I should’a taken that left in Albuquerque (Updated 8/16/13 Pg13)

Discussion in 'DIS Dads' started by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
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    6,194
    I was hoping someone would be entertained by that one.


    Have you now?


    No ones sure why, but they’re more common down there then ants at a picnic.


    Whoa… déjà vu! :rotfl2:


    I know many of your weaknesses.
    (you tend to write about ‘em in TRs)


    The vinegar stuff can be an acquired taste.
    But it’s that second sentence that is the real truth.

    A lot of pit masters will talk up their sauce…
    but I say good Que don’t need no sauce.


    You may never have run across the good stuff then.
    Actually, you won’t find it in a restaurant… to the best of my knowledge, it only exists in Tamara’s kitchen (she even goes as far as to home-bake the shortbread… Mmmmmmmmmm).


    If for some whacky reason you’re ever down this way… the first plate of ribs (and extra puppies) is on me.



    I may need to get me some this weekend if possible…




    Oh lord, don’t be worrying about keeping up. Sometime I get so busy I can’t even keep up with it. Besides, I’ve lost more readers then I’ll ever gain. It’s probably not worth my time to even write this stuff, but it keeps me somewhat sane.

    I hope y’all are feeling better and I’m just sorry to hear that you were having troubles in the house at all. You take your time. I’ll be here one way or the other. I just say thanks for reading along at all.
     
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  3. afwdwfan

    afwdwfan DIS Dad #460

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    Stripper Clause... :rotfl2::lmao::rotfl::rotfl2::lmao::rotfl:

    Then why didn't you just say that to begin with? :confused3

    Your dad rocks! :thumbsup2

    You counted??? :confused3

    I'm getting hungry...

    I wonder if they'd sell them at a discount to toss in the fridge for lunch later in the week?

    I totally agree. Those sauces do nothing for me, but I'd suspect that once the meat is cooked, as long as I don't slather on extra sauce, it will be good.
     
  4. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
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    You’re welcome.
    Actually… that may well be the funniest part of that one. :lmao:


    Cause knowing that it’s the most direct route ain’t enough.
    Ya’ still have to know how to pull it off

    To this day… DW won’t drive it for fear of getting lost.
    She’s been up and down that list of roads with me (and her family before that) more times then we could possibly count but is convinced shell miss one of those turns somewhere and get herself hopelessly lost.


    Yes he does.
    Wouldn’t even dream of disputing that one.


    I’ve climbed them many times.

    Often with a duffle bag slung over each shoulder, a suitcase in each hand and a beach chair under each arm… in August… I’ve had time to contemplate each tread on each riser.

    Many times over.


    Me too…
    I may need to head over there tonight. :thumbsup2



    Good question and I may have to check into it.
    I suspect that any leftovers from the day are divided amongst the cooks and staff.
    A benefit of being part of the operation.



    Wonder if they’re hiring?
    :scratchin
     
  5. KatMark

    KatMark DIS Veteran

    Joined:
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    Oh...I must have one of those for my husband. And I think my sons' girls would like to have them too. :lmao::lmao::lmao: That is just awesome!

    Sounds like this is going to be an interesting expedition.

    And my mouth is already drooling over the ribs.
     
  6. Captain_Oblivious

    Captain_Oblivious DIS Dad #257

    Joined:
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    It reminds me of some other office supplies I've seen that I'd like to get for my office sometime. Here's one of the "nicer" notepads, and you can see other examples of some of the less family-friendly ones further down the page:

    Amazon link

    :rolleyes1

    True. I love good sauce (like Flame Tree), but tend to lean towards the tomato-based sauces.

    Now we're talking! :thumbsup2
     
  7. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
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    Life Update…



    Well…
    It’s certainly been a long while since I was able to actually work on this here TR.
    I’d ask if y’all missed me, but that’s really a rhetorical question that I already know the answer to.

    Life’s been a bit crazy ‘round my house. Firstly, this is about the worst time of year at work for finding time to do anything else. Then once I get home, I’m generally too brain dead to even consider writing. Considering how few brain cells I’ve left in the first place, you can see how devastating that could be.

    OK… so what about the weekends then, hummmmm…

    Nope, those have been consumed by matters musical and educational. If you’re unaware of it (meaning you haven’t yet been assaulted by my discussing it in the past), my son is a fairly good musician and a high school senior who wishes to continue studying his particular passion. That’s something I wasn’t able to do for myself so we’re trying our best to help Max accomplish the goal. To that end we’ve spent the last month of weekends traveling for auditions at several area universities. It is one thing to have the college accept you academically (and a number have), but then you still have to be accepted in to individual schools of music separately.

    While we were waiting to hear back from those efforts, we also spent one weekend traveling to see our boy perform as well. Along the way this year he succeeded in making the cut for the Senior All-State Honors Band as well. Of the couple thousand kids playing the same horn in the state of South Carolina, Max currently ranks eighth. It was a great experience for him to work with the other kids on that level and with the guest director that lead them through that weekend. Needless to say, the result was quite a performance and we were just tickled silly to see him doing so well.

    Since then we’ve actually heard back from the most important of the schools that he was attempting to get into and found out that he has been accepted into his first choice, that being the School of music at Western Carolina University in the mountains of NC. This is a smaller state school focusing on the arts and with one of the best music programs in the nation. We’re quite proud and also quite panicked. Currently we’re waiting to hear back from the financial folks up there about the grant situation and then we’ve got to figure out how we’re going to pay for ths foolishness. It’s going to be quite the ride that’s for certain.


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    That’s just about enough of me going on about my family. What say I get back to the TR. Maybe I should start by replying to Mark since he did take the time to comment in the first place.


    :lmao: I like ‘em. And I probably need to get me a few as well.


    Most do so you’re not alone. Oddly enough, I’m not at all a big fan of the mustard based type that SC is most known for.


    All you gott’a do is show up.


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    OK how about an actual Update?
    Won’t that be exciting?
    :sad2:



    Try to control you’re enthusiasm…
     
  8. afwdwfan

    afwdwfan DIS Dad #460

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    11,176
    Of course you're going to update when I'm already behind on everyone else's TRs and won't be around for a few days. :headache:


    Curse you!!!
     
  9. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
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    Chapter 3: A Lack of Adult Supervision





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    Part 2: Via Regia ​




    There are a number of common words in English the convey the concept of a road or path, but they all have their origins in descriptions of what was happening rather then where it was happening. “Path” descends from the Latin and Sanskrit “ped” and “pad” meaning: foot, thus a way to travel by foot. “Road”, on the other hand, evolved from the Middle English words: “rode” and “rade”, (a riding or mounted journey). For that reason a road was generally considered to be a rural way as contrasted with the more urban “street”. “Street”… that one comes directly from the Latin: “via strata” which means: “a way spread or paved, with stones”.

    All of these ideas have one other thing in common: “way”. That’s the oldest of the bunch and rolls all the way back to the Proto-Indo-European root: “wegh” (to move). It arrived in English “by way of” the Latin word: “via” (which oddly enough means: “by way of”). Them there “Latin’s”… the Romans that is… those folks were rather good at building “ways”. They put them down all over Europe and a considerable number of those vias are still in existence….


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    That last image is a good example of a Roman road and the cross section below shows how they would cut a drainage ditch along either side and then move the excavated earth toward the center. Several layers of substrate were put down with he ultimate top level being determined by the importance and final use of the Via in question. The result was consistent though: a raised way, a bit higher then the surrounding land, with a curved “crown” to allow the rain to roll off to either side. That physical height would later lead to the more important roads being referred to as “high-ways” (“byways”, a word with a similar origin, generally refer to private and toll roads). Now, if said road were deemed important enough for a monarch to consider providing maintenance for or even ensuring safe passage upon it as a vital interest to his kingdom, then it would be designated as a “Via Regia” (Royal Road or Kings Highway). And that circuitous (and purposely tortuous) introduction / dissertation finally brings us to the initial topic of this part of the TR…




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    The Kings Highway





    There were two such important trade roads with this moniker established during the infancy of the “New World”; one on either coast. “El Camino Real” as developed by the Spanish Missionaries on the left coast, and the one that Charles II directed his colonial governors to establish in 1650 ran along the Atlantic.


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    It’s the east coast version that we’ll be following part of this morning. Running from Boston to Charleston, it’s around 1,300 miles in total and is pretty much still intact. Now-a-days it’s US highways that demark and follow the route though. From Virginia to the southern terminus, that would specifically be the highway identified as US-17.. In fact, it’s even still named “Kings Highway” as you travel through Horry county, which is where we were starting our journey this morning (and by the way… “Horry” is not pronounced like it’s spelled… rather is: “Or’–ree”; one of a hand full of unique family names that you’ll see cropping up from time to time down this way.).

    So anyway, we’d decided that we were going to follow the Kings Highway a bit farther south, but first… it’s time for breakfast!


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    The “Garden City Pancake House” is one of many spots along the Kings that specialize in breakfast and most of them close up by dinnertime. Of those that I’ve tried in my time along the Grand Strand; this one rates somewhere in the middle. It’s good, but I’ve had a better break of the fast elsewhere. It did have the advantage of being very near our starting point and also on the way toward our ultimate destination. Oh and the staff here are quite friendly and accommodating, so it has that going for it as well… which is nice…

    Fast properly broken, we got back on the highway headed south. Into Georgetown county, past Muriel's Inlet (where you’ll find a large number of excellent seafood restaurants) and on down toward Pawley’s Island. That’s not just an area name, Pawley’s actually is and island, and a very fine high-end beach resort. Most of the homes are rentable and relaxation is the order of the day. I’ve never had the opportunity to actually “vacate” here, but ruminations from a TR authored by these very fine folks can tell you all about it.


    On this stretch of the road you’ll also encounter both Huntington Beach State Park and Brookgreen Gardens along the way toward Georgetown (across the street from each other actually).

    The park is a pristine strip of Atlantic beach; a fine campground and a designated nature preserve known as a “birders” haven.
    It even includes a “Moorish Castle” that can be toured during the summer…


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    The gardens (which share a common history) include one of the largest collections of outdoor figurative sculpture in the US, along with gorgeous Victorian style gardens, walking paths and trails.


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    While not everyone’s cup of tea (especially those with kids or even grown family members that find “culture” to be supremely boring and devoid both of thrill-rides and explosions), there are a few other offerings here to make it a bit more palatable. Things like the Lowcountry Zoo and even a Pontoon Boat “Creek Excursion” if you’d like to learn about the critters that inhabit the mashes and a little bit of local history. I can also pretty much guarantee that somewhere along the line you’ll encounter at least one of these critters…


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    The encounter may not be quite as “exciting” as say… this one was… but it’s a little something else you can use to convince the young’ens (and young’ens in mind) to tolerate a bit of time in a garden amongst a bunch of sculptures… “figurative sculptures”… have your tween boys look that last phrase up and they may well be requesting to spend time here. Oh, unfortunately none of this is free mind you, but it makes for an interesting diversion from the considerably more commercial offerings along The Stand.

    Moving on…

    The next thing along the Via Regia would be the city of Georgetown.


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    Believe it or not this town (that you may well never have heard of) use to be one of the wealthiest and most important seaports on the east coast. At least up until the 1860s when there was a minor (and necessary) change in the way labor was distributed. There’s still a good bit here to see though.
    Find the old part of town and poke around a bit. Trust me… its worth a little bit of time to check out.

    The next thing you encounter along US-17 is the Francis Marion National Forrest. The view through this part of the journey can best be summed up by this picture…


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    That’s pretty much the view you’re going to have for a long while until you get into the outskirts of Charleston (or more rather: Mount Pleasant). It’s not that there isn’t anything to get into in this area… there’s hiking, camping, hunting, fishing, and any number of other outdoor activities, but not too many that could be considered a part of a site-seeing excursion. There is one bit of tourist oriented commerce that does begin cropping up as you get closer to the Cooper River…


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    These “hand weaved” baskets are a staple of Charleston history and its modern tourist trade. They can also be a bit pricy (if they were actually weaved by hand that is… if the price seems reasonable or even cheep, it was probably manufactured by machine and imported from else where), If you’re interested in having one of these gems as proof of visitation, there are stands chock-full of ‘em all along US-17 coming into and back out of the Mt. Pleasant area. The town actually builds some of the stands and rents them out to the vendors so they’re actually more common then kudzu along this part of the road.

    We’ve almost made it to Charleston now and the end of the first part of our drive for the day. The official gateway into the city proper would be this rather picturesque suspension bridge…


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    To those of us from down this way though, that is considered to be the “new” bridge over the Cooper. The pair that I’ve crossed far more often in my time as a Carolinian were of a somewhat older vintage which you can get a bit of a glimpse of here (just scroll down a little bit).. Actually, I’ve got a more entertaining glimpse of the old bridges…


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    There ya’ go! I was actually able to work an explosion into this part of the TR.

    You’re welcome.


    Now then, just to be clear, I’ve seen all of these sites at one time or another but didn’t stop at any of them this day. So why exactly then did I spend so much time explaining some of the various sites that are available for you to enjoy on this often ignored stretch of road? And why did I make a point to add copious links throughout leading to other TRs and various information sources along the way?

    Well, it’s as a bit of an apology for what is about to happen next. Ya’ see…
    My friends (or at least one of them) are just about as geeky as I am and our destination for the day actually did not involve crossing that bridge and partaking of the many historic aspects of one of Americas oldest cities. No, we were going to make an actual left turn off of US-17 right at the foot of that bridge and get into something else (or more rather: get on board something else)…


    A ship…

    A couple of them actually…



    Sorry about that, but that’s where we were going. So, being as I spend far too much time discussing ships in the first place, it wont hurt my feelings one bit if you just skip the last part of this update (and probably the next couple as well).




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    Patriot’s Point





    Let’s say, just for a moment, that for some odd reason you were interested in exploring an Aircraft Carrier. Yes I know that the notion seems a might odd, but since you’re still reading, I’ll assume that you’re somewhat willing to go along with this preposterous notion. Now this goal could be accomplished by joining the US Navy (the ultimate experts on this type of vessel, as they maintain more of them then the entire rest of the world’s navies combined). Once enlisted you could then set about working toward being stationed aboard one. A might extreme as solutions go, but there are several retired examples that are more easily accessible (if you happen to be in the vicinity of one of them). In the eastern US there are three that can be explored. Sisters actually and all from the same class of WWII veterans.

    The USS Intrepid (CV-11) in New York City

    USS Lexington (CV-16) located in Corpus Christi Texas

    and the one that we were headed for…

    The USS Yorktown (CV-10) located at Patriots Point on the north side of Charleston Harbor.


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    There will also be one thing about this part of the TR that is a might different from most of my updates (and you better shield your eyes because I’m going to demonstrate it right here…


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    Pictures with people in ‘em (worse yet, pictures that I show up in form time to time). When on vacation, I’m generally the photographer (so I’m not usually in the images). The rest of my family is basically averse to being photographed so my wife and son rarely even allow me to post pictures that include them as part of the subject mater. On this trip however, all three of us were armed with cameras and being guys, we’re neither so bright nor not quite so proud. Heck, hen you’re this ugly, you can’t afford to be proud. Of the two goofs in that first “proof of visitation” image, I’m the really ugly one. The other fellow on the left there is Billy; one of my best friends and a fellow ship geek. The guy taking the picture in this instance was Sal (short for Salvatore, you’ll see him in a minute or two). Another good friend who thankfully ain’t so much of a ship geek, but wanted to join us on the expedition just because we were going. A good reason if ever I’ve heard one.

    Anyway, we were actually here today specifically to get aboard on of the smaller ships at the museum: The USS Lafffey (DD-724)…


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    “The ship that would not die”, is a highly decorated vessel that had just recently returned to the museum after nearly three years of renovations (and desperate attempts to avoid the scrap yard, complete the repairs and then bring her back to the museum). The triumphant return only a couple of weeks earlier just reinforced her justly earned epithet. For that reason we wanted to check out the work done.

    Is it happens, we’d have been better off waiting a few more week s before heading down here. Exploring the upper decks of the Laffey was allowed, but the exhibits on the lower decks were still under renovation and closed to the public. Ehhh… win some, loose some, but we did get aboard…


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    There’s Sal, next to that ugly guy. We were inspecting the aft five inch gun turret at the time. From there we worked through the artifacts and historical exhibits on the main deck and then headed up to the boat deck and the ships bridge. While I was trying to take a picture across the bow and toward the marina, Bill decided to snap one of me doing so…


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    Honestly! I think he could have chosen a better subject. If you’ve never been aboard a naval ship (museum or otherwise) you’ll quickly learn that the stairwells are better described as ladders with handrails so you might want to watch you step…


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    Now, from this point I could bore you with a couple hundred detail shots of the inside of the ship, but I do that kind of thing far too often. Given that fact I’ll be nice and restrain myself. For now at least, so I guess it’s time to move on…


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    However… if you were to inadvertently click on that last image, it will take you to an excellent little video that walks you around the vessel and explains a lot about what you actually looking at.

    Really! Try it!




    Like I said, time to push on. We weren’t going to come all this way and not also explore the Yorktown while we were here. When you first board the carrier you’ll end up on the main hanger deck where all the aircraft were stored and maintained…


    [​IMG]


    There are a lot of exhibits on this deck alone and I do mean “a lot”. It’s the perfect spot for two ship geeks to… well… to basically geek out!


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    And we certainly did. Again, I’m going to spare you the bulk of the pictures taken but there is one exhibit in this part of the ship that actually confuses a lot of folks.

    This one…


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    What you’re looking at there is a mock up of the “Freedom 7” Mercury space capsule and the Apollo-8 Command Module. Now why would those be there? I actually heard someone asking that very question but I also got the feeling that they really didn’t want me butting into their conversation to explain it. This being a monologue however, you are not so lucky. Unlike the Russians, NASA figured that a parachute assisted landing of a space capsule would work a bit better over water then over a Kazakhstani desert (a somewhat more pliable surface to be sure). But once one of these voyagers would “splash down”, they’d obviously needed to be rescued from the waves by somebody and generally that somebody was the crew of one of the Navy’s carriers.


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    For Apollo-8 astronauts: Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders, the first folks to ever orbit the moon, That someone who would pluck them out of the drink was the crew of the USS Yorktown. So that’s why you’ll find a NASA exhibit aboard a naval museum.


    Well, that’s about all the room I’ve got for one post. Here’s just one more image of the Hanger Deck as we started heading up toward the Fight Deck.


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    I’ll save that and the rest of what is available here at Patriots Point for the next update.

    Hopefully I won’t have so many outside distractions to interfere with my pointless aspirations as a writer and I’ll get that worked up just a bit sooner. Or maybe it would be better for everyone if I encountered more distractions.


    Naaaaaaa…


    You ain’t gott’a read this mess, but do gott’a write it.



    Next up: Busted Subs, Hollow Planes, Southeast Asia and the Cold War…
    A memorial in several parts.
     
  10. Captain_Oblivious

    Captain_Oblivious DIS Dad #257

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,565
    You know, I come here to escape work...

    I think I remember seeing that one on our travels. It's kind of cool to be able to recognize certain places from the photos.

    :scratchin Sounds interesting... :rotfl:

    (and thanks for the plug!)

    Yeah, I can't say that stretch of road was among my favorite drives ever.

    :cool1::woohoo::banana:

    And then NOT be an idiot and make a right to get back on the bridge...:sad2:

    You? Getting on ships? Get outta here.


    Sounds familiar...

    Sold.

    Wish we'd had the time to check that one out.

    ::yes::

    Patriots Point was a great place to visit. Well worth the time, and it's fun to be able to re-visit it. I'm sure you'll spot plenty of things we missed.
     
  11. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,194
    Yah…
    I figured you’d appreciate that chunk of my musings.


    “Ain’t I a stinker?”


    You’re welcome.
    You had more pictures of Pawley’s then I did.
    I figured the few poor slobs reading my TR needed some kind of diversion.


    I’ve done the same in the past, but baclk then it was those old bridges that you’d end up on.
    A bit more, shall we say, “exciting”…



    Who’d a thunk?
    What do you figure the odds are that it won’t happen in the next chapter as well?
    :rolleyes:


    A couple that you didn’t have time for, but y’all got farther around the Carrier then we did that day. I’ll ‘splaine that a little latter on. As for right now…

    I think I need to abuse Andy a little bit more by putting up part-2 of my monster Bonus Feature that I’m completely blaming him for.
     
  12. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,194

    Bonus Feature 2: A Ship in the Desert





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    Part 2: A River Ran Through It





    The difference between a lush Eden and a baron desert will very often come down to one thing…

    a river.

    Just ask the ancient Egyptians. Where rivers exist unhindered, there is plenty; where they are lacking, you’re dependant on access to aquifers and often-unpredictable weather cycles.


    Oh, by the way…
    This is the second part of that nasty bonus feature I threatened to assault you with.
    Time to make good on the threat.

    Back to my incessant droning on about nothing…

    As I was saying… Rivers giveth and they can taketh away. This notion of a lost waterway is also an accepted plot devise in books and film. It was this idea that was used by one author to place a Confederate ironclad in the middle of the Sahara. That book later became the adventure film that has been keeping us company through this disaster thus far. Supposedly a former tributary of the Niger River had dried up and stranded the “CSS Texas”. The search for this ship in a desert, lead the protagonists to some interesting encounters on a still existing river …


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    That little clip (and subsequent explosions) is offered up here as a bit of an apology for what is about to happen. There may or may not be more along the way but you’ll have to suffer through this mess to find out. Well except for any cameo appearances by Penelope Cruz… I’m pretty sure that you’d be able to spot those by just quickly scrolling down.






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    See what I mean…




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    Nonsense





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    Notice anything wrong with that map?

    A lot of folks are somewhat geography challenged, but if you lived in the Midwestern U.S. I’m pretty sure that the problem makes itself readily apparent. Can you imagine the city of Chicago, or Milwaukee or Green Bay as land locked without ports or a lakefront of any kind? Or that Michigan would no longer have an upper peninsula? Or that the a drive from Racine to Grand Rapids (assuming you had to make such) would no longer entail traveling through either Illinois or Indiana, but instead would be a trek directly across a baron desert covered in nothing more then scrub grasses?


    Inconceivable!


    Imagine the Mackinac Bridge spanning nothing more then a chasm…


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    Or being able to explore a famous shipwreck… on foot…

    Preposterous right?


    That map should and does look like this (for now)…


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    I mean seriously, how could the world’s fifth largest expanse of fresh water simply shrivel up and leave only a small shadow of its original self? Obviously this notion is utter foolishness, right?


    Well in a word… No.


    You see Lake Michigan actually use to be the worlds sixth largest lake, and Huron use to be fifth. They both moved up because the forth-largest lake in the world has virtually disappeared from the map. Were y’all aware of this? I’m pretty geo-savvy, but it’s not something I ever heard discussed in print or on the Telle. Nor was this fact ever taught in school (although that’s because when I was in school, it hadn’t actually happened yet, or rather it was just beginning). What went wrong and why were we unaware of it?




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    The Vanishing Sea





    If you have a globe in your house anywhere and you were to spin it around to central Asia you’d easily be able to find the Caspian Sea. That is actually the world’s largest lake. Just a few hundred miles to the east, creating part of the boarder between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, you’ll find the Aral Sea; the world’s forth largest body of fresh water.


    [​IMG]


    Don’t believe me? Check Google maps if you want, but if you were to switch the view to the satellite image, it ain’t there any more.


    [​IMG]


    So what happened here?

    Well, the rivers that feed into it died. Actually they were murdered but I digress. The Amu Darya and Syr Darya were at one time among the longer rivers descending from the Himalayas, but both of them are so heavily used as sources for irrigating crops (mostly cotton which has no real business being grown in the area), that there is little water left to flow into the Aral. The Amu no longer even makes in to the basin and simply ends miles short of its former delta. The change has been both drastic and disturbing…


    [​IMG]


    … and has had a huge impact on the entire area that can best be seen by exploring what was once a major port city on the Aral Sea.




    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
    Moynoq





    [​IMG]


    The welcome sign at Moynoq still includes images of the water and the thriving fishing industry that use to be here. For that matter, it overlooks a scrub brush valley that was at one time an inlet of the Aral Sea. However, Uzbekistan’s only major port and formally one of the largest fishing concerns in Asia is now a virtual ghost town…


    [​IMG]


    Entire fleets use to call this harbor home…


    [​IMG]


    But now the receding waters have left them stranded.

    At the northern extreme of this dead city there is a simple monument, which overlooks a cliff and keeps a silent watch over what would seem to be an endless expanse of desert.


    [​IMG]


    That expanse was once the floor of the Aral Sea. There is still water beyond the horizon, but it’s now hundreds of miles to the northwest. This “cliff” was part of a quay and marks where the main harbor was located. Better then thirty feet beneath its “summit’ (the original depth of the harbor) rests the town’s only remaining “tourist attraction”…


    [​IMG]


    A fleet of fishing trawlers that were left first by the sea and then by their captains to become an additional monument to the disaster…


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    And these hulks are not alone. Across the expanse of the dried seabed and in other former port towns are additional examples of these incongruent steal monoliths …


    [​IMG]


    Most of the destruction in the Aral Sea has been somewhat recent. Water levels dropped slowly through the 60s and 70s as more and more water was diverted for irrigation. When I graduated from school, it was still one of the ten largest lakes on earth. But in the 80s and 90s the levels reached the point where much of the lake was now very shallow. Without the rivers to feed it, the rate of evaporation became astronomical and the receding shore line far more noticeable.

    With the lake now barely a tenth of is original size, tens of thousands of square miles of the old seabed are now exposed to new elements. The weather is no longer moderated by the water and remaining residents across the region live with ravaging summer heat and harsher winters. Nothing impedes the wind and the sandy lakebed, thoroughly polluted by fertilizer and pesticide runoff from the cotton operations, now generates poisonous dust storms. Giving up the cotton industry and ending the diversion of the rivers could reverse this damage, but given the devastated economies of the entire region, that is extremely unlikely.

    Traveling across this wasteland would be enough to dishearten even the most confidant adventurer…


    [​IMG]




    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
    N I M B Y





    [​IMG]


    Being such a distant and impoverished place (which also lacks appreciable oil deposits) it’s pretty easy to see why we would not have heard much about this actual “Dead Sea”. It’s also easy to blame the planned economy of the former Soviet Republics for their mismanagement. We placate ourselves by believing that such things obviously couldn’t happen in the West.


    But is it really all that obvious?


    The picture at the beginning of this section is a former marina on Lake Mead. Created by the Hoover Dam, Mead has been steadily dropping for some time now. In fact, the Colorado River that it resides on is one of the most heavily diverted and drawn on waterway in the US. Between the drying weather trends occurring worldwide and the greater need to acquire additional civic water resources (especially in the western states), similar sights to those in Asia have begun to crop up a bit closer to home.

    Once the Colorado enters Mexico and encounters the Morelos Dam, what little flow was left is almost completely diverted for irrigation. The result…


    [​IMG]


    The river rarely ever makes it through its own delta to the ocean.

    The Colorado is not alone in its plight either. The other great border river between the US and Mexico, the Rio Grand, also runs dry at numerous places due to civic and agricultural diversions…


    [​IMG]


    And like its sister river, there are times of the year when it simply won’t make it to the Gulf…


    [​IMG]


    So it’s the loss of natural rivers that can account for why there actually are ships stranded in deserts. And if we continue on our current path, there may well be new deserts in the making with all manner of structures stranded within them.





    It may just be time for desperate measures…




    [​IMG]

    Or we could just wait and see what happens
     
  13. afwdwfan

    afwdwfan DIS Dad #460

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    11,176
    Maybe you should send Mark an e-mail telling him how to do his job? :confused3 :lmao:

    Did somebody say "thrill rides and explosions???"

    :thumbsup2

    :headache:

    Don't forget airplane geeks... :rolleyes1

    Oh yeah, and don't forget space geeks either.

    I don't think I'd have been able to bite my tongue when overhearing someone ask about that one. How quickly we forget our American history. 40 some years ago, people would have watched one of those being fished out of the water on the news, now it is ancient history.:sad2:

    And that's why we won the race to the moon. :thumbsup2 :rotfl2:

    I hope that never happens. There's already too much Wisconsin and Michigan. They don't need to get any bigger. :rolleyes1

    No... not at all. I guess I learned something today.

    I used to think I was. Apparently not.

    That's why crops should be grown here in God's country where the rain provides our only source of irrigation.

    Although man made irrigation would have been nice this past summer. :headache:

    I tossed you a softball and you hit a home run. Nice job. :thumbsup2 :rotfl2:
     
  14. Captain_Oblivious

    Captain_Oblivious DIS Dad #257

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,565
    Hey, it worked for Seinfeld.

    Lately some scientists are telling us this will happen all over the world. Others are saying it's ridiculous. So...I have no idea.

    Pretty amazing. Also amazing that no one saw this coming.

    Like I said, I come here to avoid work...

    Who would have ever thought you'd write a sentence like that?

    It'll probably get lost in the pile.
     
  15. KatMark

    KatMark DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Messages:
    41,835
    I won't even pretend to understand what that was all about. It's a girl thing and most of us don't get into that stuff, but it was an interesting update. And the important thing is you enjoyed it.

    And I do love how you insert pictures from movies in your updates.

    Have a great Easter (I probably won't be on much this weekend as the kids are coming in from Iowa).
     
  16. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,194
    I considered inferring that he was probably old enough to have learned the craft directly form them, but since I’m older then both of ya’ (and probably both of ya’ combined)…

    It just didn’t seem like the right road to take…
    :lmao:



    WHAT? YOUR GONN’A HAVE TO SPEAK UP…
    I CAN’T HEAR YA’ OVER ALL THE THRILL RIDES AND EXPLOSIONS.




    Guilty as charged on that one too…



    Guilty again. And…
    I really, really wanted to but in but just didn’t see where I could get a word in edge wise with them. :rolleyes:

    Given what NASA pulled of with what was actually relative limited resources and technology, Mercury, Gemini and Apollo have to rank as among the most audacious bits of exploration ever attempted. We are greatly indebted to the folks that work those programs.


    Yep…
    The truly sad thing though, is that the only currently operation method left for returning a space travel back to terra firma is that controlled collision with a Kazakhstani desert :sad2:


    :lmao:
    I’d have waited to see if Barry wanted to comment on that one, but he’s been too busy not updating his own TRs of late to even bother attacking this pitiful effort.




    I learned it as well…
    And it’s your fault this whole thing got started in the first place.
    :rotfl2:


    Y’all had it rough last year. That drought was one of the worst encountered across that region. May that not repeat itself.


    Thanks. From you… that’s high praise.

    You feeling alright? I’m a might worried about you here…
    you may need to go see a doctor ya’ know.
     
  17. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    6,194
    Up to a point… :lmao:

    Global warming aside, this particular disaster was purely the doing of people.
    You gott’a want to divert a whole river to sustain a thirsty crop inn an arid location.


    Interestingly though, some of my research that touched on the climate issue forecasts the opposite problem in a warming situation. Adding major ice sheets into the oceans in liquid form could make a couple of changes to the map that would include shortening my drive to the coast by about 2.5 hours and possibly converting most of the states along the Mississippi back into the shallow ocean floor that they once were an era or two back.



    I think that they were able to ignore it for the first twenty-five years or so because the effect was more subtle at first. It was easy to explain away or just live with the early stages of the receding coast line. Besides, at that point it didn’t effect very may people (and those folks were merely the working poor anyway) so the majority had nothing to worry about. The shock came once it had become a run-away process and that was more sudden. By then they were unable to do anything constructive. Very sad all around. The pesticides and other pollutants carried along in the dust storms that now rage across that area are devastating to the lungs of the folks who still live there. Iironically most of them are working the cotton farms that were the direct cause of both the pollution and loss of the Aral in the first place (the fisherman are long gone).


    Hear stuff like that a lot do ya’? :lmao:
    It’s imposable to do any civil project without angering someone.

    It saddened me to write it.




    No sense in piling on then ehhh?
     
  18. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,194


    Well… I generally do say right up front that you ought not be reading the bonus features in the first place.
    Actually, I think I even said on page-1 that no one should read this TR at all. :lmao:

    Sorry ‘about that chief. I will grant you that there’s not much in chapter-three here that you’re likely going to find very interesting. Now in the upcoming chapter-four however, we’ll be headed to Colonial Williamsburg and that trip includes a mix of amusement park and museum related interactions. So it will get better. It still won’t be Disney… but it will get better. Really!

    If you’d like I’ll just send you a note when I get past all this boring stuff.
    But I do thank you for being one of my few readers though (difficult as it may be).
     
  19. afwdwfan

    afwdwfan DIS Dad #460

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    11,176
    And that is why I'm a space geek. One of the highlights of my life was getting to go to space camp when I was in 8th grade. When I was little I'd always say I want to be an astronaut when I grow up.

    In the grand scheme of things that early space program just blows my mind to think about what they did with what little technology they had to use. Even now with super computers that will caculate every little detail, leaving the astronauts on board to only have to flip a switch based on a prompt, it would take years to get new equipment in place to acheive space flight (if we had the funding, that is :sad2:), yet back in those days it was a new method of travel being put into place every few years and it was just 8 years and a couple of months from the time we put the first man in orbit to the time we had someone standing on the moon. As many times as I've sat and thought about this, it still just blows my mind.

    I wish people today would have the desire, motiviation and will to make things like that happen.

    Sorry for the highjack.


    Sad indeed.

    It's great. You can take cheap shots at Barry's expense and he doesn't even know it. And it isn't like you're talking about him behind his back, it is posted right there on threads he "reads." :rotfl2::lmao::rotfl:
     
  20. KatMark

    KatMark DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Messages:
    41,835
    Barry who???????:p
     
  21. GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes

    GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes Dis Dad #469 . . . . "Nation Ford", SC

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,194
    Space Camp! That… is very cool sir.

    And never mind any perceived hijacking…
    This TR needs all the help it can get (and you know it).



    He’s been so busy lately that he can only rarely even comment on the DDC threads. His chances of getting back to this TR anytime soon are mighty low. Right now only you, Mark and Kat are even pretending to read this nonsense.

    Makes me wonder about y’all just a might.
    Like I said earlier. I’m worried about ya'.
     

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