How much does it cost to get and own a cat?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by tigercat, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. tigercat

    tigercat <font color=magenta>Cook, clean and foot massage.

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    Just back from going to different store. This one had several kittens and a couple of cats. There was one that she really liked and really liked to cuddle. There were some 3 month old one's with their Mum as well that were really cute. She is upset right now because we didn't buy the cuddly cat, but she was told that she needed to have the money first. She is working a couple of extra shifts towards it but I think she got her heart set on the one cat that cuddled her. She was upset when I said that we had to go.
    I go away next week for 9 days so she will have to wait until I get home. She, like the rest of the family really likes to get what they want when they want it and get upset when they can't get it. They all learn they have to wait.
    tigercat
     
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  3. cornflake

    cornflake DIS Veteran

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    I assume these were rescue cats to adopt, right?

    If that's correct, call the organization that did the adoption thing, or the store that hosted them to get the # and reserve the kitten she wants. If you can say it'll be like two weeks but you definitely want that kitten, they'll usually hold it for you and she can earn the money in the meantime. They may ask for info or a part of the payment or something but people do 'reserve' cats that they can't take because they're about to go on vacation or whatever.

    Also, there may be paperwork from the shelter and stuff to fill out, you can do all that now.
     
  4. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    I seriously doubt that the kitten will be there 9 days from now. Kittens go quickly. I saw my kitten online at the pound. I called about it. They told me she would be spayed the next morning and and wouldn't be available to that afternoon. I cornered them into giving me a specific time.

    I showed up at that time. She was quite groggy but showed me enough of her personality for me to know she was the right cat for me, over her sister that looked just like her. I took her home that day.

    The next morning, I looked at the website again and her sister was gone also.


    Why don't you try paying for the cat up front, asking the store to hold & take care of it for the 9 days, then when you get back, you & DD can pick the cat up?

    In case someone else hasn't already mentioned it on the thread, you don't really get to pick the cat, they pick YOU. IF GRDD has said that's the one, then that probably is the cat who chose her. Hope it's still there tomorrow before it goes to someone else.
     
  5. skater

    skater <font color=blue>Change sometimes stinks.. doesn't

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    As for the wet vs. dry debate - just google it. Then decide for yourself.
     
  6. tigercat

    tigercat <font color=magenta>Cook, clean and foot massage.

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    Actually it will take her at least 3 to 4 weeks to get enough money to pay for the kitten and necessities. She has now seen 2 kittens that have picked her so I know that there will be others down the line. This has to be something she is doing by herself so that she knows the cost and is prepared for it. She will probably be moving out to go to school next year and taking the kitten with her. I know that she won't be moving back with her mum as her mum is allergic to cats.
    I know that it is hard for her to wait but she really does need to be realistic about this. I don't want her getting a kitten on a whim, she needs to know for certain that this is what she wants and is able to pay for it. She is 18 yrs old.
    The kitten will live here until she moves out so she doesn't have to worry about vacations or the kitten being left alone. With 5 of us in the house we don't go on vacations together and the house very rarely has no one in it overnight. If fact I can't remember the last time that happened.
    tigercat
     
  7. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    Ah, knowing she's 18 makes a difference. I thought maybe she was about 11 and you could pay up front and have her pay you back as she gets the money. But, at 18, it is a good exercise in saving up money for items, budgeting and saving extra to have around for times like these, when those "gotta have it" purchases come along. And yes, making sure she really wants a cat.

    You mentioned she's going away to college. She won't be able to have a kitten in the dorms. Also some housing situations won't allow college kids to have/bring animals as they often abandon them at the end of the semesters when they go back home. This will greatly curtail her options for housing.

    A cat expense will also cut into her "fun" money. And if she goes away for the weekend with other college friends, she will have to have someone look out for the cat while she's gone.

    And if she gets a boyfriend and spends considerable time at his place, and he doesn't like cats, or she doesn't want to keep bringing a litter box & carrier with her, it's really not fair to the cat to leave it alone for hours/days on end. Especially if she gets a more cuddly cat, that likes human interaction, over a more independent & aloof one.

    My kitty gets bereft & anxious when I am gone too long. It breaks my heart to hear her still crying for me by the door, even after I've returned. She forgets that I am finally home and cries. I call to her and she comes running to me. This goes on for 2-3 days even after I've returned, until she's secure enough that I am really back. :sad1:

    Some things for her to think about.
     
  8. Hannathy

    Hannathy <font color=darkorchid>When I stop laughing I will

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    I'm a cat person and I'm all for adopting kittens but I just saw something that I have to jump on!!!!!!

    You say she is moving out to go to school. She probably should not get a cat now then! The vast majority of apartments near schools do not allow pets. Or at least pets with fur. All the apartments my DD inquired about did not allow anything with fur. You could have fish and some allowed reptile type things but most even said no to Hamsters or mice.

    The one that she found that allowed them charged an extra fee every month that wasn't in a college students budget. So she should check a few things out first unless Grandma plans on keeping the cat for her during the school year. And dorms for sure wont allow one.
     
  9. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    OR, they may require female cats only, as they have concerns about male cats spraying.

    When I got my kitty, I was temporarily living elsewhere and moving around. I purposely got a female cat because of that stipulation, even though I had heard that male cats tend to be more cuddly. I didn't want my options severely curtailed more by my having a male cat. It was hard enough finding places that would let me have a pet, then factor in one in which male cats would be okay.

    And no, she can not just sneak a male cat in, saying it's a female. That would break her lease if the owners find out and she'd be forced to move and look for a new place. Most likely at the most inconvenient time for her, like at mid-terms or finals. :headache:
     
  10. kollerbear

    kollerbear Mouseketeer

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    Oh no, I didn't realize she was 18!!! I couldn't imagine having a cat in college for all of the reasons that PPs have posted. If she does decide to go through with it, I BEG of you to make sure she:

    1) Adopts from a no-kill agency that would take the cat back if she ever HAD to get rid of it. At 18, there is NO WAY that you can anticipate the twists and turns that might come at you in life, and even with the best intentions and highest degree of responsibility you might be forced (or feel that you have no choice) but to give up the cat. I am NOT ADVOCATING THAT (please don't flame me!!) but I'm just being realistic and want to make sure the cat she adopts is safe.

    2) Please consider persuading her to get a cat that is old enough to have been well socialized with other cats. If she EVER has to get rid of the cat, cats that were separated from other cats too young often can't live with other cats and it makes them VERY vulnerable in rescue situations. One of our cats is in that situation and she has to be permanently separated from our other cats. It is VERY stressful and she is very lucky she found us, I can't think of many other households that would be willing to make this effort to keep their cat safe. (In fact, we were only "fostering" her but found ourselves completely without options for this EXACT reason.) Many shelters will not let people adopt a single kitten for this exact reason--cats who aren't socialized with other cats are much more vulnerable if you ever have to give them up. Ask the group to recommend a kitten that is old enough to live alone.

    3) Knowing this scenario makes me suggest fostering once again--it's not a lifetime commitment for the animal but she still gets valuable experience and that warm fuzzy feeling of taking care of an animal in need. I would really suggest asking the agency at the pet store if they need foster homes.

    Again, I don't think ANYONE should plan on giving up an animal, but I'm just trying to make sure that the cat is safe for it's whole life. Please bear this in mind!!! I know she wants to adopt and that is admirable, but having an animal is a little like planning a family--it's important to make sure you're ready and you're in as good a position as is reasonable to make a commitment to take care of that animal for its whole life. That's 10-15 years, or more!! She could have this cat until she's 30 or 35, and needs to say that yes, she will make all the accommodations she will need to make for that animal for that WHOLE TIME. That's hard for an 18 year old to imagine. It's really important she thinks about this!!
     
  11. cornflake

    cornflake DIS Veteran

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    As above, at least here, most schools do not allow animals in the dorms at ALL (I actually can't think of one that does). She needs to check on the schools she's thinking of.

    In my experience finding apartments that allow cats isn't that hard. Dogs, yes, can be hard, especially if you have a larger dog but most places will allow a kitty. There are certainly some hard-nosed no-pet places but kitty is pretty easy to find a lease that'll allow.
     
  12. Hannathy

    Hannathy <font color=darkorchid>When I stop laughing I will

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    Generally I would agree with you but apartments around schools that cater to the students tend to not allow animals. At least in my DD's experience and her friends. They are much stricter than your general apartment rules. I would be very hesitant if moving to an apartment close to a college campus.
     
  13. tigercat

    tigercat <font color=magenta>Cook, clean and foot massage.

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    Yes I have thought of that. The reality is though she may end up living here and going to school. There are different one's around us that she would be able to go to. We would take the cat in and look after it until she is home for good, or off to her own apartment. I would not in any circumstances let a cat out to defend itself or just give it to someone else. I think it is terrible of people to do that. I am talking to her about male cats though as she really seems to want a male one. I know this is a big responsiblity on us as well.
    I think this is why I am having an ongoing talk with her and it is good that it is going to take some time before she can actually go get one. Some times it is best not to do things in a hurry but to think first.
    Keep the information coming though because everything people are saying causes some discussion with her and makes her think.
    tigercat
     
  14. Kathryn Merteuil

    Kathryn Merteuil Barden Bella

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    I tried some canned food with my cat today. I got some 9 Lives chicken stuff. She really liked it. She was licking the bowl afterwards. She also managed to keep it down. I was afraid she would gobble it down and then get sick. Thankfully it worked well. I gave her a teaspoon worth. I DID have to call my husband and tell him not to try to make a bbq sandwich out of the stuff in the plastic container in the refrigerator because it was cat food.
     
  15. kollerbear

    kollerbear Mouseketeer

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    Hahaha this had me cracking up!!!

    OP, if you can get a male kitten/juvenile that was neutered before he began spraying (i.e. as long as the cat was not neutered as an adult that was rescued later in his life) the cat is unlikely to develop that behavior after having been neutered. At least I've been told that by a couple sources. Our cat was neutered at about one year and never has sprayed, but I've been told we got a little lucky on that.
     
  16. Hannathy

    Hannathy <font color=darkorchid>When I stop laughing I will

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    Our present cat is a male and he has never sprayed and he was over a year old when he was neutered. He actually was a stray and the vet guessed about a year when we brought him in.
     
  17. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    I do this for my cat every nite. She gets 1 1/2 tablespoons as a treat. (Approximately one fifth of a can.) It lasts almost a whole week that way. :thumbsup2

    She looks forward to it all day. I can even set the clock by her, as she will remind me, to the minute, that it's time for her wet food treat. :cat:


    Too funny! :lmao:

    I got one of those cat food can covers, so it says in the original container. But, I can see, if one isn't used to seeing it in the fridge, it could be mistaken for a can of tuna or chicken or a sandwich spread. :eek:
     
  18. MrsPete

    MrsPete DIS Veteran

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    I also had the impression that the girl was 8-10. Knowing that she's 18, I think she should wait, and my reasoning is much the same as other people's:

    - I know you said she may be living with you, but if there's any chance she may go away to college, she can't take the cat.

    - With college on the horizon, she may well not be able to afford to take care of the cat. Sometimes in college I was literally hungry, literally walked around with holes in the soles of my shoes.

    - For the next four years or so, her life will be very, very busy with school and extra-curricular activities. This is not the time to tie herself down to any domestic activities, including pet ownership.

    I'd suggest that she put her cat ownership dream on hold at least until she's finished a semester or two of college. Find out where she's going to go to school, what type of living arrangements she'll have, how much free time and free money she'll have. Cats will always be available.

    I do understand wanting a cat. When I graduated from college and moved into an apartment, a cat was among my first aquisitions. He lived a good long 13 years, and I loved him very much.
    My daughter is 15 and has been volunteering at a private rescue for some time. Our special ed students at school volunteer at a pet store that keep adoptive cats in the store. You have to look around.
    I've always had my cats (and dogs too) neutered as soon as they were old enough, and I've never had a problem with spraying. If they're neutered before they learn to spray, it won't be a problem.
    Totally agree. At the rescue where my daughter volunteers, there's a sign that reads something like: "I don't want you any more. The most common reason for an animal to be put down."

    Most animals end up in shelters because of people who don't bother to spay /neuter their pets, or people who consider animals semi-disposable. Tired of your puppy? Did your kitten grow out of its cute? Just drop it off at a shelter. Of course, some animals end up there for less cruel reasons: Owners die, are forced to move and can't take the pet to the new place, etc. But if people would just spay /neuter their pets, the problem of unwanted animals would all but disappear.

    Sick cats who come into the rescue are sent to the vet and are put to sleep immediately -- not that one or two might not sneak by, but rescues aren't full of wheezy, runny-eyed cats who are missing clumps of hair. The animals in the rescue are healthy (or, if they are sick, it's something that's not visible to the experienced eye of the rescue workers). When cats come into our rescue, they are kept in a separate area in the back until the vet's looked at them and approved them to mix with the others.
    Yeah, my cats have always thrived on a diet of mostly dry food. In fact, the dry food is better for their teeth -- helps with plaque. You may prefer to feed your cats canned food, but it isn't really a nutritional issue.

    If drinking enough water is an issue, a better option would be buying a cat fountain. Cats are more interested in water and drink more water when it's moving. You can find really nice porcelain fountains on etsy.
     
  19. MrsPete

    MrsPete DIS Veteran

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    Fostering is a great idea. Our rescue can't get enough people to foster cats, and it's so much better for them than living in cages in the rescue. You wouldn't bear the expense of the medical needs (though I think you would provide food and litter yourself), and she'd have no guilt about giving the cat back when she heads off to college.
     
  20. tigercat

    tigercat <font color=magenta>Cook, clean and foot massage.

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    Thought I should add that in her home they have had guinia (sp) pigs who died of old age and they now have a rabbit. She loved the rabbit who really loved to cuddle with her. She has always wanted a kitten but her mum is allergic to cats. Since she is no longer there it isn't a problem and for some reason my husband has agreed to it. He doesn't mind animals it was just we had the kids and he thought it was just another thing to look after. He is really mellowing in his old age.
    tigercat
     
  21. lesroi

    lesroi <font color=green>Glad to see it is up and running

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    My "pound kitty" lived for over 18 years and never had a piece of wet food in her life. She never had a UT blockage. Cats do not need wet food and in fact eating the dry cuts down on the plaque on their teeth.

    Tracy
     

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