Medicine in carry on

Discussion in 'Transportation' started by babygirlamg, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. babygirlamg

    babygirlamg DIS Veteran

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    Can I bring Benadryl, Advil, and anti acid all pill forms in my carry on
     
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  3. Shagley

    Shagley If you don't move when I say "beep beep", I will r

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  4. OKW Lover

    OKW Lover Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle. DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    Medications should always be in your carryon.
     
  5. ParrotBill

    ParrotBill Yo ho, yo ho, a parrot's life for me

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    The TSA web site has instructions on medicines. All medicines including liquids are allowed. Keep any liquid medicines separate and present them at the checkpoint for separate inspection. I have had no problem with prescriptions and with brand new liquid medicines with unbroken seals. I threw out the open non-prescriptions medicines for my return trip to avoid any disagreement on the regulations.. but here for your reference (see last paragraph):

    http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/3-1-1-carry-ons
     
  6. mrsboz

    mrsboz DIS Veteran

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    Am I braindead or are you only allowed ONE quart size plastic bag filled with your medecine?
     
  7. OKW Lover

    OKW Lover Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle. DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    Medicine isn't restricted to fitting into a certain size bag
     
  8. jadephoenixx

    jadephoenixx Earning My Ears

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    To be on the safe side (i.e. so you're not questioned when you're going through Security), you should always carry medication in it's original container and with the prescription label, if it's a prescription med.
     
  9. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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    Not necessary for US travel. The TSA isn't interested in your meds.
     
  10. OrangeCountyCommuter

    OrangeCountyCommuter DIS Veteran

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    If it's a liquid it needs to be in a labeled containter. Otherwise the "theatre" might not take your word that's a medicine.

    (Of course it would never occur to a terrorist to pour out the benadryl would it? Thousands Standing Around acting like "security" LOL )
     
  11. maxiesmom

    maxiesmom The Mean Squinty Eye Works

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    Nah, I never do that, and I have never been questioned. I divide up my meds so that I have some in my carry-on and some in my checked bags. Just in case I lose my purse, or in case my checked bag gets a little lost. You don't need to have them in the original bottles.
     
  12. jadephoenixx

    jadephoenixx Earning My Ears

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    Ah...that makes sense for domestic flights! Being a Canadian flying into the U.S, I'm so used to going through Customs so I'm always making sure I have original bottles for any meds...last thing I want is Customs thinking I'm trying to smuggle illegal drugs! That would be a quick way to ruin a vacation!
     
  13. rwdavis2

    rwdavis2 DIS Veteran

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    That is not necessary. I never take original containers. They really don't care about pills.
     
  14. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    You really don't need to carry the original pill bottles crossing into the US -- Japan, perhaps, but not here.

    To be safe, and in case you need to replace a med here for any reason, carry paper copies of the bottle labels (your pharmacist can create a printout of those for you), but you can leave the bottles themselves at home.

    I do this routinely when traveling internationally in North America and Europe, and it is just fine.
     

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