The second highest leading cause of death in 25 - 34 year olds: Suicide

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by FlightlessDuck, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. FlightlessDuck

    FlightlessDuck Pluto's personal nose scratcher

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    12,552
  2. Avatar

    Google AdSense Guest Advertisement


    to hide this advert.
  3. LisaR

    LisaR <img src=http://www.wdwinfo.com/images/silver.jpg>

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2000
    Messages:
    8,919
    I'm skimming a book called The Naked Roommate. It is a book on how to survive your first year as a college student. In it, there is a statistic quoted from The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control that says that suicide is the third leading cause of death for young people aged 15 - 24. Based on your statistic, things get even worse as they move into the next age group. Such sad statistics. :sad2:
     
  4. FlightlessDuck

    FlightlessDuck Pluto's personal nose scratcher

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    12,552
    The magazine article states it's the second leading cause for college students as well. Maybe it went up?
     
  5. BrerMom

    BrerMom <p><img src=http://www.wdwinfo.com/images/smilies/

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 1999
    Messages:
    1,993
    Too much pressure; too little coping skills.

    Kids thrive in middle school where the teachers are told over and over, "Never do anything that might make a student feel uncomfortable or embarrassed" and are allowed to retake quizzes until they get the grade they want (if your school doesn't, it's coming...). As a result, almost all kids earn all As and Bs.

    Kids thrive in high school where teachers are put on an improvement plan if 80% of students do not earn 80% or higher. Zero tolerance in some schools means that comments that make the student feel bad are not tolerated even if it would have been considered "positive peer pressure" in the past.

    Even our local community college has switched to the "multiple retakes are available if the grade earned wasn't the grade desired" plan.

    Freshmen often struggle in college. Are we surprised? For many of them, it's the first time they've made any major decisions by themselves - and for some, mom/dad is still choosing the college or the major. Many are sharing a room, choosing when to get up, whether to go to class, and when to do homework for the first time in their lives. We have seen so many kids, especially excellent high school student athletes, that either didn't go to college or moved back home after a year.

    When kids graduate, but can't get a job and have student loans to pay, it has be overwhelming. We, as a society, haven't taught them coping skills for life's little disappointments, so why are we surprised that they don't know how to handle the big issues?
     
  6. 4luv2cdisney

    4luv2cdisney DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    665
    Wow! We don't get retakes like that...not even close! DD14 is a HS freshman and I don't remember a single retake in middle school. Some students in one of her honors classes this year were given the opportunity to retake a test to earn back partial credit, because the highest score in the class was in the 70's. Only the students who failed could retake and could only earn a maximum 70% score. The kids who scored the highest (including my DD) didn't get to retake and earn any partial credit.

    I think she has so much stinkin' pressure as a freshman in HS these statistics do not surprise me at all. As a matter of fact, in our school district there is a long running history of HS suicide. I never fully understood the constant "suicide prevention" newsletters and meetings I was hearing about. One quarter into high school (and the death of a senior - no cause given) and it all makes sense.

    Over this Holiday "break", she had to read 2 books with 1 book report and 1 Q & A by chapter assignment, and had lengthy study guides to fill out for every class. This is all in preperation for finals, however, a few teachers are going to try and squeeze in one more unit next week before finals the week after. Sigh. I am exhausted just watching her work so hard and helping her study...every.single.day. She has teacher lead study sessions almost every day next week after school and on Saturday.

    Not to mention that it almost seems that she is expected to know what she wants to do with the rest of her life by now. When she is not stressing about getting her homework done, she is stressing about attending ACT / SAT prep classes and what her future college might require.

    I've really been bothered by this a lot lately. I think she should be pursuing her interests and hobbies right now - figuring out what she enjoys - and looking for a way to incorporate those things into a career that she'll be happy with some day. Instead, everything is focused on the all mighty dollar. How to get a scholarship and what fields pay the most money. So sad.
     
  7. Robbi

    Robbi DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    3,694
    Accidents must be number one keeping suicide in the second position. It doesn't surprise me at all. When I was in college, we knew there would be a good job waiting for us after graduation. Today, kids are going to college spending time and money only to find there are no jobs. They're left hanging. Many of them do not know how to cope with things not going their way. It's a huge shock and one they can't handle.
     
  8. penn19

    penn19 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,306
    Yes! That's how it is here. And we live in a "highly rated" district. I have told my kids for years that the schools are doing students no favors by allowing retakes. Why on earth was that even started and who was the person who thought this was a good idea. When I was in school if you got an F it was your F. Maybe next time study harder etc....but now the kids don't have to worry about being prepared because if they fail a test they can retake it for a higher grade.
    Wait until they get into the real world. How many "retakes" do you get on your job before they let you go?
     
  9. Albort

    Albort ODV Crew

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    7,434
    College Fees are just ridiculous now... $3k-$4k in fees, $1k for books, parking per year is like $1k+ now too.
     
  10. TinkerBelled

    TinkerBelled DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    936
    I take the point about pressure, but I think this statistic has more to do with medical advances than anything else. This is generally a healthy group to begin with, and with cures for many things that, even thirty years ago, might have been fatal, there aren't many cause-of-death options left.
     
  11. pigletgirl

    pigletgirl <font color=green>You do have a life. It is just i

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2006
    Messages:
    13,297
    It isn't just that...

    Depression and mental illness are REAL, just like any other chronic thing, diabetes, asthma, etc. Sometimes "coping skills" ARE NOT enough. What we need are good mental health programs in place so people CAN get help if they feel like they're going to hurt themselves or someone else.

    I wish more people understood mental illness.
     
  12. ZachnElli

    ZachnElli <font color=green>Is it Spring yet?<br><font color

    Joined:
    May 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,482
    I agree 100%! This is a lot more than getting to retake tests or not.

    This quote is from the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention:
    90% of people who die by suicide have a diagnosable and treatable psychiatric disorder at the time of their death.

    Afsp.org
     
  13. Robbi

    Robbi DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    3,694
    Not being able to cope and feeling they have no control over their lives can lead to anxiety and depression. In certain individuals it becomes overwhelming and suicide seems like the only viable option.

    My son's friend committed suicide. He had been seeing a therapist, taking meds, etc. for at least a couple of years prior.

    He was an extremely handsome and intelligent young man who was top dog on both his high school and college campuses. After graduation, he could not find a job that he felt suited his talents. It was terribly hard for him to accept that those in the outside world were more or less immune to his looks, his intelligence and his charming personality. It was heartbreaking.
     
  14. pigletgirl

    pigletgirl <font color=green>You do have a life. It is just i

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2006
    Messages:
    13,297
    I am very sorry to hear that.:sad1:

    The majority of cases though, are people who haven't received anything, perhaps out of shame or not telling someone what they're going through. My friend was a senior in high school when she committed suicide. When her parents found her, there were two bottles of Ever-clear around her and at the hospital they called it. They had NO IDEA. Straight A student, had quite the community, and here parents are well known in the area.

    Looking back, they had thought of many different times when she wasn't herself but did nothing about it. I am still so very sad she's gone. She definitely left an imprint on my heart.:sad1:

    I guess the moral of this is people need to be more aware, and then get if need be. Of course there are those that are going to be missed, but mental illness needs more awareness, and to also break away from stereotypes that the media and others have portrayed.
     
  15. FlightlessDuck

    FlightlessDuck Pluto's personal nose scratcher

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    12,552
    I don't even know where to begin with either of these opinions. I'm just dumbfounded that this is a reaction to the issue of suicide in the under 35 set.
     
  16. a1tinkfans

    a1tinkfans Spreading Some Pixie Dust Today!

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,054
    regarding the comments about middle school and the grades...it does seem our society of late is instant gratification and one of "everyone wins a prize"
    but I dont think that should be the focus...
    the focus should be on mental illness, recognizing it, coping strategies, and accepting it without stigma.
    Suicide can be prevented and it is devastating and beyond sad...
    one of our local HS students is no longer with us after first semester away at college...
    It scares the heck out of me...the pressures, the mounting debts, the decrease in jobs afterward....its just one area that compounded with depression can have a dire consequence.....
    sorry to hear of this latest statistic :sad2:.
     
  17. LisaR

    LisaR <img src=http://www.wdwinfo.com/images/silver.jpg>

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2000
    Messages:
    8,919
    Anyone know what the suicide rate was back in the 60's, 70's or 80's?

    I didn't know anyone during my high school/college years that committed suicide. My DD (17) knows three different people who took their own lives. So sad.

    I believe it stems from mental illness. I am just wondering how those with mental illness dealt with it "back in the day." Maybe the suicide rate was just as high and I was just lucky enough to have friends that didn't go down that road.
     
  18. Acklander

    Acklander DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2004
    Messages:
    5,518
    I think another thing driving up the numbers in that age bracket is the military and veterans. The number of suicides coming from the armed forces has been staggering.
     
  19. penn19

    penn19 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,306
    Sorry that I gave the impression that I was saying suicide was based on retakes. Not at all. I was agreeing with the pp and there was another pp who said that it wasn't like that at her dd school.

    I am not quAlified to say why so many suicides or are there more now then back in the dAy.

    Continue on with the thread.......
     
  20. BrerMom

    BrerMom <p><img src=http://www.wdwinfo.com/images/smilies/

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 1999
    Messages:
    1,993
    Of course the ability to retake or not retake tests does not cause suicides. :scared1: It was merely an example of what I see daily: I am worried that we are not helping our kids learn how to deal with disappointment because we protect them from feeling disappointed, almost at all costs. Obviously I feel strongly that if we could help kids learn to handle disappointment at a younger age, they might be able to handle the triggers for depression, etc., better.

    Think about your child's school. What is the ratio for counselors to students? And I'd be willing to bet that actually counseling kids one-on-one is a very small percentage of their required duties.
     
  21. ILUVALASKA

    ILUVALASKA DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2002
    Messages:
    576
    This thread really hits home with our family. My son attends a very difficult, highly-rated private university in Pittsburgh. One week before finals in mid-December, his friend in the computer science program committed suicide. The boy was the most well-rounded, optimistic and happy go-lucky guy on campus. Everyone is still shocked. No warning, no signs. Scary stuff when your children are thousands of miles away in college. These schools can be real pressure cookers. The workload is out of control.
     

Share This Page