traveling with kids that are not yours

Discussion in 'Disney Cruise Line Forum' started by samoyed, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. samoyed

    samoyed Mouseketeer

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    Has anyone taken Kids that are not your on your vacation. My daughter is going to turn 16 and does not want a party she would rather take a friend and go on the cruise. But I would need the other parents to get their child a passport and I am sure I would need some document from them allowing me to take their child out of the country.

    Anybody do this before?
     
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  3. mawhite424

    mawhite424 Mouseketeer

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    there is a downloadable document on the DCL site. We travel with our grandkids, and that's what I bring along with their passports.
     
  4. neg58

    neg58 DIS Veteran

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    The forms you need to have signed are included in the paperwork Disney sends to you.

    Requiring a passport is a good idea - just easier than deciding if the birth certificate is good enough. I've also seen a recommendation for travel insurance, and I think that is a good idea too.

    My brother took my daughter to Mexico and no one ever asked for the permission paperwork.

    Nancy
     
  5. DisneyOHFan

    DisneyOHFan Livin' for Disney

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    We have brought one of my DS friends. Also, I would recommend getting his health insurance information in the event something may happen.
     
  6. LasseKjus

    LasseKjus Mouseketeer

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    Done it for 6 of the last 8 cruises. There is a form Disney will have you fill out. You should have this notarized with both the parent's signatures. Also make sure you have all the medical information and what not for the kid you're bringing. And it would be easier with a passport than a birth certificate. Chances are, they won't even look at the paperwork you bring. They haven't for us most time.

    I've only had one time where there was any "problem" in doing this and it was with my own kids who were traveling in their grandparents stateroom and we were all on the same ship. The checker-inner insisted that we have all these forms filled out and we insisted that we, our own kids' parents, were standing right there trying to board with her. This wasn't on Disney mind you, but it was a half hour of arguing that we didn't need the paperwork since she was with us, just in a different room. Eventually a supervisor came over and cleared everything up with us.
     
  7. kcashner

    kcashner DIS Veteran

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    There is a difference between what is REQUIRED and what is "best practice." The post above presents a good example of the difference.

    What is required is that you have the form supplied by DCL completed and signed by A parent. That is ONE parent. Two signatures are not required, nor is a notary (in past years, a notarized signature was needed). That is all that is required (not a passport, not a letter giving you permission to sign anything legal or medical for the minor, etc.)

    Move from that to "best practice." It is always a good thing to do those things mentioned in previous posts. A letter or documentation from both parents with a notary signature is better than a single signature. A passport is better than birth certificate.

    And yes, I'm sure that only a signature from one parent is required because we have done it.

    All of the above applies to the Bahamas and Caribbean cruises only. There may be additional requirements imposed by other countries on other cruises. For instance, Canada is known to be "sticky" or "safe" depending on one's point of view and is known for requesting more documentation.
     
  8. LasseKjus

    LasseKjus Mouseketeer

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    You have to have both parents permission. Even if you are a single parent, traveling with your own kid, you are supposed to have written permission of the second parent.
     
  9. kcashner

    kcashner DIS Veteran

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    Sorry, DCL does not require "permission" from a second parent. I have done it with a child who is not mine on just mother's signature. I am a single parent and have taken my own child all over the world as well as probably 18 DCL cruises without any other signature. Yes, the first time, I worried about it--was NEVER asked.

    Without going into all the legal issues, my child has no other parent, and never has. By law, I am her only parent. BUT, we've never had to go into that. It has never been asked and never been required by DCL. We did wait to get her passport until she was the age (14, I think) that she didn't need 2 signatures or one + court documents to get a passport.

    I'm not sure who says you are "supposed to" have written permission. Again, this gets into the area of "best practice." I don't deny for a second that it is a good idea to have a notarized permission letter from an absent parent (regardless of reason for absence). It is a good idea to have a passport. It is a good idea to carry a copy of a marriage license or proof of name change document if the names on your various IDs don't agree or if your surname differs from that of your child. But, none of the above are required, nor does DCL say that you are "supposed to" have them.

    The funny thing is that the ONLY time my daughter was ever questioned was by a Customs and Immigration agent as we were re-entering the US--they asked her who I was. Seems like the time to be concerned would be when taking a child out of the country, not re-entering.
     
  10. Candleinthewind

    Candleinthewind Mouseketeer

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    That rule was suspended in the past week by Mexico. The letter is no longer required.
     
  11. Fadog

    Fadog Mouseketeer

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    A medical power of attorney is a good idea as it allows you to make medical decisions for the child immediately, with out having to get in touch with the parents. Better safe that sorry. It's better to have all the forms just in case, even though they are rarely needed or asked for.
     
  12. manateesmom

    manateesmom Mouseketeer

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    Well, US Customs and Border Patrol says that you are supposed to have written permission. https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/de...-one-parent-or-someone-who-is-not-a-parent-or
    www.dhs.gov/how-do-i/travel-overseas

    When you re-enter the U.S., Customs can detain you until they are satisfied that they understand the circumstances of why you are traveling with a child not your own or without the written consent of both parents.
     
  13. lilpooh108

    lilpooh108 DIS Veteran

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    Thanks for the link. I had a different situation but need to know this info.
     
  14. samoyed

    samoyed Mouseketeer

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    Thanks everyone for your suggestions.. I am the kids of person that plans for everything.. (Girlscout Leader and all) so no matter if needed or not I will have all the paterwork I need to care for their child while they are in my care. And since I would be paying for the whole trip, I do not think is is unreasonable to ask the other parents to get a Passport for their child.

    Thanks again... Now I know this option is Doable... I was worried there would be too many problems to even consider a vacation like this...:cool1:
     

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