How strict are CMs with height restrictions

Discussion in 'Theme Parks Attractions and Strategies' started by mommak1, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. JeRmS

    JeRmS Mouseketeer

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    Primeval Whirl being 48" makes absolutely no sense to me .. my DD5 was so upset that she couldn't ride, she barely missed it but she could ride the big mountain (Expedition Everest)

    I'm not sure how Primeval Whirl is more "Thrill" than EE and therefore would require a larger height requirement?
     
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  3. mesaboy2

    mesaboy2 DIS Veteran

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    It's not based on thrill factor, but on minimum safety requirements for the ride vehicle.
     
  4. JeRmS

    JeRmS Mouseketeer

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    Meh :rolleyes2 I guess, but I don't see how my 48 1/4" daughter is more safe on that ride than my 47 3/4" daughter?

    but alas, not to start an argument on that subject we will just keep riding EE anyway since it's waaaaay more fun than PEW.
     
  5. bauer1168

    bauer1168 DIS Veteran

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    I *think* it is due to the particular ride and if an emergency stop has to be made or not with a mechanical failure. I know certain rides are more sudden and can cause a more severe break with an emergency stop or track failure.
    I personally would hate to be on primeval whirl if that was to happen
     
  6. mesaboy2

    mesaboy2 DIS Veteran

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    If I was in the theme-park attraction design business, I'd be able to help you there. Alas, I am not.
     
  7. maxiesmom

    maxiesmom The Mean Squinty Eye Works

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    I doubt it is, but I don't know, as I did not design the ride.;) In reality, the cut off point has to be somewhere, right? And they can't come out and say "You have to be around 44" to ride, we will guesstimate when you are there."
     
  8. bauer1168

    bauer1168 DIS Veteran

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    Just checking the book 'Stories from a Theme Park Insider', the author, a former cm mentions what is the 'safety brake' which is in certain parts of the track, to stop the trains, spinny things or whatever they're called on primeval whirl from running into one another.
    Apparently the safety brake can stop a vehicle running upto 30 miles an hour in eight feet, resulting in a hard, hard stop. It is the one thing you do not want to hit if you are shorter than the height requirement for that ride, or are pregnant, have a back, neck or heart condition.
     
  9. JeRmS

    JeRmS Mouseketeer

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    self edited :-)
     
  10. rgf207

    rgf207 DIS Veteran

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    That's ok. You don't have to. That's why Disney sets the limits. There has to be a cutoff somewhere. You have to be 16 to drive. That's not saying that someone who's 15 3/4 can't drive. A cutoff was established for safety and that's how it is.
     
  11. mesaboy2

    mesaboy2 DIS Veteran

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    Likely recommended by the ride designers. I don't think anyone here can actually answer your question.
     
  12. chartle

    chartle DIS Veteran

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    Its has to do with ALL the forces that a body must be able to handle. EE has mostly positive and negative, up and down, G forces and a small amount of side to side G forces due to banked curves.

    Primeval Whirl has about the same, probably less, positive and negative G forces but considerably more side to side forces since while you are going slower does not have banked curves. The spinning of course just adds to the overall forces.

    Up and down forces are easier to design for since you are mostly being pushed into seat with sometimes you felling like you are being pushed out of your seat like at the top of a hill. In the roller coaster world this is called "Air Time". Most coasters have a lot more pushed into your seat forces versus air time.

    Side to side forces are harder to deal with since they are pushing you OFF your seat to the side, AKA being thrown out of your seat.

    Thats why some rides that seem more "tame" have higher height requirements.

    At my home park, Kennywood, the Hyper coaster, The Phantom's Revenge goes 85 mph and drops 228' and has a 48 inch height requirement. The older slower (55 mph, 95 foot drop) Thunderbolt has a 52" limit due to its greater side to side forces.

    Note I am not a ride designer nor do I play one on TV. Though my sons and I have played Roller Coaster Tycoon for more hours than we want to admit and at one time my oldest wanted to be a roller coaster designer. Decided Chemical Engineering was better but is now a Math major.
     

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