Is it possible to get out of getting my dtr the flu shot?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by renae3, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    It takes about two weeks for the flu vaccination to take effect; and tge virus constantly mutates, so one year's vaccination (made from that year's virus) won't be effective in another year.
     
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  3. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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    Several of my coworkers are in the medical field--allied health programs. They have been told that this years flu shot is spot on for the strain going around. The problem this year has been folks either not getting the shot or getting it to late.
     
  4. cornflake

    cornflake DIS Veteran

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    What?
     
  5. Christopher Robin

    Christopher Robin DIS Veteran

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    OP, did you get your DIS answer?
    :upsidedow
     
  6. luvmy3

    luvmy3 <font color=green>When I drink I find its easier t

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    There is no vaccine out there that can guarantee 100% protection.
    Also, the flu vaccine changes every year based on what strains are most likely going to be the most prevalent. Getting the vaccine one year does not give you immunity the next year or to every strain out there.
     
  7. kidshop

    kidshop DIS Veteran

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    It's not that the flu vaccine is particularly toxic. It's that I do not believe it it necessary. I just don't take medicine I don't need. It you need it, take it and it's worth it. If my kids had medical issues where the flu would cause a more serious threat, I would get them the shot. Otherwise I do not want stuff injected into them. I'd rather take chances with the flu than the vaccine.

    It's not about being anti-vac. It's about deciding for yourself about risks/benefits to pharmaceuticals. I'm just not of the mindset that if 'they' want me to take something than I must not question and it must be best.


    I just got the adult tdap shot b/c that one I think is worth it.
     
  8. ez

    ez <font color=green>Yoshi Lover<br><font color=deepp

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    It seems to me that this years flu shot must be a good match. My son and I got the flu and my husband and older son who got the shot didnt, and they made no effort to avoid us at all, they were sitting in bed with us many times as we hacked away on them. And now my mom has the flu and my dad who got the shot hasnt caught it from her. My mom has been really really sick btw, it seems quite true what they say about if affecting older people much worse :( She is in her 70's and now shes on an inhaler and all kinda of meds now because of it.
     
  9. sam_gordon

    sam_gordon DIS Veteran

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    I heard somewhere the flu shot's effect only lasted 2-3 months. So if you got the shot in October (for example), by February, it won't protect you. Has anyone else heard that?
     
  10. Mouse House Mama

    Mouse House Mama <font color=red>Luckiest Mommy in the World!!!<br>

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    I get what you are saying and in most cases agree with you. However, why does someone get to say "I believe in xyz so I don't have to do that" and the others who might have different "religious" beliefs don't get that choice is their personal beliefs are in conflict? Religious beliefs are personal beliefs no matter how we twist it.
     
  11. Janepod

    Janepod <font color=royalblue>The new dinning plan is out.

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    That seems to be false. From http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_inf.asp

    How long does immunity from influenza vaccine last?

    Protection from influenza vaccine is thought to persist for a year because of waning antibody and because of changes in the circulating influenza virus from year to year.
     
  12. Robbi

    Robbi DIS Veteran

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    I've read 6 months efficacy range.
    Children need 2 vaccines because 1 vaccination is only 66% effective.
    It takes 2 weeks for the vaccine to become effective.
    The vaccine provides protection for 3 strains although there are countless strains because the virus mutates.
     
  13. sam_gordon

    sam_gordon DIS Veteran

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    Thanks!:thumbsup2
     
  14. Christine

    Christine <font color=red>Would love to be able to sit on th

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    Yes, I've heard that too. In fact, I remember one year, when the flu season lasted particularly long, they were urging folks to come in for boosters who had gotten the shot in September/October. That's why I was sort of surprised when I saw it being pushed hard in August.
     
  15. jahber

    jahber DIS Veteran

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    I'm not sure what you're arguing against here. I didn't say I only approve of vaccines that guarantee 100% effectiveness. Nor did I imply that the flu vaccine should provide immunity for more than one flu season. I said I personally approve of vaccines that *work*, in other words, that fulfill their purpose of eliminating or vastly reducing a disease among the vaccinated population. At least, that's what I was taught in my medical sciences classes. Perhaps others have a different understanding of what an effective vaccine does. Incidences of small pox, measles, rubella, etc, have been drastically reduced or officially eradicated (small pox) by vaccines. While the flu vaccine CAN be effective when it is well matched to the strain you actually contract, it has not happened for my family. And in fact, according to independent sources--including those already mentioned previously--the vaccines have not been nearly as effective as we've been led to believe. I hope that helps clear up any confusion about the point I was trying to make.
     
  16. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    This year's flu vaccine appears to be extremely effective against this year's flu mutation (see DISers own reports in this thread, as well as official reports).

    Because the virus mutates as it travels from one victim to the next, one vaccine can't be effective. The vaccine has to be adapted to fight the specific mutation.
     
  17. jahber

    jahber DIS Veteran

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    Ok. Yes, the flu vaccine needs to change every year, perhaps even more often. I certainly understand that and I wasn't arguing that. However, the new report I read about flu efficacy from the University of Minnesota specifically says, "there is no evidence to support the idea that flu vaccine is more effective in years when the strains included in the shot are a good match for those circulating in nature." The point of the study is that, historically, the flu vaccine is just not as effective as we've been led to believe, even when the strains are well matched.

    So, we choose not to use the vaccine. If one day the CDC can prove that the flu vaccine will eradicate or vastly reduce the incidence of the flu, we will reconsider the vaccine. That's all I'm saying. I'm not trying to be a radical anti-vaccine activist. I'm trying to explain my much-deliberated decision to not to use a vaccine that can't be proven to be effective. But perhaps I'm just not being clear, so I apologize.
     
  18. DebbieB

    DebbieB DIS Veteran

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    I've always felt I'd rather be protected from some of the strains rather than none. I don't understand not getting it because it's not 100%. Even if it protects against 50%, it's better than none. I've gotten it the past 5 or 6 years because I traveled frequently and never got the flu. Who knows if I was exposed or not, you never really know. You only know if it didn't work.
     
  19. disney1990

    disney1990 <font color=royalblue>Wow, it make my heart skip a

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    I spent one year in bed for 10 days with the flu - NEVER AGAIN. Perhaps some will change their minds when the get "the flu". Not some virus that is going around.
     
  20. mfd25wife

    mfd25wife DIS Veteran

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    I didn't. I definitely had the flu. And when I had H1N1, they made me wear the surgical mask. I got pneumonia from H1N1 so it just kept dragging out and I got even more meds. I didn't think I was ever going to feel right. As the saying goes, I wasn't sure if I was dying or just wanted to. I still don't have my DD get vaccinated.
     
  21. luvmy3

    luvmy3 <font color=green>When I drink I find its easier t

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    Actually I am confused by your post. Perhaps I read it wrong, but the bolded sounds as if you had expected to be protected from the flu the following year :confused3
     

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