Is it just me??

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by ilovedisney1982, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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    That sounds like a good measurement. Short enough to not get in the way of their jumps and stunts but long enough to cover the necessary parts.

    We have ongoing debates about costumes in Show Choir too. Sometimes I think directors from the different schools are going to come to blows over it :rotfl:
     
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  3. dizcrazee

    dizcrazee DIS Veteran

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    I see - thanks for the clarification. It sounds like whoever is in charge of the high school cheerleaders needs to take a cue from your group.

    I really feel that it is inappropriate for teenage girls to dance around like that in tiny outfits in front of a bunch of men and boys. This is a private school, and I honestly don't know how they are getting away with it. My daughter says it's even worse at the pep rallies, to the point that she finds it embarrassing. We're not uptight prudes or anything, but these quasi-stripper routines are just beyond the pale. :(
     
  4. Granny square

    Granny square Always planning a trip!

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    Blame the Jon benet murder. Watching that sweet girl be encouraged to act like a vamp was horrible.
     
  5. StitchesGr8Fan

    StitchesGr8Fan DIS Veteran

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    That is when I first remember pageants coming under fire.

    Before that we knew about them, but we just felt pity on those that did them.
     
  6. horseshowmom

    horseshowmom DIS Veteran

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    You know, I have to admit that this is how I feel about it as well. When my daughter was little, I occasionally had people approach me about putting her in pageants. I was always polite but told them that just wasn't my thing.

    I will acknowledge that when my daughter was 18 she decided to do the Fairest of the Fair competition, but even with that, she did it in a borrowed dress (no cost involved! :thumbsup2). She won, and we overheard one of the other contestants (rather loudly) complaining to anyone within earshot that it wasn't fair that (DD's name) won because she didn't even do anything special with her hair (worn long and simple - no poof or big hair involved, I'm afraid LOL). This girl did pageants from time to time, but she was definitely lacking any poise and grace. :rolleyes1



    Same experience here. My daughter got herself up at 6 in the mornings during the summers (and she is NOT a morning person) so she could work her horses before it got too hot for them. There were many nights that she was out in the hallway of the barn practicing showmanship when it was below freezing temperatures.

    I never ONCE told her to go work her horses in all those years. It was her passion and still is. She recently started back showing after taking a break for pharmacy school.

    I have to agree with this as well. I would feel the same way.


    OP, I do have one question to ask. I may have missed it, but I haven't seen anything about the girl's father (if there really is a girl which I tend to doubt ;) ) and how he feels about it?
     
  7. Metsfan520

    Metsfan520 DIS Veteran

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    Plus she bumped up an old thread (from 2011) about that TV show on these pageants.

    and if you're still looking OP, I don't care for these pageants at all.
     
  8. goofy4tink

    goofy4tink No tags...not needed! Transportation moderator Moderator

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    Here's my issue.....my now 37 y/o dd danced for 12 years. My now 19 y/o dd danced for 15 years...tap, ballet, jazz, hip hop, irish step, contemporary. She is also now a theatre major. She has done many, many shows. As have I. Believe me when I say that makeup is not needed at the level it is used for these pageants!!! Yes, you need more than usual makeup for the stage, but it's just a bit more then street makeup..unless you are going for some type of character. Other than that?? No heavy, over the top makeup, no fake teeth, no spray tans, no worries about being outside playing and being bruised!!
    I think most people would be hard pressed to match up the 'before' photo of a 7 y/o little girl (just the normal every day look of a little child out in her yard playing), to the photo of the 'pageant' girl. It amazes me to see the difference that pageant stuff makes. These girls are not being judged on anything 'normal'. They don't bear any resemblance to their normal selves.
    And to compare pageants to dance??? Really??? The most I ever spend, in all those years of dance, for a costume was about $120. Most ran much less. No special make up, no manicures, no fake teeth. To try to make a comparison between dance outfits and what those 'glitz' dresses cost??? Not even in the same ball park!!! Nowhere close.

    And the Miss America pageant? If you read up on the vast majority of those girls?? Most are either in college or headed there in the next year or so. I know that back when I was in college, I was our winter carnival queen one year. I got an invitation, for the state pageant committee (that leads up to the Miss America pageant) to participate in future pageants. BUT..my gpa had to be above a certain point. No dummies were allowed to participate. So, yeah, they kind of are accomplished, intelligent young women. Not anywhere near the same catagory as the 'glitz' kids.

    When I looked at those photos, of the girls in that link?? All I could think of were the old Madame Alexander dolls....nothing normal or life-like about them at all. Just little dolls.
     
  9. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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    I can only go by the amount of make up that was needed to be seen on stage when dd danced and now when she performs with show choir. Back then--any make up would be "heavy" as she was a bit young for make up. But it was a full face and the eyes were a color to go well with the costume and heavy. Now-- Concert choir is regular make up--a bit heavier with red lipstick (never have understood that requirement but whatever), show choir is well done, heavy make up including that same blasted red lipstick :rotfl: (dd HATES the stuff). This year they are using natural colors, smokey eye but in order for it to actually be seen it is heavily done on the eyes and if the blush isn't heavy enough, they look washed out and dead. Several schools get a professional to come in and do the make up before a competition.

    I realize the cost of dance costumes is no where near what those dresses. I was comparing the look of the costumes to some of the outfits they wear.

    The girls in those photo are heavily made up, no doubt about it. But they are beautiful. Most look professionally done. It definitely makes them look older.
     
  10. Colleen27

    Colleen27 DIS Veteran

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    Personally I don't see a single lesson pageants teach that can't be taught in more age-appropriate and less superficial ways. And getting a child involved in such a time and energy intensive activity before the child is able to express any interests or desires of her own puts that little girl in the position of having to defy a lifetime of expectations if she wants to stop doing pageants or would rather try some other activities.

    I want my girls to be appreciated for their talents, personality, and determination, not for their outward appearances. And I personally don't see any value in pushing kids into any activity (other than life-skill things like learning to swim) before they are old enough to express an interest. I want my kids to use extracurriculars to explore things that they think they'd like, not to satisfy my (or DH's) desires.
     
  11. badblackpug

    badblackpug <font color=blue>If you knew her you would be shoc

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    Since the OP trolled and poofed, I will digress a bit.

    This is interesting. My daughter is 15. When she was 9-10ish we had a family friend whose daughter was the same age and very into cheer. She had encouraged my daughter to try it. When we checked it out I was appalled. Tiny, skimpy costumes, very provocative dance moves, and girls running around in tiny leotard material crop tops and booty shorts. Not to mention the girls stood outside local businesses and "canned" for donations in those outfits! I couldn't believe it. We (okay me) decided it wasn't for her.

    I am glad to see things have changed.

    The difference I see between wearing make-up and hair for dance and cheer is that dance and cheer actually have skills that the children have to learn. Pageants you just stand there and look artificially good.

    I clicked the link a PP gave for images of glitz pageant contestants. I was left feeling vaguely ill. It was truly disturbing. It also seems that the majority of girls are blue-eyed and blonde-haired. (maybe artificially so) My girls would never make it.
     
  12. tar heel

    tar heel <font color=royalblue>Where will we get our news i

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    Beautiful? No. I think they look bizarre and a little creepy. Definitely not beautiful.
     
  13. Granny square

    Granny square Always planning a trip!

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    They look like creepy dolls.
     
  14. Granny square

    Granny square Always planning a trip!

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    I agree with all.

    Thinking about dance and cheer I can see the need to emphasize the face some because of the continual action involved. So makeup to a degree is appropriate. I have yet to see 5 year old dancers with the kind of fake that goes with those pageants. They objectify young girls equating them with sexy adults in similar outfits.
     
  15. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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    http://http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/553477_372501269477745_453861475_n.jpg

    Not sure this link will work but the child in this picture is beautiful. Does she look like a doll? Yes. Is it something I would have wanted dd to run around daily looking like at that age? No. Nor do I think these girls run around looking like this all the time. Somehow I would imagine most of these girls do have other things in their lives besides pageants.

    I am sure there are some bad things that come from pageants. We never tried them. I can't have a real opinion about them because dd never participated in one.

    I do agree that that the make up for dance and cheer or the costumes in dance are all a part of a bigger picture that includes a skill and a talent. Do doubt about that.

    I am not a defender of pageants. There are just a lot of gripes about something because of what is see on TV and yet we all know how fake most of these shows are.

    If the OP is for real and pageants is what she and her dd want to do--so be it. As long as she is raising her child to be a productive member of society that is a kind, loving and compassionate human being; who cares if she has been in pageants? And hey, if it builds the child's self esteem to do this--that is a good thing. And a lot better than having something that tears their self esteem down.
     
  16. cabanafrau

    cabanafrau DIS Veteran

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    Sorry, former dance mom here. Dance is a HUGE offender in the arena of objectifying very young girls in sexy outfits. You wake up pretty darn fast in the morning when you go down to the hotel lobby to grab a coffee while your daughter heads for her dance workshop to behold six and eight year olds striding through the lobby, unescorted, in bitty booty shorts, bejeweled bras, full-face stage make-up, including false eyelashes and nothing else -- on their way to dance a full eight-hour slate of classes, not perform.

    Kills me that an industry who's primary consumers are females and most instructors and studio owners are females, yet they generally train sexy style by default to the girls.

    The only edge dance can offer over pageants in my mind is it's a great physical activity, you can learn some definite skills, it can be tremendous fun and you'll probably end up with tremendous posture as a dancer.
     
  17. ilovedisney1982

    ilovedisney1982 Loving Disney Every Day!

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    So, I had a heart to heart with my daughter. She says she likes pageants, but doesn't LOVE them. I made her a promise to pull her out of pageants and just keep her in competitive cheer. I think I need to dig a little deeper. Thoughts??
     
  18. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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  19. ilovedisney1982

    ilovedisney1982 Loving Disney Every Day!

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    When the twins are born, I most likely are going to have DD take a break until I can get on my feet again.
     
  20. luvsJack

    luvsJack DIS Veteran

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    I would follow her lead. If she wants out of them, let her out. She may want to do more later and that's ok. She may never return to pageants and that's ok too

    Competitive cheer is a great sport.
     
  21. Granny square

    Granny square Always planning a trip!

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    Well you have much more knowledge than I do on this. I was making a guess, trying to follow a thought process in my head. No dancers in my life.

    Sad information though. :/ especially that women encourage these stereotypes in these young girls.
     

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