How the Rich skip the lines at Disney - rent a disabled tour guide.

Discussion in 'Disney Rumors and News' started by tmgandolph, May 14, 2013.

  1. teentoddlermom

    teentoddlermom DIS Veteran

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    My son is Paraplegic and my niece is has very strong special needs on the Autism spectrum. Anyone who abuses GAC's without a disability has a reservation being held in HEdouble hockey sticks for them. The world is a pretty unfriendly place to disabled people and ADA enforcement is sometimes is pretty scant. This story is a horrible reflection on the worst types of human beings. Shame shame shame.:furious:
     
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  3. skier_pete

    skier_pete None

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    What I am seeing is this is coming from an author who wrote a book about the behavior of the 1 %. What's sensationalizing it is that they are talking about skipping lines at Disney, and using diabled people to do it.

    Now, is anyone really surprised that the rich do things that are unethical and don't believe the rules for the rest of us apply to them? That is often how they got there to begin with - by stepping on the backs of others.

    But, truthfully, isn't this something anyone that's been on these boards have heard before. We've all heard stories of people using "grandma in a wheelchair who doesn't really need it" to "skip the lines". The thing is, Disney has done a lot over the years to make it more "fair" for those disabled. It used to be they got first priority, now it is not quite that good a situation.

    Even so, don't we all know that Disney has VIP program for the rich anyways? They mention in the article that hiring this guide is cheaper, but is it really that much of a difference? I though the Disney VIP was like $150 a hour as well.

    Look, I don't disagree that if this is true that it is wrong, but I think it's making a mountain (albeit a small one) out of a molehill.
     
  4. Coach81

    Coach81 DIS Veteran

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    hmmmm something is indeed fishy...
     
  5. Lolsmum

    Lolsmum DIS Veteran

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    Where do you draw the line?

    We plan to go to WDW with my mother and stepfather next year. She generally uses a wheelchair due to nerve damage in her leg. She can walk short distances but cannot stand in a line for long (or anywhere for long). The whole point of our trip is for us all to go together, so they can have a trip to WDW with their grandchildren. Should my mother ride every ride alone while we go through the regular lines? We don't want to cut the lines at all, but to ride together, just as we would if she were able to stand in the lines. Are three other adults and two children too much?
     
  6. Cheshire Figment

    Cheshire Figment <font color=red><marquee behavior=alternate>Friend

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    The lines for almost all attractions at WDW are "mainstreamed". This means that the queue is set up to allow wheelchairs and/or ECVs to go through the line just as a person without a mobility problem. As it was built prior to the ADA, the Magic Kingdom is most likely to have non-mainstreamed lines. Some attractions, such as Splash Mountain and Haunted Mansion you will go part way through the regular queue and then be diverted. Other attractions, such as Big Thunder Mountain or SpaceShip Earth you will initially be directed to an accessible entrance.

    All the theaters are set up with seats (usually in the back row) removed so a wheelchair or ECV can pull into a space and there will be regular seating on either side of the space for the others in the party.

    Where there are quantity limits on space, or other limitation involving accessibility, you may have to wait longer to see a show or ride an attraction than people without disabilities.

    The normal (and official) response of Guest Relations to people with mobility and/or stamina issues is to recommend rental of a wheelchair or ECV. The Guest Assistance Card (GAC) is intended for "invisible" disabilities not related to mobility or stamina. A wheelchair or ECV is sufficient to notify Cast Members of special assistance normally needed. However, if a person has other issues, such as auditory or visual, they would probably also need a GAC.

    Note that a GAC is not intended to allow bypassing of lines, and it so states on the card itself. The only people who will get the special Front Of The Line GAC are where a terminal or medically fragile child is traveling on a trip from Make A Wish or similar foundation.
     
  7. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    Keep your group together as you please and let others get over it.
     
  8. jimsanfilippo

    jimsanfilippo Mouseketeer

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    You are 100% correct. No one in the top 1% would bat an eye at $300/hr instead of using the $120/hr scam "service".
     
  9. jimsanfilippo

    jimsanfilippo Mouseketeer

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    I think what was meant is that the rules of a fair society were broken, not the WDW rules.
     
  10. brerrabbit

    brerrabbit Sixth Generation Native Texan

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    I have read the article, gone to the companies web sight and posted on several threads on this on other boards. While I find the practice distasteful I also see a very big irony at work as well and a potential for some harm moving forward.

    First a question. Are there varying levels of GAC's? I mean your an otherwise healthy teenager who happened to break a bone somewhere in the leg 3 weeks before vacation so you get a wheelchair to tour the park and therefore can't manage the ques but are otherwise fine and that's a level 1 GAC, or is your child in a motorized wheelchair with both physical and mental challenges that means you get a level2 GAC?

    The reason the answer to question is important is because if you get the same GAC either way then why would anyone immoral enough to pay someone to use theirs not just get their own and save the money. In otherwords was the lady from New York stupid enough to pay $130 for something she could have got for free?

    Another point is if in fact the GAC is being abused (I don't use and never have used and pass no judgement on those who do) will this lead to a devaluing of the system? I mena in economic theroy the harder something desirable is to attain the more perceived value it has. Once everyone can get it then it's value diminishes tremendously. So if everyone shows up for the GAC and is given one then the GAC lines start to exceed the FP and standby lines so what have you gained.

    A final note, if in fact the answer to my first question is in fact that a GAC is a GAC and there are not different ones then if people with legitimate physical limitations can make $130 an hour off of stupid people with that much disposable income then good for them.
     
  11. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    Getting upset because someone broke imaginary rules doesn't make much sense to me
     
  12. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    A GAC is not a GAC. They give various accommodations based on a guests individual needs. Also, a guest who is in a wheelchair but has no other needs would not get a GAC, at all, since the accommodations that he needs is obvious.

    The rich person in the article paid for a tour guide, so she apparently received touring services not just access with the handicapped tour guide.

    Also, there is no abuse here. People who are touring with a guest who is in a wheelchair use whatever line that guest uses. This isn't abuse.

    Finally, your economic theory idea doesn't work because these people actually don't have an advantage. In fact they can have a fairly real disadvantage (beyond the obvious).
     
  13. Tonka's Skipper

    Tonka's Skipper DIS Veteran

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    I totally agree, :thumbsup2this is not about 1 family with a member, with a real disability.



    This is about people hiring a guide to be part of their group and get them in ahead of everyone else. They are indeed abusing the GAC and disability rules, not to mention good manners.

    This shows a over the top lack of manners, rudeness and lack of character and not knowing what is right and wrong. Not to mention its a hell of a thing to teach their kids!

    It is particularly hurtful to the folks that do have real disabilities, especially as there is more and more talk about changing the GAC system , which may do more harm then good!


    As I mentioned before just because you can do something , does NOT mean you should do something!


    I hope Disney's investigation will stop the practice!::yes::
    AKK
     
  14. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    The tour guide apparently does have a 'real' disability. There is nothing wrong with her party using whatever access method that she does. Nor is there anything wrong with a disabled person becoming a tour guide.
     
  15. doconeill

    doconeill Fastpass Jedi Master DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    If it wasn't something of a problem, Disney wouldn't be investigating it now. They would have ignored or issued a statement.

    Of course, that would have created a huge boom in the "disabled guide" business. Not that it wouldn't be a bad thing on the job front, but then a lot more people would be doing it, and it would just cause it to collapse.

    It could be that this is against the authorized guide rules. Then again, I'm sure there is a healthy underground guide business too.

    I probably didn't post it in this thread but one of the others...Disney can use their nextgen technology to solve this. Instead of allowing into an alternate line/entrance, issue a "Fastpass", with a return time based on the current standby time, and a narrow return time. Exclude them from being able to do this at another attraction until it expires. Essentially, the "Accessible Fastpass" is their virtual queue position, but they don't have to wait in the standby line still.
     
  16. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    The mere fact that a company looks into an issue doesn't mean that there is a problem.
     
  17. Tonka's Skipper

    Tonka's Skipper DIS Veteran

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    I have stated the common courtesy/manners a society lives by and why it is indeed abuse. Reading the posts in various threads, it seems all but you agree.


    Disney in investigating, the tours are shut down at least for now leads anyone to see there is a problem doing this.

    I have nothing to add.


    AKK
     
  18. doconeill

    doconeill Fastpass Jedi Master DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    From the CNN article:
    Certainly sounds like Disney considers this a problem if it is happening.
     
  19. Tonka's Skipper

    Tonka's Skipper DIS Veteran

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    I agree!:thumbsup2
     
  20. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    It is unacceptable to abuse these accommodations. That doesn't mean that they have found that the was an abuse. Ou are reading into that statement more than there is.
     
  21. dadddio

    dadddio DIS Veteran

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    Common manners/courtesy/sense are arguments that we frequently see, but the reality of t is that these things don't actually exist.
     

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