Policy about size of scooters on buses

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by KPeveler, Sep 29, 2010.

  1. KPeveler

    KPeveler Moderator Moderator

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    I would definitely have him try and practice with the scooters in malls or supermarkets and Target/Walmart before you go. An ECV may be perfect for him, but he would need to transfer out to almost every ride, which he may find difficult from some scooters. Some scooters, I am not sure what models, have a chair that swivels to the side. This may be especially helpful for transferring. I would ask in an independent thread about things like that - there may be other people who have experiences with strokes and scooters and have good ideas.

    He will need to be able to control the scooter safely in a crowded environment, so I would suggest he practice in Target or someplace like it before he gets there. This will give him a better idea of how hard it is going to be, and what he may be looking for in a scooter.

    Something else to note is that scooters, unlike powerchairs, so not have lap belts and the arms are really not meant to keep a person "in." If his balance is such that he may fall from the scooter seat, you may want to consider renting a wheelchair, which will have more substantial sides.
     
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  3. dansamy

    dansamy DIS Veteran

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    Sorry, I was editing while you were posting!

    His sitting balance is good. Transferring sometimes requires assistance to stand. Sometimes not. At this point, his primary deficit is his lack of strength and motor control of his left leg and balance on that left leg. While in the hospital, he had a pretty significant loss of muscle tissue and even had foot drop on that left side. He's definitely got a ways to go...

    And he's not even 39 yet. In high school superlatives, he was voted "Most Likely to End Up In A Body Cast".
     
  4. KPeveler

    KPeveler Moderator Moderator

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    The first time I ever used a scooter, I went full tilt into a movie rack in Target. First time I ever used a powerchair (which I do NOT suggest for your husband), I ran into the wall of a bathroom stall, and left a sizable dent.

    I heartily suggest, as someone who has been there before, that he try out a scooter at target, just to get the hang of it before getting to the parks. If he feels like he is holding up the family while trying to tour, or makes mistakes and gets embarrassed, it will make the trip both more difficult and less pleasant. We all know that men make the best patients, but perhaps giving him a headstart in this area would not be a bad thing.

    Also, the scooters you rent in the area will be smaller and easier to turn than the ones in Target, so if he can get used to one of those once or twice, he will have far fewer problems in Florida.
     
  5. Cheshire Figment

    Cheshire Figment <font color=red><marquee behavior=alternate>Friend

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    A side comment is that the Dream Scooter is designed for people over 400 pounds. A standard ECV will go up to 350 or 400, depending on the model, and most of the transport (lightweight) have an upper limit of 200 or 250 pounds.
     
  6. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    The company that rents the Dream Scooter still lists it on their website as being acceptable for buses - but, as was pointed out already, it is larger than the spaces allowed for scooters or wheelchairs under the ADA.
    The last time I had contact with someone from that company was when I wrote the post about them not being allowed on the buses with lifts. They do weigh more than the average heavy duty scooter and some bus drivers have told me that the Dream scooter with rider exceed the safe weight limit for some of the ramps. So, there may be some buses it is allowed on and others not.
    The reason I have been given by bus drivers for not allowing them on buses with lifts is that they are too long and too heavy and were damaging the lifts.

    Because it is both significantly longer and significantly wider than most ECVs and wheelchairs, I would suggest not considering it for someone unless they have a great deal of experience driving a scooter.
    Most first time users already have a difficult time driving the scooter in the queues, which are mostly around 36 inches wide. Adding a scooter that is not that much narrower than the queue makes it even more of a challenge.
     
  7. Windjammermay

    Windjammermay Earning My Ears

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    :confused3Has the bus boarding changed. I am in a Q6000z. Do we still load first and off last. ANd are we suppose to wait in the lines at the park with the rest of the people to load onto the bus.
     
  8. KPeveler

    KPeveler Moderator Moderator

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    You will have no problems getting a 6000z onto the bus, unless you have specialty equipment that makes it super long (I am thinking permanently elevated leg rests or something, not something small like a vent).

    The changes in boarding only applies to devices that are longer than the ADA prescribes. I know your chair is fine as I have the Quantum 600 and our chairs are roughly the same size.

    As to who boards first - that depends entirely on which line you are talking about. I have heard some resorts have created wheelchair accessible lines which you wait in until a certain point. I am not sure which places still use these. Also, I think some of the lines require you to be able to manipulate a gate on your own (to exit the line to wait where wheelchairs do), so if you are traveling alone, this may be a concern. Hopefully others can chime in on this one, since I haven't been to WDW since the changes.

    When your bus pulls up, whether you waited in a line before that or not, you should board first, for safety reasons. You will exit last. Wheelchairs board in the center door of the buses, while walkies board in the front door. Depending on the size and make up of your party, they may board with you in the center door or go through the front door. Most buses are newer ramp buses, which are SO much easier. Some of the older buses are lift buses.

    Hope this helps some. I am not sure about exactly how the line thing is working now, so hopefully others here have some more answers.
     
  9. Windjammermay

    Windjammermay Earning My Ears

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    This will be my 5th year going to DWD. Last year I was at the Magic Kindom and it was late so you know the lines were long. I was told to stay in the line with the rest of the people and not use the HP boarding line.

    They told me that we are to use the regualar line to board. I had my own chair with me. I just wondered if they had a new way of boarding. Use in chairs to wait in the line or go to the HP line like before. :confused3

    I must say that my Q6000z is a perfect fit for every thing. I had no problems with the rides or transprotation. The big coaches gave me a little trouble. I just had to manuver more to get on.
     
  10. kimsuenew

    kimsuenew DIS Veteran

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    Thank you for such an informative thread! :goodvibes
     
  11. MikeS.

    MikeS. I LUV HH

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    Any changes on this in the last 16 months?
     
  12. msr709

    msr709 DIS Veteran

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    We are traveling in July 2015 and I'll be in need of a sun shade for the scooter for medical reasons. So does how does this affect getting on the buses? We have to use the Disney transportation, not renting a car. I've used the scooters before but never with a sunshade, but my new medication makes me have a terrible reaction to the sun. Any suggestions or comments that would be helpful would be appreciated. :thumbsup2
     
  13. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    Have you used the buses before?
    Used the buses before with an ECV?
    I'm not sure if you have general questions about using the buses with an ECV, using the buses in general or using them with a sunshade.

    The people I have seen with sunshades remove them to actually get on the bus. The sunshades do cause some blind spots and since you have to manouver around, it's just easier with it off.

    Also, important to be aware that the sunshades don't give 100% coverage from the sun. When the sun is directly above, you will have pretty good protection. But, at other times, you will have varying protection.
    So, you should discuss with your doctor whether sunblock or high SPF sunscreen will help.
    There is also clothing with sun protection built in. These are a few of the popular brands, but you can actually find sun protection clothing in most Sporting Goods stores now.

    http://www.coolibar.com/home.jsp
    http://www.sunprecautions.com
    http://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=47958
    http://www.solartex.com

    And, a general article about sun protective clothing
    http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/sun-protection/clothing
     
  14. msr709

    msr709 DIS Veteran

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    This reply has been VERY helpful. I did not know about the sun-protection clothing. Never had this condition before so I never looked it up.
    So thank you for your reply and the info on the clothing. I'm looking into that right now. :thumbsup2
     
  15. mrsmarilyn

    mrsmarilyn Mouse Junkie

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    The sun protection clothing is quite good. My husband is at risk for skin cancer, so he uses it when we go very sunny places.
     

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