessary.

    The other issue is our party size. 6 including the guest with the DAS card,right? We have 7, plus 2 under age 2, so 9 total. We do not plan on staying together all of the time, but there are just a few things that we wanted to do as group, like Dumbo.

    Any advice is appreciated. I know we are very lucky to have not had to deal with this on our past trips. I just want to make this one a good one for Mom :)
     
  12. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    Honestly, trying to do WDW just 2 weeks after a heart attack sounds like more than I could handle. Even with doctor approval, I don't think I would try it. Especially if you are far from home.

    You can request a DAS, though the majority of the lines are shaded or indoors. I haven't heard if Guest Relations is issuing DAS for heat-related needs or not, and the DAS will only be useful if mom will be riding -- it can't be used by the rest of the party. Most heat exposure will occur outside, moving around the park. Try to alternate rides and shows, though it sounds like mom might not do much for rides anyway, in which case she can wait indoors at a shop or restaurant. I suggest taking some precautions and planning for heat: Frogg Toggs cooling towels, a big floppy hat, long sleeved light weight tops (yes, the long sleeves actually feel cooler than short sleeves or tank tops), frequent breaks, free ice water from CS locations. There is a First Aid location in each park where she can go to get into A/C and rest if necessary.

    If you do get a DAS, a supervisor can over-ride the standard maximum of 6 guests, but all of you will need to be present at Guest Relations for this. And keep in mind that even if 9 of you go through the lines together, most often you will be splitting up to board the ride vehicles.

    Enjoy your vacation!
     
  13. clanmcculloch

    clanmcculloch DIS Veteran

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    I would actually more concerned about stamina than heat. If she's not over-exerting herself then heat is much less of an issue. I would STRONGLY urge you to get her a wheelchair.

    Most queues are indoors. She'll be exposed to a lot more heat in between attractions and at outdoor shows and parades. You'll need to make sure to plan your day for bringing her back indoors in between outdoor attractions and the few attractions that have outdoor queues.
     
  14. Skip2MyLou

    Skip2MyLou Mouseketeer

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    Thank you for your advice!

    I understand what you are saying about not going 2 weeks after a heart attack. I share some concerns. However, I also know my mother and I know the medical issues that occurred. And I have spoken with her Doctor in length regarding this. So I'm ok with her choice to go. I'm just trying to make this as easy on her as possible and make sure it runs smoothly.


    Thanks! I've already reserved a EVC to be delivered to her hotel room to use for the week. So thats taken care of. The outdoor queues are my main concern. I'm trying to think of what rides she will want to go on that have outdoor queues and if this DAS will help with that. I don't want to waste time going to Guest Services if its not necessary.

    Some Fantasyland rides queue outside before they go inside, so I'm planning on doing those for morning. I think PoC is the biggest ride she will want to on and I will check to see if there is a warning on that one. Other than that, we are utilizing Fastpasses. We will look for a spot for parades close to a gift shop so that she can scoot inside to wait.

    Again, thanks for your thoughts!
     
  15. clanmcculloch

    clanmcculloch DIS Veteran

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    POC has an indoor queue. Please note that for POC she'll have to park the ECV and somebody will have to push her in a manual wheelchair through the queue (they have them at the ride, just ask a CM).
     
  16. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    Sorry, my response probably came out a little stronger than I intended; my dad had a minor stroke a year ago and there's no way I would take him far from home because while he appeared fully recovered, he was back at the hospital about 2.5 weeks later. That's where my mind went. You did mention in your first post that you had spoken at length with the doctor and he cleared the travel. Obviously, medical history, severity of the recent event, and prognosis would all factor into that decision and you know the situation better than anyone here.

    Good luck to her on her recovery and enjoy your vacation!
     
  17. 39CINDERELLA

    39CINDERELLA Waiting to dance at the Ball with my Prince

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  18. dkbschultz

    dkbschultz Earning My Ears

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    I am concerned about the new handicap policy at Disney World and looking for input from people who have experienced it. I am in a wheel chair due to an amputation and I do not know what to expect. I have read where you have to keep going back to the customer service place to get a new time but that seems like a huge hassle and I have read that you need to go to a ride then come back which for me is tough and my chair on has so much power. I am also trying to figure out how I would wait in a normal line with a chair and then get off the ride and need the chair on the other side and how that works. It really stinks to have the people who clearly need the accommodations get screwed by the people who abuse it. I read where Disney is being sued by the ADA for this and hope before my trip in September that the current system gets tweaked a bit. I know people are worried about people in chairs seeing more of the park than regular healthy people, but at least in my case/situation having to take so much time transferring in and out of the chair actually slows me up. Thanks in advance for any help anyone can offer me.
     
  19. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    Welcome! If you check the first few posts of this thread, those are the basics of the new Disability Access Service (DAS) card.

    Unless you have concerns other than you mentioned here, you will not need (or qualify) for a DAS. Most lines at WDW are mainstreamed and wheelchair accessible. If your disability is mobility-related and the wheelchair resolves that, you will enter the regular standby queues. At the few attractions that are not mainstreamed (such as stairs), CMs at the attraction will direct you to the accessible entrance. You MAY receive a "wheelchair return card" if it is busy at the park and/or that specific attraction, but reports of these in use at WDW are relatively few. CMs will make sure your chair is at the exit for when you need to get off. If you need moving walkways slowed or stopped, you should inform the CM when you enter the queue and move along the line.

    Enjoy your vacation!
     
  20. dkbschultz

    dkbschultz Earning My Ears

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    Thank you lanejudy. So just to verify, since my wheelchair will be needed up transfer on the ride I will use a separate line and my chair will be at the exit of the ride to return back too? Will the wait time just be as other non disabled people have? We picked the middle of September to try an avoid a ton of people at the parks. In addition, I will not need to stop by and get a DAS card?
     
  21. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    No.
    Most of the regular and Fastpass lines are wheelchair accessible all the way to boarding; these are called Mainstream Lines.
    So, in most cases, you will be in the same line as other guests. You will be in the regular line or if you have a Fastpass, you will be in the Fastpass line.

    There are a few lines where the regular line is not accessible. Those few attractions have a special wheelchair line. Cast Members (CMs) will direct you where to go.
    Some examples of those attractions include Jungle Cruise, Small World and Big Thunder Mountain Railroad at Magic Kingdom and Spaceship Earth at Epcot.
    If it is busy, when you arrive at the attraction, you will be given a time to return that is equal to the current wait in the regular line (if you have a Fastpass, you will be given a card to go directly to the accessible line).
    That is only for those inaccessible lines.
    In most cases, you board and get off in exactly the same place.

    If the unload point is somewhere different than where you loaded, the wheelchair will be brought from where you got on to where you get off.
    Some examples would be Pirates of the Caribbean at Magic Kingdom and Tower of Terror at the Studio.
    There are some attractions that have wheelchair accessible ride cars. Your wait for those might be longer than if you would not be using the accessible car because there may be only one ride car and you will need to wait for it to get to the boarding area.

    We had visited many times before the change to DAS (Disability Access Service) and 2 long trips since.
    We have made 2 long trips since DAS began and have found the waits in the accessible lines/accessible boarding areas seem to have decreased since DAS began.
    No, guests with mobility needs do not need anything to use their wheelchair in line. The CMs can see the mobility device and will send you to the correct place.
     
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