tips for landscapes anyone?

Discussion in 'Photography Board' started by jann1033, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. jann1033

    jann1033 <font color=darkcoral>Right now I'm an inch of nat

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    ok, help me out here...i want to take some nice shots on vacation...so i would like some tips on how you all do it..ie do you usually set up a tripod etc? i know the basics like get the good light, try to get interest in front mid back, rule of thirds, scout out angles...etc but i am never really happy with most of my results so what do you do to get shots you love? and i know we are going to a couple wildlife /bird refuges( yeah we are a real wild and crazy happening couple :rotfl2: ) so any tips on how to get better shots there would be much appreciated
     
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  3. LPZ_Stitch!

    LPZ_Stitch! ºoº DIS Veteran

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    Check out The Luminous Landscape ... they're probably the best landscape-focused photography site out there. They've got lots of free tips/tutorials as well as DVDs for sale.
     
  4. jann1033

    jann1033 <font color=darkcoral>Right now I'm an inch of nat

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    thanks i have been there and that is a great site..i was thinking more personal experience though. i just got a couple good landscape mags. as well but i figure maybe some of the gurus on here have something up their sleeve they do that they find really helpful..
     
  5. mabas9395

    mabas9395 I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I

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    IMO, one of the big things that sets a good landscape shot apart from a great one is the time of day the shot is taken.

    When you shoot just after sun rise or just before sun set you get a quality of lighting that you don't get any other time of day.
     
  6. MarkBarbieri

    MarkBarbieri Semi-retired

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    I'm no guru and I don't have any magic tips. Here are a few suggestions I can make, though.

    1) Get up before the crack of dawn. The best light is at sunrise. The second best light is at sunset. Obviously, doing this is easier in the winter and harder in the summer.

    2) For scouting angles, I find it best to find someone with a really big camera and follow them. Shoot what they shoot. Be aware, however, that many of them are idiots, so this doesn't always work. Seriously, if you find other serious shooters, pump them for all the info you can.

    3) Going to websites and reading books helps, but you need to practice and learn from experience. Workshops are often a great way to learn, especially if they are hands on.

    4) Join your local photography club. They can help you keep up with workshops and seminars in your area. They arrange field trips to interesting shooting locations. They can provide feedback and critiques. They are also good places to borrow equipment.

    5) Go pretty places. A monkey with a brownie can get nice shots in Butchart Gardens. It takes some serious skill to bring back beautiful shots of Dallas.

    6) As a fallback, use mediocre equipment so that you have something to blame.
     
  7. DVC Jen

    DVC Jen DIS Veteran<br><font color=blue>Wigs out even the

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    No kidding - I am 19 miles outside of Dallas and it is killin me! Gonna have to work on my "serious skill". ;) Hope I find it someday.

    Janet - I by no means have any right to give anyone serious advice - but if you see something that catches your eye - take the photo - if it doesn't turn out perfectly - spend time figuring out what you could have done to make it better - and go back (if you can). That way you at least come out of it with a great learning experience.

    I can't wait to see what you get. :goodvibes
     
  8. mabas9395

    mabas9395 I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I

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    If you don't mind having a bunch of shots that have already been taken 1,000 times before, as soon as you get to your destination, pick up a bunch of post cards and plan on shooting those scenes. That way all the hard work of finding the best subjects at the best angles has already been done.

    If you pride yourself on the originality of your photography, thats not the best advice.
     
  9. Suburbanmom

    Suburbanmom <font color=red>Oh, SNAP!<br><font color=peach>I'm

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    Don't forget your tripod. I'm no guru...but the tripod is a handy piece of equipment, one I try not to be lazy about carrying along. I also invested in a remote shutter clicker thing-y (that's the technical term).
     
  10. boBQuincy

    boBQuincy <font color=green>I am not carrying three pods<br>

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    I purchased Alain Briot's book "Mastering Landscape Photography", he writes almost as well as he photographs! The book is mostly about landscape photography and contains many very good ideas. It's a must!
     
  11. manning

    manning <font color=blue>Just for that I have requested it

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    Here is one of my so so shots. I have been away from this awhile and the eye needs to be retrained

    This is an example of framing. The foreground is the frame. Many will take this picture without it.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. jann1033

    jann1033 <font color=darkcoral>Right now I'm an inch of nat

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    i didn't know he has a book but i loved the luminous landscape articles from him you linked to once...i'll have to see if i can find this

    at least i have mark's number 6 covered:lmao: your number 2 made me laugh since i have had little point and shoot shooters do that to me, being glad they don't see my results btw:lmao: so i'm picturing a long line following some guy with a mark111 and a big white lens, kind of like one of the "predator/prey food chain" illustrations you see every now and then:rotfl2:


    thanks for your all tips though and keep em coming if you can
     

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