question for those with service dogs

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by mistysue, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. mistysue

    mistysue DIS Veteran

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    When you take a service dog to Disney, if you stay on-site they stay in the room with you, correct? Are you able to stay in any regular room? (as in there aren't "assigned" rooms where individuals with dogs go?)

    I ask because DS is very allergic to dogs and I am going to ask for a deep cleaning for our room, but I want to have a good mental list of things that may be causing him reactions so I can figure out what it is if he gets sick. If it's not even an option that a dog would have been in our room I want it to be off my worry list.
    He has started to break out on days my brother brings his dog to my office even if I wash my hands after I pet him and hours have gone by before I go home... :worried:
     
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  3. disney david

    disney david DIS Veteran

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    Just be aware Disney use bed bug dogs to patrol Disney resorts three full time dogs not saying they been in every room but you never know or will Disney if they inspected a room you giving. The deep clean a good I idea and I don't think their any specific rooms they give a person with a service dog unless they pick ones on ground floor to give them a quicker way to get to a relief area.


    I bring up the bed bug dogs just to show their might be a dog in a room other then a service dog not to scare anyone Disney is very proactive and work hard to prevent bed bugs.
     
  4. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    Service Dogs do stay in the room with the person they are teamed with.
    There are no specific rooms assigned for guests traveling with Service Dogs, so thy could be staying in any room.
     
  5. jmartinez1895

    jmartinez1895 DIS Veteran

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    When you call and ask for the cleaning be sure to ask for a new air filter.
     
  6. gilesmt

    gilesmt DIS Veteran

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    I just wanted to make a fast comment, that although there are always exception to the rules, most people who are allergic to dogs do not have trouble with trained at school dogs, at least that is what the study shows. That is one thing they teach us in the school when we live their for a month. We learn to brush and care for our dogs so that dander is very minimum.

    That being said, we are also taught that dogs don't go on beds and other things, and my dog would never be left unattended in a room all day. And just this past month I have seen where people have done that at Disney (against Disney and ADA laws), so I can see why you would be afraid, there are some service dogs who do need to be in the bed with the disabled, and that is why I told someone recently to make sure the hotel knows that is required, because then they hopefully will but two mattress covers on, or a plastic cover barrier, and such.

    Just to let others know, we with service dogs do try, at dlr I asked the maid into my room and told her where the dog slept and said I would vacuum on last day if needed and she said no, she would make sure that a special vacuum did the room, since then I try to catch each hotel maid and at least let them know the area of the dog and my dog never gets on hotel bes, (now my bed at my house is a different story, she is only a baby).
     
  7. mistysue

    mistysue DIS Veteran

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    Thanks everyone.
    I know in most cases dogs that are groomed more are a little easier on people which is probably very helpful for most. DS has been reacting to a dog that is bathed every couple days, has short hair and is supposed to be "ok" for people with allergies. Then he isn't even directly in contact with the dog on top of that.
    I'm thinking I may take his sleeping bag with us to narrow down the possibilities. After I posted this I realized he isn't used to their bedding, water or detergent anyways. This boy gets a rash from everything- we are constantly getting glares from other parents for taking our "sick" kid out in public.

    That is interesting about the bed bug dogs- that is a good idea! Also thank you for the air filter tip!
     
  8. jmartinez1895

    jmartinez1895 DIS Veteran

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    I think I would bring bedding or a sleeping bag. It sound like you poor little guy is very sensitive and it would be awful to break out while on vacation just because of the sheets. I hope that you all have a great trip.
     
  9. MSSANDRA

    MSSANDRA DIS Veteran

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    DS is also allergic to dogs though not to the extent that your DS is. Remember that "companion" dogs are also allowed at WDW and many do not get the care or discipline that most service dogs may get. Not really many answers. Remember not to let him touch the carpet, for sure ask for a deep cleaning and maybe take your own sheets and blanket. Prayers for a reaction free trip!
     
  10. disney david

    disney david DIS Veteran

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    Let say they deep clean your room but a service dog staying down the hallway will that be a problem or is it more prolonged exposure to pet dander or if their staying next to your room. Would you be okay walking to your room if a dog staying on the floor not sure which resort I know the board walk inn their a cam that like shampooing the carpets but not sure about other resorts. So when you check in reconfirm with them about the deep cleaning and make sure they do it I would call the day before you leave so they can make sure it noted.
     
  11. gilesmt

    gilesmt DIS Veteran

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    Just a thought but he could be allergic to the shampoo the dog is using, it is not good for a dog to be bathed that often, they recommend three times a year at most. Mind jump in the river almost daily, but it is clean so I usually only use shampoo on my dog twice a year if that, u less they get into something that does not come off with water. Just a thought check out the shampoo.
     
  12. gilesmt

    gilesmt DIS Veteran

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    Really companion dogs are allowed in Disney? I never knew that, why? There is no law allowing that? No wonder I "see" so many unservice dogs at Disney. There web site clearly states service animals, not companion dogs.

    Also it clearly states that only service dogs not companion dogs are allowed in Disney hotels. Many people claim there companion dog is a service dog, but by law and by Disney policy they are not allowed, I could be mistaking but the hotels are always told about my dog and they always state, is he a service dog, and I state yes. I am positive that if I said not she is a companion dog they would tell me she could not stay at hotel and I would be directed to the on site kennels for her comfort and convience.
     
  13. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    Disney's website and all their literature says "Service Dogs". There are no provisions that I have ever heard of for "companion dogs" being allowed to stay at WDW hotels or come to the parks (other than an occassional celebrity who insists on bringing their 'purse dog'.

    This may sound a bit strange, but the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) handles Service Dogs like adaptive equipment. The dog has no rights to be in a place; the person with a disability that the dog is providing services for has rights to have their dog with them to provide the service.

    This is from the ADA link I posted earlier in this thread:
    Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the persons disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.
     
  14. MSSANDRA

    MSSANDRA DIS Veteran

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    Well hopefully I am wrong. There however, was a recent thread addressing the merging of the term Companion/Service Dogs. I agree that is would be incredibly difficult for WDW to undisguised the difference. It was pointed out that the "service dog vest" can be purchased on line and require no proof to wear. Sad and wrong but perhaps the reason we saw tons more dogs on our last trip than ever before and while I do know and understand that many of these small non-traditional dogs do serve a very important purpose, it does sometimes make you say, wow...when you do see sooooo many of them in the park. I assumed if they are in the parks, they would also be allowed in the resort room. Hope this in not the case as some of these dogs we say had rather long dog hair that really would set my, and many kids off.
     
  15. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    If the thread was on this board, I remember it and it was not about merging the term, but about people bringing Companion Dogs and claiming they were Service Dogs. So, kind of the opposite.
    Many people in the general public don't understand the distinction and think thy are the same.

    The ADA is very specific that "Companion Dogs" are not Service Dogs. It was recently updated to make it MORE specific on what constitutes a Service Dog (and removed most other animals from being able to be called Service Animals).

    Do some people pawn off their "Companion Dogs" as Service Dogs?
    Certainly.
    In fact, in the past, there was an active poster for a year or two who talked a lot about her "Service Dog" , and the service she said it provided was sitting and letting her pet it when she was anxious. That is specifically called out in the ADA as NOT being a 'service or task' because the dog does not require any training and is not doing anything.
    She specifically posted on most SD threads and said she encouraged people to pet her dog because it helped 'educate them about service dogs' and calmed her to see others pet her dog. She was not sympathetic to people with Service Dogs who did not want their dogs petted because they were actually working.

    That is a good example of someone calling their companion dog a "Service Dog" when it is not.
     
  16. gilesmt

    gilesmt DIS Veteran

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    I think we have seen the start of the service dog dilemma, as in the past, 20 or so years ago, I remember going to Disney with my daughter who has cp, at that time she was in a w/c. I remember how we where treated, this was when the charactors just happened to walk around and greet people, I remember after a day or two I gave up trying to get the w/c closer, and would just stand back and let her see but not attempt to get close. My other dd would run up she was 2 1/2 or so and once it was her turn she would pull the character over to my dd, after once or twice of this I remember the cast members would just make it a point to come over and greet her and tell the other kids to wait a moment. I also remember there was no line at POTC and splash or space. We saw no more than three or four w/c's. then BOOM, Disney goes out buys w/c's and now we have tons and tons of post complaining about w/c's getting up front access, which is not true and people using w/c's that don't need them.

    As I said I have a case load of 375 children with autism in an agency that serves over 2000 children and well over 100000 adults, and honestly not one person has a service dog for autism. I have meet one hearing dog in my life (if you count them all maybe three), my cousin is deaf and has had what I would call a service dog but he does not call it that, he gets his dogs from the pound, he trains them, they alert him to a door bell, but also sit in the car and alerts him to fire, police and other sirens. To me that is a service dog, he lives in a big city back east. I have a husband who also has a certified service dog that the va gave him, he paid something for it. He has a vest and all, my ex has not brought that dog into public places, he sits in the car and stuff. My ex has PTSD. I myself am blind and I have and know of may guide dogs. I am in the face of the disabled community daily with autism and blindness, I go to the va constantly, even though I am divorced it is the weirdest divorce we live eight doors apart and spend a lot of time still together, I just can not live with him, need my own quiet retreat away from him:rotfl2:( don't all married women). I have seen very few service dogs in my line of work in comparison to how many clients I have served over the years.

    I also know for a fact how expensive it is for a certified service dog, for autism here, the two schools that will work in our state (they are not in our state), will charge $10,000 for the dog, $5,000 has to come from the family and the other $5,000 can be from a friend or a fund raiser. There is a two year wait list at lie ask and you do not have any guarentee that the dog will work for you, no refunds, one dog that is it. You have to think about the life of a dog, working life is about 6 to 8 years, I have no parent that is willing to pay that much for a dog and not get a guarantee.

    I have been to school to get my dog where people have been 6, 8 even 10 times. A blind person to get a cute little dog gives up one full month of vacation or sick leave ever 6 years or so to get a new dog and retire the old dog. One full month away from family and friends, one full month in a dorm room, one full month eating food that is like cafeteria food, and not what you want, one full month of literally being video taped and watched every second except when in your bedroom. It is a grooming experience.

    My ex to get his dog, was placed in a va home for two years. He had to get to a point he could handle himself before the dog, he was giving the dog about three months before he was released. And still he does not use his dog in public, he says and is correct that he can not handle her in public, he can handle himself knowing she is close and he can go back to her soon, so he have never brought her into public, except parks. The school worked with him on it, but he is adamant not to do it, and since there is a huge change in him, he has a responsibility that he has to get up and move than his dog is a life saver, and even if he treats her as a companion she is truly needed by him.

    I know of one dog that has been trained by the owner, or I should say was trained for the owner, he is blind and he hired someone to buy and train his dog from a puppy,he said he paid about $15,000 for the training of the puppy for two years and his dog is just like any other guide dog.

    Why do I say all this, because those of us who need a service animal, either pay the price of a well trained dog, or pay the price in our time out of life to get our well trained dogs. I know there are exceptions, like my cousin, but he is not bringing his dog into public, his dog is used and is by definition a service animal, but used in his home or in his car, he has never brought his dog to work or out on the town. I know and want to protect the rights of those who train there own dogs, to do a service, but I also want to protect the safety of pets. A pet, companion dog, therapy dog, does not belong in Disney. Do you know, at least in my state that a police officer with a canine has to go away to training for 3 months, again give up his life and family for three months.

    Even the best well trained, well behaved service dog with a long relationship with his owner, and a long history of working together, will have a hard time at Disney. You are virtually taking a toddler, who can not speak, and has no protection on there feet to a place to walk and be distracted for many days. How many of you will take the shoes off your toddler, throw away their carriage and take away their voice and walk them thru Disney for 10 days, anyone. How many of you think this is cruel and unusual punishment for a toddler. I think personally it is the same punishment for a dog. Those of us who have service dogs plan for weeks and months about the dog care while there.

    I go in may, in the last two weeks I have spoken to the school my dog comes from three times about my plan, and what they think. I have set up kennel care for every day I am there even if we do not need it, and I explained to them that we may not, but I have to know it is there if we do. I had to budget that into my expenses. I also had to budget into the expense of the taxi over to drop her off and pick her up daily, just incase I do need the main kennels. I have had to make arrangements with the plane, she has flown several times, but not for 7 hours, we have one stop, only 30 minutes, the airline has to have someone at that end to get us off the plane, gets us to a potty place and get us back on the plane in 30 minutes, it all has to be worked out before we go. I also have to figure out eating, I can not feed her before she goes on the plane, upset stomach and all, you have to think she is on the floor squeezed in under a seat, not comfortable for her for 7 hours. But if I don't feed her she will be trying to get food from the floor, so if a toddler is around it can be a lot more hassle so I have to try to make it work for toddlers and dog. I have to think of how to carry a water dish and bottled water while in the park, heavy after a while and I can't give her park water, just like a human don't want her sick on vacation. I have to figure out how to get ten days of dog food to the hotel, heavy if I have to carry it. All of this is just the planning for the dog. I also have to tell the hotel, and ask for what I may need there and let them know where she will sleep and all so they can clean properly.

    Point is most service animal owners do everything they can to protect there dog. We don't hide them in our purse. We don't buy a vest on line. We don't wipe out our card and say he is a service dog because we want to protect the rights of those who do not have school trained dogs. We work out and budget for all expenses. We talk to the school. And then we go to Disney and many use the kennels at least some of the day.

    I can tell you from personal knowledge that these is not that many true service animals in Disney, by the law or by ADA definition. There are a lot of unservice dogs their. Now that their is a kennel at the exits of all big rides. There will b many many more u service dogs. Just like w/c in asking and getting our rights, we as a class action, we also opened the door for more and more unservice dogs to be in the park. Anyone can lie to get a w/c and any one can lie to get a service dog in. So I will constantly advocate for pets, companions and therapy dogs as well as not needed service dogs to not go to the park. My ex does not need his service dog at the park so she stays home. I believe sue said her dd service dog stays home also. I had to budget $2,000 for my service dog to go on our trip in may, if not needed fine I get a bonus, If needed it is there and my dog is safe.

    Disclaimer, I am not saying every service dog needs thousands of dollars worth of training, or all need a school. I am truly trying to protect those rights. To me and I could be wrong, I think in my mind if a person in a w/c needs a dog to pick up things or open doors, or pull a w/c, I would think they could train them themselves and it would not cost a lot. Those are things dogs have been doing a long time, pickup newspapers, pulling carts.

    I am saying, if someone who for 30 years has worked in the disabled community has not really run into service dogs daily or even monthly, then I can make a claim that Disney should not have more than a few service dogs a week. Dlr, maybe a few more, but many of those dogs will be there for a day not a vacation because, they have at least one school that has lots of puppy trainers right near them.
     
  17. mistysue

    mistysue DIS Veteran

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    It was the recent number of dog questions that inspired this question.
    Luckily, DS isn't going to die from dog contact, I just like to avoid him being all full of hives and itchy. His skin cracks and bleeds, so he sort of starts to look scary if he runs into too many things, but he lives.
    The soap used on the dog is a good question- that would be great news. Our lives were more fun when I could give him benadryl, he would rub his eyes twice and it was out of his system. This is the only dog he's had even 2nd hand contact with in the last year.
    I hope he doesn't react if somebody nearby has a dog, but honestly we really don't know. His body is crazy right now. Two years ago he wasn't allergic to anything, now we have to think twice about every single place we try to go. He came home from preschool with hives all over his face the other day because the other kids had an egg hunt- nobody even opened any of them and he was too afraid to touch them.

    I'm sorry for those of you who have to deal with people and "pretend" service dogs. I couldn't imagine faking something like that. I thought it sounded strange how some of these threads make them sound so common, but around town I have maybe seen a dozen of them in my entire life. (they seem to train some at our mall, but I'm not counting those)
     
  18. gilesmt

    gilesmt DIS Veteran

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    I had to laugh, not to belittle your sons allergy but it brought back a memory from my school days. Quite by accident I realized after eating tiny tarts one day that I broke out in a rash. So what did this poor blind girl do, she ate tiny tarts before every math test for the next three years and was sent to the nurses office and sent home. It took them three years to figure out what I was doing. My dad was not to pleased and neither was my bottom. Who would have known that that little girl who hated math would grow up to hold 4 masters degrees. Again not to belittle what trama allergies can be, but sometimes it does help to have them, at least until they catch on and tell your dad.
     
  19. mistysue

    mistysue DIS Veteran

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    That's hilarious. I would expect that sort of issue with my son if he didn't have so many things he reacted to. As is, we never know how much of anything he will need or how bad the reaction will be so he is just afraid of everything. As things are now we can just be hanging out having a normal evening and then "hey, honey, did Gabe just... walk into the wall... oh.. wait..." and suddenly he is just laying on the floor dizzy and itching from god knows what. Unfortunately for him, once the daycare started to see it everybody's first response is allergy instead of illness.
    Besides him nobody near us has allergies so we wouldn't have picked up on something like that either. He's the random allergy person on the family tree. Our families don't even have seasonal allergies.
     
  20. KPeveler

    KPeveler Moderator Moderator

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    Also something to consider - there are going to be service dogs in all Disney venues (at least at some point in the past!) and service dogs ARE allowed on ride vehicles (some of them). Obviously Disney is not going to make you ride with a dog (one of the parties will just wait for another vehicle), but it is possible that you may be in a vehicle or show area that had a dog in it earlier in the day. Would this cause problems? Dogs are almost always going to be on the floor, but their owners would understandably have dog hair on them and their hands.

    I doubt this would cause any major problems but I suggest you keep a big thing of wet wipes in your bag/pocket and have him wipe his hands frequently. That way you can avoid problems (especially since there are all the cooties in the world at Disney anyway!)

    Are you flying to Disney? Many airlines (if not most) allow pets in the cabin, not just service dogs. This allergy sounds severe enough that if you are flying, you should call the airline and say you need a dog-free flight (not sure how this works if a person requires a service dog on the same plane - there has been a TON of debate about that on the boards, and I really am trying not to open that can on worms!) I mean to help you avoid people traveling with animals who are pets.

    Hope this helps.
     
  21. disney david

    disney david DIS Veteran

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    I am not trying to argue with you or start any of the argument threads which happen in the past just wanted to point out other things that the op might not think about or even if everything is done to prevent the allergies just to have something the op and airline has no control over.


    Your right but what happens if the plane they use for their flight had a dog on it on the flight before plus if that be a problem then most airports have place dogs TSA has dogs at most airports. So even if they could do a dog free flight they my not be able to do anything about the terminal or if an officer wants to have their dog inspect the area your sitting in. And they get close before you let them know not that they won't stop but might let you leave before the dog get close. Orlando airport has dogs from Orlando pd TSA and cbp TSA could randomly pick airplanes to inspect and the airline can't stop them so every steps they may take might get ruined.
     

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