VERY OT - Need help from any Jewish members of board

Discussion in 'Budget Board' started by smellyann, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. smellyann

    smellyann Mouseketeer

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    We had a sudden death in the family today. My aunt left behind my three young cousins, and they are Jewish. My uncle - my late mom's brother - and the rest of us - are not, so I don't know much about the bereavement or any other customs.

    I would like to get the girls something nice, but relatively inexpensive and not budget-busting to remember their mother. My husband suggested angel pendants. Is that appropriate in Judaism? Is there something that would be more so? Thanks so much in advance.
     
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  3. Chickysmom

    Chickysmom Sadly....tagless

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    Sorry to hear of your family's loss. I just wanted to say that it is very thoughtful of you to be concerned about their religious beliefs when thinking of a bereavment gift.....if you do not get a response on this board perhaps you could call a local Jewish church (sorry maybe they are called something else, I mean no disrepect, just do not know). I am sure they would be happy to help you out.
     
  4. Cheshire Figment

    Cheshire Figment <font color=red><marquee behavior=alternate>Friend

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    Angels would NOT be appropriate. Also, do NOT send flowers to the funeral. Possible a nice framed photgraph from a family function.
     
  5. Cindy B

    Cindy B <font color=blue>Have taken some furniture polish

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    I know there is are Jewish posters, but I live nearby many Jewish families so I am very aware of customs.

    (I'm not, but live near many...)

    Will they sit shivah? When my workmate sibling passed on, they sat shivah for 7 days. On one specific day, the employees came and sat with them. I can't remember which day that was, and I hope others can give info on that.

    No flowers

    Until you hear from other posters I would search "Jewish funeral customs".
     
  6. Crazy Hakim

    Crazy Hakim DIS Veteran

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  7. Ratpack

    Ratpack WL VET DVC Gold

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    Wow- that is interesting..and I am glad I read the link- very helpful. It is truly respectful of you to think about the different customs for the funeral. I would have never known about the flowers and such.
     
  8. punkin

    punkin <font color=purple>Went through pain just to look

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    I am Jewish and I am a little uncomfortable with gift giving at funerals. It's not specifically forbidden but I wouldn't do it. I doubt they will need a gift from you to remind them of their mother anyway. :confused3

    What I would do is try to keep in contact with them and maybe take them to do some girlie things now that they do not have a mother.
     
  9. pearlieq

    pearlieq <font color=green>They can sit & spin<br><font col

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    I'm so sorry to hear of your loss. Make a shiva call and bring along a fruit basket.

    For something more special for the girls, maybe consider donating to a charity in the parents name. If they were interested in Israel there are several charities that will plant a tree or otherwise sustain/beautify the area in someone's honor.
     
  10. JoiseyMom

    JoiseyMom <font color=orange>Have you had your SPANX today??

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    Gifts are not given when a Jewish person dies. The person is usually buried in a very short period of time, and the greiving period that follows is called Shiva. The immediate family sits for 7 days. They do not sit on Friday night or Saturday during the day (this is our Sabbath). Food is sent to the Shiva home. The family is not supposed to cook, so people send prepared meals from a deli or something similar. If the family is Kosher, then kosher food should be sent. Fruit baskets, cakes, cookies, all good things to bring.

    I am very sorry for your loss. Depending on the age of the children, espeically if they are very young, bringing a book or quiet toy for them would not be a bad thing for them to keep busy.

    If you have any other specific questions, feel free to pm me.
     
  11. JoiseyMom

    JoiseyMom <font color=orange>Have you had your SPANX today??

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    It is called a Synagogue.
     
  12. ceecee

    ceecee DIS Veteran

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    If they are young and you are close by, offer your help to your uncle. Just stay involved in their lives and help with things they will need done. They will remember their mom and I don't think a gift would help at all. Take over a meal or dessert every so often as well.
     
  13. tar heel

    tar heel <font color=royalblue>Where will we get our news i

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    I'm not Jewish . . .

    I think the sentiment of getting the little girls a piece of jewelry or something is really good. I would not think of it as a funeral gift and would probably do it a bit later instead of now. If you want something with religious symbolism, I would try a synagogue store. Something with the mom's birthstone also might be appropriate.

    My DH's aunt died when her youngest daughter was in high school, and my MIL has tried through the years to do things for her that her mother might have done. For example, she created for each of her niece's four children a handmade shawl, sweater, etc., like she did for her grandchildren.
     
  14. mamaminnie

    mamaminnie DIS Veteran

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    I'm so sorry for your loss.

    I'm Jewish and I have to say that a gift like that is not appropriate. I'm not sure how religious they are but the best way to honor someone's memory is to give charity in their names.

    Maybe a gift to their synagogue or a local cause (doesn't have to be Jewish) that they feel strongly about.
     
  15. janets

    janets A bad day at Disney is better than a good day anyw

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    You've received pretty good advice so far.

    When we sat for my father, my co-workers sent a huge platter of food to feed the family and many came and paid shiva calls. It was very thoughtful.

    As for gifts, not appropriate. If this wasn't family, then making a donation to a charity in her name or perhaps planting a tree in Israel would be good. Since it's family, I'm not sure anything like that other than giving of your time and attention is necessary.

    Something else to consider is that if they were members of their temple, you might want to have a plaque engraved for her. At our temple, there are plaques on the walls with names and dates for loved ones. On the anniversary of their death, the light next to the plaque is lit and your loved one's names are included during the service for that week. I know that whenever I'm in temple, I always walk over and touch my dad's. It makes me feel that much better.

    And as you've heard, flowers not done either.

    Sending condolences to your family on your loss.
     
  16. rigs32

    rigs32 DIS Veteran

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    Angels are tied to the Christian view of heaven they are NOT a part of Judaism. Very similar to giving them a cross or saint pendant to remember their Jewish mother. A nice thought, but try to redirect it.
     
  17. HillPete

    HillPete Secret Simba Fan

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    Since this was an unexpected death of a fairly young person, there will probably be a huge number of people 'doing' for the immediate family. If you choose to send or bring food, perhaps something that can be frozen and used later when all the deli trays are gone would be a good idea. You might even go empty handed the first time you visit (they will most likely sit shiva for a week) and see what they need, then bring that item the next day. When we sat for my mom we were inundated with cookies and nothing else. My dad, DH and I were on a sugar high for the whole 7 days. A deli tray or pizza would have been nice.

    So sorry for your loss.

    --Hillary
     
  18. smellyann

    smellyann Mouseketeer

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    Thank you for all the responses! Uh-oh, I have made a mistake. First, they are in South Florida and I am in Virginia, and I cannot make it to the funeral. My sister in NY and I ordered flowers last night to be sent to the house, not the funeral. Should I cancel the order if there is still time? I didn't know that.

    If I gave the girls a necklace or something, it would be in July or August when I have a chance to get down there, not for the funeral. My own mother died when I was 7, so I have been there. They don't need help to remember her, but it would just be a gesture of love.

    I will spend more time reading through everything and seeing what else I can do that is appropriate. Thank you so much for all the help and thoughts. Oh, my uncle, her husband, is not Jewish, and as I have not spent any time with them in recent years and Aunt had been sick for a year (death was not expected, though), I'm not sure how much they practiced their faith, what their customs were, whether they kept Kosher, etc. I do know they went to Hebrew school, learned the language, the two older girls had Bat Mitzvahs, etc.
     
  19. offwegotoneverland

    offwegotoneverland Mouseketeer<br><font color=darkorchid>Apparently o

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    Try and see if the florsit can swap the flowers for a fruit basket still...that might be worth a shot.

    If your thinking later summer time for a face to face visit wait and see what comes to you.

    Perhaps a photo album or frame set may be better.

    Sorry for your loss.
     
  20. crisi

    crisi DIS Veteran

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    Remember, no meat and dairy on the same plate, keep the ham off the deli plate - if they are Orthodox, any food must come from a kosher source. Sausage pizza = pork and cheese = generally a bad idea.

    (Plenty of Jews don't keep kosher, but its probably most respectful to assume that they do).
     
  21. disneysteve

    disneysteve You have to enjoy life, not go

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    I agree about not sending flowers but keep in mind that living plants are just fine.
     

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