WDW -Disability Access Service (DAS) Post 1 updated 4/25/14 - stamps at attractions

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by SueM in MN, Sep 28, 2013.

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  1. lovethattink

    lovethattink DIS Veteran

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    For my son, it's POTC he avoids like the plague, too dark.

    I noticed that most of the FP+ lines go along the regular lines without all that winding back and forth.

    The day after Columbus Day was fairly crowded at Epcot. When I got the return time for Character Spot, the entrance was moved to where the exit use to be. The FP+ Entrance looked like it was sandwiched between the windows and the standby queue. We never made it to our return time, so I don't know if the queue actually was set up that way. It did look like a sea of people though. Before, the alternate entrance was away from the queue.

    My son's DAS only has three return times written on it after 3 visits. 2 crossed out and one not.
     
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  3. bookwormde

    bookwormde <font color=darkorchid>Heading out now, another ad

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    "Stamina and endurance are not a disability"

    I just wanted to clarify that while this can be true it also can be false, there are plenty of circumstance where if this is that manifestation of a disability that if would be considered a accomadatable situation under ADA. Lots of factor including duration of the existence of the condition, and if it impacts major life functions on a day to day basis are involved in determining this.
     
  4. Schmeck

    Schmeck <font color=blue>Funny thing is now my 17 year old

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    And the accommodation would be a wheelchair or ECV.
     
  5. cmwade77

    cmwade77 DIS Veteran

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    Yes, barring other factors that would make this unsafe or impractical. If there is no over in the party that can physically push a wheelchair, this would not be a practical solution and there are conditions that might make it unsafe to operate an ECV and by all accounts Disney is being reasonable about making accommodations in such cases. So I don't think we can say that this is the only accommodation that will be provided in these cases, just that it is if it is a reasonable accomodation.
     
  6. Poohsmommi

    Poohsmommi Mouseketeer

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    Ridiculous. I hope it is thrown out.
     
  7. tinkerpea

    tinkerpea DIS Veteran

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    Has anybody had any experience with needing 2 DAS cards for their family?

    We have a son with autism with the traditional needs.

    And I have another son who is younger with needs, they both will need a DAS card and both like completely different rides.
    So using one card for the family won't work due to the fact the oldest wont go nr certain roller coaster's HM and the youngest loves them!

    We always travel with my mum who takes oldest son off to do separate rides while we take you get son to do the more thrill types.

    I really hope this wont be a problem as I can see this ruin the trip, we have dressy scheduled FPs for each child's likes.
     
  8. tinkerpea

    tinkerpea DIS Veteran

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    Already scheduled not dressy scheduled lol stupid iPhone!!!!
     
  9. cmwade77

    cmwade77 DIS Veteran

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    The easiest way to deal with this is have her take him in to get a DAS at a different time than you.

    That's what we did, as both DW and I need a pass and we're going to be there at different times, sometimes without the other. Then other times we will be together. This was at DL, but I would think it would be similar.
     
  10. Objectivity

    Objectivity Kids make happy places happy.

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    My biggest concern remains the inequity between different disabilities. I don't mean in regard to the DAS being to meet a need and not a disability, I mean because it forces certain disabilities to continually justify their need.

    If someone is visually impaired, they often won't qualify for the DAS. Instead, their needs, often seating, are provided at the attraction. That means explaining to every CM that special seating is needed. That could be multiple CMs per attraction times the total number of attractions. How is that appropriate? Why must someone with that specific need have to repeatedly explain themselves? Those with wheelchairs don't. Those who qualify for the DAS don't.

    it sounds like Disney wants the DAS to be a magic bullet that fits the parameters necessary to reduce system overload. The problem is that its inefficient. Someone visually impaired should be able to get a card that says that and just show it at attractions with seating. No need to waste a CMs time with something that could be confirmed elsewhere. And no reason someone with a disability should be put in a position to fear a lack of accommodation due to a flaw in the system or to feel their disability is seen as lesser.
     
  11. andersonsc

    andersonsc Mouseketeer

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    Why must someone with that specific need have to repeatedly explain themselves? Those with wheelchairs don't. Those who qualify for the DAS don't.


    Why not just make a card that says you are visually impaired if you don't want to explain verbally to each cm
     
  12. curemyreed

    curemyreed DIS Veteran

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    Can anyone with experience tell us how this worked out?
     
  13. PatMcDuck

    PatMcDuck DIS Veteran

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    My son has the largest size (I think) Convaid Chair, his is a "Scout" model. They are very expensive, I got his on Ebay for $1000 or $1200, I forget. It sells for 2-3X that. (it was new, never used, tags still on it, family had to put their adult daughter in an institution). It even had the height extension for the back. Sean is about 5'8" and 160 pounds.

    It is actually more than he needs, in a way. I did not want a wheelchair, he has scoliosis too, and leans forward too much. I wanted a chair that tilted back, more like a stroller. The only downside, it is heavy, and does not fold up small (but it does fold). I gate check it at the airport.

    These chairs last a long time, and can be repaired if necessary. Parts are available. They come in many sizes, Sean will never outgrow it (he is 23) unless he gets overweight, I guess. We went from a McClaren, to using a transport chair (wheelchair without the big wheels on the side). I hated the way he hunched over in that transport chair, and it was not that comfortable.
     
  14. Queenie122

    Queenie122 Mouseketeer

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    We also have a Convaid and love it. I'm not sure what kind of insurance you have, but ours paid for my daughter's wheelchair. It is a lifesaver when we go to Disney!
     
  15. WheeledTraveler

    WheeledTraveler DIS Veteran

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    I think mostly people haven't talked in this thread about rides they can't ride because for discussions of the DAS it's not really relevant. If you can't do a ride even with accommodations, then you can't do it and you don't really need to worry about a DAS for it.

    Also, for most people, even wheelchair users and other disabled people, most rides/attractions are do-able. As a wheelchair user, the only attractions I really can't access at all purely due to using a wheelchair are Tom Sawyer Island & Tomorrowland Transit Authority. There are other attractions I can't do because of my impairment and how it effects me (pain, strain on body, etc.), but all other queues/attractions have accessible entrances. There's a guy who posts occasionally on the board who has paraplegia and I think he's been on most, if not all, rides with accessible entrances since he became paralyzed.

    I don't think any of us have problems replying to specific threads discussing things that might prevent people from riding specific rides (regardless of accommodations), but this thread isn't for that. A general thread about "what can't you ride and why not" without specifics to at least a certain condition and/or symptom is just so huge that I'm not sure it would be useful. People with the same diagnosis or symptoms aren't even going to have the same limitations, so if you just opened at thread up to the wide range of impairments represented on the board it would be too confusing and probably depressing for people reading it. Within the last few months there was a post on the disAbilities forum about "what rides/attractions do you miss", but most of the answers were relating to attractions that don't exist anymore.
     
  16. Mom2six

    Mom2six DIS Veteran

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    I thought this thread was for how the DAS works not personal opinion about whether or not people should have one or not/ opinion about who is disabled/ view on accommodations.
     
  17. Mom2six

    Mom2six DIS Veteran

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    How is this helpful in this thread about using the DAS? This is your personal opinion and this thread is not a debate as it has been posted before. Sometimes I think people post things like this in a thread about using the DAS just to be argumentative and insulting knowing that the people reading this thread are the ones who need assistance in the parks and then the thread gets hijacked by all the people who want to state an "opinion".
     
  18. Gracie09

    Gracie09 DIS Veteran

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    and that would be your opinion. This was in response to another post so why shouldn't it be here. Sue does a great job keeping this thread on track. If she has a problem with something that is posted she deal with it.
     
  19. aaarcher86

    aaarcher86 DIS Veteran

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    Quoting discussions that have ended and been addressed furthers the debate.

    Lets move on.
     
  20. delmar411

    delmar411 DIS Veteran

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    My YDD did this on Friday night at HS. She had gotten a time for RNRC but this is one of the rides she would normally loop and after riding with her time (she waited nearly an hour for her time) she took off to ride again while I was trying to convince her leave (was not working!) so I told her we'd go over to the CM and ask.

    So there was 4 mins until park close, the standby was still 30mins but there was no one in the FP lane since the park was kept open an extra hour at the last minute. I went over and asked if she would possibly be able to ride again before the park closed. The CM was very nice and gave her a rider swap pass to use right then instead of writing a time down on her card since that would be pretty much useless.

    Now, I took it as a bit of pixie dust instead of policy but it can't hurt to ask nicely at the end of the night.
     
  21. Twende

    Twende Best laid plans of Mouse and men.....

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    I agree with you and this was one of my frustrations from our last trip. On one attraction I had to explain my visual need to 4 CMs and was still literally left in the dark in a mob of people entering an attraction to get seats. I felt that the treatment I received was humiliating to me and extremely rude to other guests around me!

    I am working on some wording to place on my own GAC like card. It needs to be very simple wording and only a sentence or two explaining my vision needs. I just can not keep explaining my needs multiple times on attractions. It gets VERY old!

    If anyone has any suggestions, I would love to hear your wording. I do not need front row seating just near enough to see and I am mostly blind in dark or low light places. Flashlights only help so much as my eyes also have trouble adjusting to light changes and using a bright light only prolongs this adjustment time.
     
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