Tell me about the exit row seats

Discussion in 'Transportation' started by hinodis, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. hinodis

    hinodis DIS Veteran

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    Delta changed our flight time and we ended up on another flight. The only seats that were available were in economy comfort on the exit row. I have only had a window seat when flying and I am very worried about these seats. I had to pay an extra $19.00 for them, then read on seat guru that that don't recline:confused: Isn't that a selling point for these seats? How are the exit row seats? No window I will assume.:faint:
     
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  3. AllyBri

    AllyBri DIS Veteran

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    I always liked the exit row, much more room.
     
  4. sam_gordon

    sam_gordon DIS Veteran

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    Yes, exit row seats do have a window, but they'll look directly over the wing. I didn't know there were "economy comfort" exit row seats. I'm not positive about the recline.
     
  5. Jestocost

    Jestocost DIS Veteran

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    All of this depends on the specific row and type of aircraft. If you've checked Seat Guru for your exact airline, equipment and seat, then you should have accurate information.

    On some planes you may not have a window per se in the exit row as there is a gap between the seat and the exit on the side of the plane (check the configuration on some 737s). Also, any seats in front of any exit row will have limited or no recline, so on a plane where there are two exit rows the first of the two may not recline. Exit row seats also typically do not have movable armrests as the tray tables fold up out of the armrest instead of down from the seat back in front of them.

    The reason there is a premium price on exit row seats is that they do offer one of the most sought-after features on a plane; extra leg room.
     
  6. anonymousegirl

    anonymousegirl DIS Veteran

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    There are some restrictions to the exit rows--no children under age 16, no one requiring seat beat extenders, and all passengers in that row must demonstrate adequate English language proficiency. Also, every passenger must agree to help in the event of an emergency so often elderly passengers are not seated there under the assumption that they will not have the upper body strength to open the heavy emergency wing door.
     
  7. rwdavis2

    rwdavis2 DIS Veteran

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    Just last year I saw a woman and her son relocated because he was not old enough. This was on United and had probably paid extra to be in the exit row.
     
  8. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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    This was her fault. When you select exit row seats on UA, you receive a warning listing the rules for occupying these seats, and you have to agree to the terms. Elite FFs don't pay for exit row seats (they can chose these seats at varying times before the flight, depending on FF level).
     
  9. rwdavis2

    rwdavis2 DIS Veteran

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    I'm guessing she though she could skate by. The kid almost looked old enough. The flight attendant asked him specifically.
     
  10. bumbershoot

    bumbershoot DIS Veteran

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    Is anyone else out there feeling like the OP probably shouldn't have had to pay for those seats if they were the ONLY ones available? Does anyone know?
     
  11. Anal Annie

    Anal Annie at least I KNOW I'm a kook...I just can't help it

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    That was my first thought. If the airline changed their flight and they had to take new seats then the airline should eat that cost as it's not their fault...
     
  12. DebbieB

    DebbieB DIS Veteran

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    There are other seats held for airport check-in that you don't see. If those are the only seats left at the airport, they will get them for free.
     
  13. anonymousegirl

    anonymousegirl DIS Veteran

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    It really depands on the scenario. Were these seats the only seats available at that time? Or the only two seats together? When was she looking? Often seats are under airport control and can only be assigned either 24 in advance or at the airport itself.
    Why was the flight cancelled? Weather? Mechanical failure? Heck, I had a airplane commandeered by the US military. You can bet your last dollar the airline did nothing for us except book us on the next flight. No meal vouchers, phone calls (pre-cell phone and internet days). In fact, they assigned seats on the next flight that did not exist. I got row 50 (last row) and there were people with row 51.
     
  14. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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    +1.

    Seat will be assigned at the airport the day of flight if none are available when purchasing or later.
     
  15. Sandi

    Sandi A proud Spartans fan.

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    I think the FAA requirement is that you be at least 15 years of age. As soon as DD was old enough, we jumped on those seats!

    FAA Required Emergency Exit Row Qualifications
    When you are seated in an exit row, you may be called upon to open the exit and assist fellow passengers in exiting the aircraft if a crew member is unavailable to do so.

    Because of this, and for the benefit of all passengers, Federal Law requires that passengers seated in the exit row MAY NOT fall into any of the following categories

    •You lack sufficient mobility, strength or dexterity in both arms and hands, and both legs to:
    ◦reach upward, sideways, and downward to the location of emergency exit and exit slide operating mechanisms;
    ◦grasp and push, pull, turn, or otherwise manipulate those mechanisms;
    ◦push, shove, pull, or otherwise open emergency exits;
    ◦lift out, hold, deposit on nearby seats, or maneuver over the seatbacks to the next row, objects the size and weight of over-wing exit doors;
    ◦remove obstructions similar to size and weight of over-wing exit doors, all while maintaining balance;
    ◦exit expeditiously, stabilize the escape slide after deployment, and assist those getting off the slide.
    •You lack the ability to read and understand instructions related to emergency evacuation provided by Alaska Airlines in printed or graphic form or the ability to understand oral crewmember commands.
    •You lack sufficient visual capacity to perform one or more of the applicable functions without the assistance of visual aids beyond contact lenses or eyeglasses.
    •You lack sufficient aural capacity to hear and understand instructions shouted by flight attendants, without assistance beyond a hearing aid.
    •You lack the ability to adequately impart information orally to other passengers.
    •You have a nondiscernible condition that might prevent you from performing these functions or a condition that might cause you to suffer bodily harm while performing these functions.
    •You do not wish to perform these instructions.
    •You are less than 15 years of age or lack the capacity to perform one or more of the applicable functions without the assistance of an adult parent, adult relative, or adult companion.
    •You have a responsibility, such as a child under 15 years old, unless a second parent is seated elsewhere with the child.
     
  16. Shelly F - Ohio

    Shelly F - Ohio Disney Extraordinaire

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    Love the exit row especially if I get the seat that does not have a seat if front of it - gotta love the extra leg room.
     
  17. KrazeeK120

    KrazeeK120 DIS Veteran

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    I LOVE exit row. The extra room is sooooo nice. On 2 trips, I got them for free at the airport. On my most recent trip, I went ahead and paid for them in advance (on Allegiant, it's only $1 more per person, per way).

    The chances of us actually having to use the doors is practically nothing - either the flight will go exactly as designed, or it will crash and we'll be dead. (Morbid thought...but it's the truth.) However, I'd be plenty willing to help if, for some reason, we needed to evacuate the plane.
     
  18. trstno1

    trstno1 Never look back darling. It detracts from the now.

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    Oops, cancel this post. I didn't read the first post very well.
     
  19. jsilvers

    jsilvers DIS Veteran

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    Actually, it isn't. Studies have found that 90%+ of airline accidents are survivable. But because many - if not most - fatalities in an otherwise survivable accident are caused by post-crash fire, it is extremely important that anyone seated in the exit row takes their responsibilities seriously. The slightest delay in getting the emergency exit open can have life-or-death consequences.

    For a slightly-dated NTSB report on this subject, see http://www.ntsb.gov/doclib/safetystudies/SR0101.pdf. An excerpt:

    Because a public perception is that aviation accidents are not survivable, the Safety Board also examined the proportion of occupants who survived in each accident for the period 1983 through 2000. Contrary to public perception, the most likely outcome of an accident is that most people survive. In 528 of the 568 accidents (93.0 percent), more than 80 percent of the occupants survived (figure 3). Accidents that result in complete or near complete loss of life, such as TWA flight 800, account for a small percentage of all accidents. Only 34 of the 568 accidents (5.9 percent) resulted in fewer than 20 percent of the occupants surviving.
     
  20. KrazeeK120

    KrazeeK120 DIS Veteran

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    Wow! I never knew that! Well like I said, I am willing and able to help if we needed to evacuate the plane for some reason, as is my DH.

    I do think that most flights probably go as designed though and do not require usage of emergency equipment.
     
  21. DebbieB

    DebbieB DIS Veteran

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    That reminded me of the plane that crashed in Toronto where over 300 people were evacuated in less than 2 minutes and all survived before it went up completely in flames.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_France_Flight_358

    Also think about "Miracle on the Hudson", where all escaped, people were standing on the wings, they escaped through the exit row windows.
     

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