No good deed goes unpunished!

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by IheartMickey, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. gemini2727

    gemini2727 Mouseketeer

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    "And the odds you'll become ill or die due to a scratch are roughly the same as winning the lottery."

    And once in a while, someone wins the lottery, don't they?

    Not to belabor the point, but rabies is nothing to play with. I agree that the OP will very likely not contract rabies from her scratches, but what a chance to take! The NYS Board of Health was clear to us that my daughter needed the vaccine after her feral cat scratch...

    A Disney online community may not be the best place for advice on proper animal rescue, but it is also not a great place to get medical advice on something so serious, which is why I would recommend calling her doctor.
     
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  3. manning

    manning <font color=blue>Just for that I have requested it

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    You a nurse? What's your advise about possible exposure of rabies doctor?
     
  4. hellow

    hellow Mouseketeer

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    While I don't want to belittle the OP for her kind efforts (I can understand how a feral kitten could seem a little less difficult to catch and cage), I did get a shock when I read that someone in Oregon got the Plague from being bitten by a cat. The owner was trying to retrieve a mouse from the cat's mouth and got bitten in the process. I know the man was in the hospital for many weeks, had some amputations, and for a while they didn't think he would live.

    It is truly amazing how a seemingly harmless animal can wreak such havoc on people.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/oregon-man-survives-black-plague-lose-fingers-toes/story?id=16806758
     
  5. coopersmom

    coopersmom DIS Veteran

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    You are correct that a Disney forum is NOT the place to go for medical advice, and I would never dream of advising AGAINST seeing a doctor. I was just trying to inject some common sense and preclude any fear, because the reality is that getting rabies from a cat scratch is virtually impossible, in real-world medical terms, even if you were scratched by a cat that turned out to be rabid, which even a feral kitten is EXTREMELY unlikely to be.

    There are less than 300 cases of rabies PER YEAR amongst cats in the entire United States, according to the CDC. And that's out of roughly 90 million cats. (Dog rabies is even rarer, at well less than 100 cases per year.)

    And other illnesses, like cat scratch fever, while possible, are rarely serious. The vast majority of cases of cat scratch fever, which may sound like a scary disease, don't even require medical care (see: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002581/).

    The thing you should be concerned about, if anything, is infection, and, obviously, if the scratch shows any signs of pus, severe or worsening redness or swelling, or becomes hot to the touch, then you should be worried and seek medical attention. Otherwise, keeping the wound clean and dry is a very reasonable course of action.
     
  6. gemini2727

    gemini2727 Mouseketeer

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    To each his own. I have never regretted getting the vaccine for my daughter. I could not have lived with the worry, since we are talking about a fatal disease, no matter how small the risk. That being said, I'm done, best of luck to OP:)
     
  7. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

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    I went out on the porch tonight to try and get some pictures of the one I picked up but he wasn't cooperating. He disappeared once my flash went on. These are the healthy looking bigger cats in the colony. And no I didn't touch or feed them. I just talked to them.

    http://youtu.be/CmnQZAW856o
     
  8. sunshinehighway

    sunshinehighway DIS Veteran

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    Did they talk back? Seriously you need to just leave them alone.
     
  9. Allison

    Allison DIS Veteran

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    Why do you need a picture? Let them be.
     
  10. sissy_ib

    sissy_ib DIS Veteran

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    OP, I know you moved recently. Are stray cats something that you had not encountered before? I think you are looking at them and seeing pets. They are not.
    You need to look at them as you would a raccoon or any other wild animal. These cats are wild and need to be left alone. As far as your scratch I hope nothing comes of it. Please don't put yourself in the position to be hurt by one of these animals again.
     
  11. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

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    No, I never encountered them in New York. You're right.. I am seeing a pet when I look at them.
     
  12. phorsenuf

    phorsenuf <marquee><font color=blue>Not so New Rule author o

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    I'm willing to bet that when my son contracted cat scratch fever and had to have a lymph node removed, he would have rather had won the lottery. ;)
     
  13. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

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    I've been sitting here thinking more about this. I came from a really populated built up area, the only thing I ever came across were lost dogs with collars. I'd go up to them, check if they were friendly and then call their owner. I've done that 3 times.

    I also volunteered for a animal rescue and they always gave me the intimidating dogs like dobermans or rottweilers because I have no fear of animals. I've always been like this though, I don't remember ever fearing any type of animal and when I see them I immediately put human feelings on them. I'm constantly trying to pet the ducks by our pond, and when I went to Ireland I pet a sheep and a giant swan that was laying in the grass. I yearn for some sort of connection. I guess I'm getting all psychological about it. I'll stop rambling now.
     
  14. IDoDis

    IDoDis Knows the password to get into the Moose Lodge

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    A friend of mine petted a stray cat and got scratched. She didn't think anything of it until a week later when she started going blind! Her vision started closing in on her and every day it got worse and worse until she could barely see. The docs didn't know what she had and did testing for things like MS on her which all came back negative. Then she remembered about the cat scratching her and called the doctor back. After more tests, she found out she had Cat Scratch Fever. After over a month, she started to slowly get her vision back. It was due to some kind of swelling which in turn blocked her vision.
     
  15. RadioNate

    RadioNate DIS Veteran

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    These are not pets. They are stray feral cats. Huge difference.

    And "petting" the ducks in the pond? In Florida?

    I lived in FL. Sooner or later there will be a gator in that pond. Gators like stray cats too.

    None of these animals are pets.
     
  16. ilovepcot

    ilovepcot <font color=purple>Caused the first ever Tag Fairy

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    I understand not wanting to see animals go hungry. Unfortunately, putting food out will eventually attract animals you don't want close to your residence. Some really do have potential to harm you or small children playing outside.
     
  17. mdsoccermom

    mdsoccermom DIS Veteran

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    One day this fearless attitude of yours is going to get you into a world of trouble. Just leave the animals alone. They are neither your pets or your friends.
     
  18. NHdisneylover

    NHdisneylover DIS Veteran

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    OP--I am sorry but this is about YOU, not the animals. You are tricking yourself into thinking you are helping so you can feel good about yourself. They are NOT people or human-like in any way; they are not even pets. Insisting on treating them as such puts both you and them as well as your own pets and your neighbors in danger.

    Truly, if you stop and really think about what you are doing and what these wild animals are at the end of the day what you are doing are not "good deeds" at all--they are careless, selfish acts meant to make you feel good about "helping" while in fact causing a lot more problems all the way around.

    I really, really hope you can step back and look at things objectively and stop this type of behavior (petting wild ducks, feeding feral cats, etc) now.
     
  19. joyjanet

    joyjanet Melbourne FL

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    So true. She does not follow advice and I think she is bored and wants to see how many threads she can start so she has something to read. Hopefully her job at Disney will keep her busy and away from strays and tenants. But, just to stay on topic, I will tell her that my mom got cat scratch fever from a pet cat that I had and she should have it looked at. We did not have insurance growing up but that is why they have health care for people who can not afford it.
     
  20. Maggie Lizer

    Maggie Lizer DIS Veteran

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    I would never feed a stray cat, or try to pick one up or "convert" it to a house cat. I'd be on the phone with animal control. They are invasive pests.

    Not like the OP will do what is right, anyway.
     
  21. Lynne M

    Lynne M Moderator Moderator

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    This is a really good, really kind thing to do. :)

    But see, they're not people, or pets. They're wonderful, amazing creatures in their own right, and they deserve to live their lives the way they're intended to, and the way they want to. Healthy wild animals don't need or want human interference in their lives. It's not helping them, it's disrupting behavior that's evolved over thousands of years to be right for them.

    The ducks don't want you to touch them. They're probably terrified of you, and continued attempts to pet them are just going to make them more frightened. I'm sure you don't want that.

    I love animals, too, and I've made wonderful connections with my own pets and my friends' pets over the years. But wild animals, I enjoy from afar. Because it's better for them that way. I get great joy out of watching the many deer, turkeys, foxes, and ducks that hang out on my parents' property, I've learned so much about their behavior and it's fascinating. But I would never dream of touching any of them. It might be fun for me, but it would be bad for them. And in fact, the reason all those deer, etc, feel comfortable enough to hang around is that my parents have never bothered them in any way. They trust my parents to leave them alone. The deer will leave their babies in the tall grass a couple of yards from Mom & Dad's front door, and you can bet they wouldn't be doing that if Mom or Dad had ever gone near any of the fawns.

    By the way, you mentioned that you can't stand for the feral cats to go hungry. What makes you think they're starving? Cats are amazing natural hunters. There are loads of farm cats around where my parents live, and they get along very well hunting their own food.

    Your heart is in the right place, and if you want to help animals, there are SO many ways for you to do it. A hour of googling would get you a long list of rescue organizations, no-kill shelters, wildlife rehabilitation centers....all kinds of places that desperately need volunteer help from dedicated animal lovers.
     

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