OT-anyone have a hybrid?

Discussion in 'Budget Board' started by minnie1928, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. minnie1928

    minnie1928 WDW addict

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    I'm seriously considering the 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid and was wondering if anyone has had experience with hybrids (not necessarily this model)? What are the pros? What are the cons?
     
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  3. taraprather

    taraprather DIS Veteran

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    My husband works for toyota and he said the only thing he don't like about it is the trunk space..there is none. He said he would recommend the prius hybrid, as it is cheaper and has trunk space, and gets more gas miles then the camry hybrid (60 miles on the highway). I hope this helps. If you have any more questions, let me know.
     
  4. JoiseyMom

    JoiseyMom <font color=orange>Have you had your SPANX today??

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    My DH bought the 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid a month ago, and he loves it. It is very roomy inside, he is tall, and the prius would be too small for him. The inside of the rest of the car is roomy. I like that I have my own ac/heat control!! The trunk is small, because that is where the batteries are. It is expecially small to us, because our previous car had a HUGH trunk. But it is good enough for what we need. He is currently getting 41 mph, and is a very happy camper.
     
  5. Jeanne B

    Jeanne B DIS Veteran

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    My parents have had a Honda Civic hybrid for almost two years now and they love it...they often get 60-65 mpg.
     
  6. dizzy duck

    dizzy duck Mouseketeer

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    We bought a Prius last November and we are soooo in love with that car. It is roomy inside, has loads of trunk space, six airbags and we average about 50 mpg. It is the only one of our vehicles that our 18 y/o tree hugging son will be seen in!

    It is a little different to drive, but you get used to it. And we love being able to see the milage readout as we drive. It really makes you thing about the way you drive. No more taking off like a rocket if I can help it!

    :moped:
     
  7. debbi801

    debbi801 DIS Veteran

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    We have 2 hybrids. We have a 2004 Prius (new style) and a 2006 Ford Escape Hybrid. We have 3 kids--13, 11, and 4. The 5 of us are tight in the Prius but can do it. We have plenty of room in the escape. Both cars are great with trunk space, especially the escape which also has a roof rack. We were able to get a week's worth of luggage, 2 lap tops, and a stroller in the back of the Escape for our last Disney trip.

    The MPG is amazing. We get some where around 50 MPG on the Prius and about 32 MPG on the Escape. I've only had the escape since May. I had a mini-van but was tired of gettting 20 MPG when gas was costing as much as it is.

    You need to keep in mind that if you're thinking the money you save on gas will off set what you pay for the car, you're in for a long wait. Hybrids do cost more than a regular car. But, you're helping the environment and conserving fuel which is not a replenishing resource.

    One funky thing with the Escape is that the A/C has 2 settings. The regular setting causes the A/C to stop running when the car is in electric mode. During heat waves like we've been having, that can get really bad. In the AC Max mode, the A/C runs all the time, but the car is never in electric mode so your MPG goes down a bit. Both cars take some getting used to as far as braking goes--you're recharging the batteries when you brake and you can "feel" a difference. With both cars, the MPG improves as you get used to the car and also as the engine breaks in.

    We would absolutely buy them again. If there are any specific questions I can answer, let me know. :wave2:
     
  8. dawnball

    dawnball <font color=red>bouncie bouncie...<br><font color=

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    Pros: Good gas mileage. good short term resale value (say 2-3 years). The battery packs are holding up better than expected (which is good, since they're remarkably expensive)

    Cons: to realize the best gas mileage, you have to be willing to change your driving habits. Driving fast (over 65) and your gas mileage will drop. Hybrids tend to come with a lot of dodads and geegaws "standard", which increases maintenance costs. Hybrids have their own "special" maintenance costs - those nifty LCD screens that show your gas mileage have a finite life and are currently around $1000 to fix for example. The resale market on hybrids is likely to drop if foreign manufacturers bring small, efficient non-hybrid vehicles to market. Cargo space suffers.
     
  9. RoyalCanadian

    RoyalCanadian A Proud DVC Member @ SSR

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    Dawnball has highlighted some very important issues to consider when buying a hybrid. These cars are not all they are hyped up to be. Let's not forget that the battery used in a hybrid is a toxic waste dump all to itself with no infrastructure for recycling at its end of life.
     
  10. karinbelle

    karinbelle DIS Veteran

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    Has anyone checked out the VW diesels? I thought I saw on Edmund's that the Beetle, Jetta, and one other got about 50 mpg highway.
     
  11. Tumblwd501

    Tumblwd501 There is no charge for awesomeness.

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    The NiMH batteries which are used in hybrids are just as toxic, if not a little less, then the regular lead acid batteries regular cars use. And because nickel costs more then lead, NiMH batteries are currently recycled/reclaimed at a higher percentage than the lead acid batteries because lead is so cheap.

    I'd say the biggest con for the NiMH batteries is that they cost approximately $7,000 to replace. But they're designed to last about 8-10 years, ie the life of the car.
     
  12. camlace

    camlace DIS Veteran

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    How much city vs highway driving do those with hybrids do? From what I understand if you have mostly highway miles you do not see the higher mpg (better than average but not as high as those with lots of city miles). Is this correct? I drive 100 miles (minimum) each day, 86 of those are highway miles. So as much as I would like a hybrid, from what I understand it might not be worth it based on my driving habits.

    TIA!
    Cindy
     
  13. debbi801

    debbi801 DIS Veteran

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    Actually both Toyota and Ford recyle the battery packs. And they come with a 100K (ford) - 150K (Toyota) warranty on the batteries.
     
  14. Deb & Bill

    Deb & Bill DVC-Trivia Contest, Apr-2006: Honorable Mention

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    You need to do more city driving than highway driving to come out ahead with a hybrid. We looked at the Highlander Hybrid for about 10 minutes and found the extra cost would not be offset by the savings for city driving.
     
  15. Chicago526

    Chicago526 <font color=red>Any dream will do...<br><font colo

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    Wouldn't it depend on the type of highway driving you do? If your highway commute is mostly stop and go bumper-to-bumper traffic, I think that counts as city driving, doesn't it?
     
  16. tiggerluver12

    tiggerluver12 Mouseketeer

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    We own a 2003 Honda Civic Hybrid which my husband drives to and from work, which is about 50 miles round trip - mostly highway, but going into the city. He averages about 50 miles per gallon. The back seats are relatively spacious for a small sedan and the trunk space is more than adequate ---- not small!!!! It can hold both our son's baseball equipment bag and our daughter's softball equipment back with ease - along with other items. The only thing my husband worries about is the life of the battery - which we don't know what that is yet.
     
  17. clutter

    clutter <font color=FF66FF>Princess's Mom<br><font color=b

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    I had a 2004 Prius. When I go on a long highway trip, I get 51mpg, with air conditioning, driving pretty well over 65. :blush: My normal driving is the worst kind, it's more like suburban driving. My stops and gos are on hills, etc. I drive the highway to work in the city, but few lights although a good amount of bumper to bumper. In the winter, I get around 48/49mpg, in the summer it drops to 46 or so. Now I have a 2006 Prius, but it's so new I don't have a good feel for the mileage!

    And yes, with the warranties, the battery isn't much of a concern.
     
  18. ducklite

    ducklite <font color=teal>Take the Poly, it's fabulous!<br>

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    We've got a 2005 Prius. My 6' husband doesn't even have the seat all the way back and has plenty of room. I can't imagine anyone under 6'6" having a problem with it.

    My 6' son fits in the backseat with leg room to spare. And there is a TON of cargo space.

    He does a combination of city and highway driving and averages about 50 mpg.

    You can get a Prius in a stripped down version, although the wait list for them is longer. We wanted a loaded model as DH does a lot of long distance driving (r/t FL to NJ every month) so creature comforts were really important. He feels very comfortable in that car on those long drives, the seats are great.

    Based on DH's driving habits (25K-30K miles a year) with gas at $2.75 a gallon on average he saved $800 on gas last year over the car he was driving previously.

    We have had zero problems with the Prius, one "recall" item was quickly and efficiently fixed during an oil change.

    Anne
     
  19. minnie1928

    minnie1928 WDW addict

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    My DH is considering the Escape Hybrid. We both currently have AWD vehicles and he insists on having atleast 1 AWD. He drives 90 miles each day for work (all highway), so we really have to look at it to see if it's worthwhile. I on the other hand drive mostly city driving and currently get about 17 mpg, so the 38-40mpg camry sounds pretty good.

    As far as saving money, I realize that isn't necessarily going to happen. But after seeing "An Inconvenient Truth" last week at the movies, it's really started me thinking on what can I do to help the environment. I currently own my car and the equity I have in the car should pay for 90% of the Camry (after tax credits). So financially speaking, it's not much outlay for mega gas savings and dramatically lower emissions.

    I'm going to test drive the camry tomorrow, so we'll se how it goes! Thanks for all the input!
     
  20. dawnball

    dawnball <font color=red>bouncie bouncie...<br><font color=

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    Well, in terms of the environment - the best things you can do are to drive less and to not buy new cars. Creating a new car generates around 30 tons of waste. More importantly - the production of a new car generates almost 50% as much air pollution as driving it for 10 years (130,000 miles) does. Factor in disposing of the car and you're close to 60% as much air pollution.

    Unless you expect to cut your pollution by three-quarters, a new car to save the environment probably doesn't make sense. If you're going to buy a new car anyway - sure, buy the most fuel efficient car you can. But don't buy a more fuel efficient car over keeping your existing car.
     
  21. magic kingdom park

    magic kingdom park Mouseketeer

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    [QUOTE=minnie1928]I'm seriously considering the 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid and was wondering if anyone has had experience with hybrids (not necessarily this model)? What are the pros? What are the cons?[/QUOTE]


    A friend of mine bought a camry hybrid in June she drove it about 3 weeks and check the fuel milage which is suppose to be 41 in town, she was only getting 25. The dealership did not want to help her at all with this, she finally went to the main Toyota office and they refunded her purchase, and she purchased a regular camry.
     

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