No good deed goes unpunished!

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by IheartMickey, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. TwoCortWort

    TwoCortWort A Buckeye Disney Princess

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    538
    I always heard its more important to seek medical care when a cat bites you and breaks the skin. I have been scratched by my own cats and strays my whole life and never had problems.
     
  2. Avatar

    Google AdSense Guest Advertisement


    to hide this advert.
  3. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Messages:
    1,067
    They told me they wouldn't come, it was up to me to capture.
     
  4. shortbun

    shortbun <font color=green>Peacenik<br><font color=purple><

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 1999
    Messages:
    18,322
    Did you know that rabies vaccines can only safely be given once? If you are bitten or attacked a second time; the vaccine can be fatal. A client of mine died from it. I would never just assume a wild/feral animal had rabies. The OP was warned about feral cats; they freak out when you try to 'rescue' them. These are kittens; doubtful they've had a run in with an infected animal; they'd no doubt have been killed in the altercation.
     
  5. Luv Bunnies

    Luv Bunnies DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Messages:
    5,991
    My grandma once had about 10 stray cats hanging around her house. My mom contacted the local shelter and they told her to come and pick up a humane trap. She was able to trap all of the cats over about a week. Each time she trapped one, she took it directly to the shelter. She never had to touch the cats because the shelter personnel would take them out and give my mom back the empty trap. All of the cats were young and my mom was told they had a good chance of being socialized and adopted out.

    Perhaps your shelter could lend you a trap so you can safely catch the cats without having to touch them yourself?
     
  6. npmommie

    npmommie <font color=red>Channels George Michael in her car

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,378
    You dont have an animal shelter in your town? Animal control will come get them and take them to the shelter. Where is the mama cat?
     
  7. mlynn

    mlynn DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    963
  8. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Messages:
    1,067
    Animal Control will kill them if they don't get adopted in time.
     
  9. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Messages:
    1,067
    The kitten was sick when they brought it in. Ive been observing this cat for weeks. Both my dog and cat are current on their rabies vaccine.
     
  10. sunshinehighway

    sunshinehighway DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Messages:
    4,634
    It might sound mean but sometimes that is the best they can do for them. These cats can be in such poor health or so wild they are not adoptable.
     
  11. happygirl

    happygirl DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2004
    Messages:
    18,194
    I think the OP is an adult, and doesn't need to be told what to do. Have to love the Dis
     
  12. phorsenuf

    phorsenuf <marquee><font color=blue>Not so New Rule author o

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2003
    Messages:
    18,776
    Ya know what...sometimes they do.
     
  13. mlynn

    mlynn DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    963
    better safe then sorry later!
     
  14. gemini2727

    gemini2727 Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    380
    I would rather assume a feral animal HAD
    rabies than to assume it did not, since rabies IS fatal. Though the odds are against it, that is quite a chance to take. Also, I have done much research on the vaccine since we had to use it, and no where does it say a booster can be fatal. Where are you getting this?

    OP, since you have reguarly observed this particular cat, you hopefully can watch it, from afar, for ten days to be sure it still looks healthy at least. The cat that scratched my daughter ran away never to be seen again.

    Please warn your neighbors of these dangers...I'm concerned that you said children are picking up/ playing with feral animals...not a good idea! Best to you:)
     
  15. Zandy595

    Zandy595 DIS Veteran<br><font color=green>The other day I f

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2000
    Messages:
    10,831
    I know you probably don't want or need more "helpful advice", but here goes anyway...

    Don't use hand sanitizer (ow) or peroxide on your scratches. Wash with regular soap and water and make sure you put antibiotic oinment on them. Peroxide can actually make a minor cut worse and take longer to heal because the chemical reaction "eats" away at the tissue.
     
  16. npmommie

    npmommie <font color=red>Channels George Michael in her car

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,378
    If you love animals you will call and have them picked up, you are doing them NO favor by not calling.
     
  17. IheartMickey

    IheartMickey I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Messages:
    1,067
    Thank you. I did use peroxide again this morning but then I put on antibiotic ointment and some band aids. I'll do it again tonight, but skip the harsh stuff. Just Dial soap and antibiotic ointment. Thanks again for the advice.
     
  18. disney1990

    disney1990 <font color=royalblue>Wow, it make my heart skip a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 1999
    Messages:
    10,234
    Anytime an animal is found to have rabies, everybody that has handled the animal receives shots. And animals in contact with a rabid animal are revaccinated. When my sister's cat got into a fight with an unknown animal, he had to be revaccinated. I hope you are alright, but I would see a doctor, period.

    http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-rabies.pdf
     
  19. StanH

    StanH Are my ears growing yet?

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    388
    You catch them with traps, not hands.

    Feral cats are a menace and you should not be feeding them.
     
  20. monsterkitty

    monsterkitty DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,271
    Last Christmas our college-age niece was staying at our house until she flew home for break. She wanted to pet our cat but he was having none of that. I picked him up to get him away from her and he bit and scratched me. He had bitten me before while playing and I have had plenty of scratches from cats in my life so I thought nothing of it as I cleaned the wound and put neosporn on my hand.

    The next morning my hand was red and swollen. I went to the after-hours care as it was a Saturday. I was told that any cat bite should be seen in the ER within a few hours because they can become infected within 3 hours. They opened the bites and drained them and put me on an antibiotic and gave me instructions to go to the ER immediately if it got worse.

    Next day I woke up and had streaks running up my arm so it was off to the ER. It was the scratches, not the bite, that were infected the most. I was on IV antibiotics for 24 hours and before the released me they put a splint on my hand to keep it immobilized. Since I had a broken foot at the time I walked out the cast on my foot and a splint on my hand. :rotfl2:

    Moral of the story: Cat bites and scratches, even from your own indoor-only cats can be dangerous. Do not mess around with them!
     
  21. coopersmom

    coopersmom DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Messages:
    835
    Handling feral cats is a very tricky business, but they are a "menace," as someone else dubbed them, created only because humans treat their pets as disposable and "let them go free," when they get tired of taking care of them ... Which really equates to leaving in them the wild to starve or otherwise die violently. Your instinct to help is admirable, and totally possible, but you must go about it the right way.

    And the odds you'll become ill or die due to a scratch are roughly the same as winning the lottery.

    The best, and most humane, way to cull a colony of TRULY feral cats is trap-neuter-return. You trap only the males (females are released immediately, without handling), have them neutered and then release them back WHERE YOU FOUND THEM, again, without undue handling. You take them in the morning, or the night before, and they're ready to be released that evening, with zero recovery time. Many rescues and clinics will do it for as little as $10-$20/cat. The colony will then die out very quickly. You can get rid of a 50-cat colony in less than six months, simply by neutering the males. The life expectancy of these cats is extremely short.

    Trapping these cats and taking them to animal control will ultimately just lead to them being immediately put down, as no organization will even attempt to re-home a feral cat, when there are millions of non-feral cats needing homes.

    The idea of whether or not to provide them with a food source is a mixed one. Some rescue groups strictly advise against it, while others say it doesn't really matter. The studies I've seen say that colonies with a human-provided food source that have been part of trap-neuter-return programs, survive only marginally longer than those left on their own, so providing food for them isn't the largest issue. The danger would be eliminating one colony only to trade it out for another, if another group finds the food source, but cats are territorial and while one or two will join a group, colonies tend to remain distinct (like wild cat prides).

    For real information, check out reputable local rescues or start with this ASPCA FAQ on feral cats: http://www.aspca.org/adoption/feral-cats-faq.aspx, or this step-by-step guide to helping feral cats from the respected Alley Cat Allies: http://www.alleycat.org/document.doc?id=461.

    There is a lot of really, really good information online about how to help. A vacation planning Disney community isn't really the first place I'd look for it, though.

    Best of luck, sincerely.
     

Share This Page