How about a TS Restraunt in American Adventure that actualy represents U.S. foods

Discussion in 'Disney Restaurants' started by stoudt6, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. stoudt6

    stoudt6 Mouseketeer

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    I know Hot dogs and Hamburgers are as American as it gets, but think its disapointing that the U.S.A. isn't truly represented in its Area. How about a place that serves all the great regional favorites. I'm talking foods like Maryland Crab Cakes, PA Dutch Foods, Chicago style pizza, Southern B-BQ, Fish from the Northwest, and many other great foods.
     
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  3. 6disneykids

    6disneykids Mouseketeer

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    Sound great in theory, but I don't think this could happen in practice. There would be tons of people who would say this isn't REAL____(add regional dish here). Then there would be the discussion of why something was left off or done poorly.
     
  4. davedmaine

    davedmaine DIS Veteran

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    I guess you could say that about every country in Epcot..
     
  5. minnie mum

    minnie mum Unapologetic Disney Fan(atic)

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    You don't really want them inserting a TS restaurant inside the American Adventure attraction do you? Wouldn't you really prefer that they add this restaurant elsewhere in the American Pavillion?
     
  6. chartle

    chartle DIS Veteran

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    This is exactly what happened last time this was brought up.

    Wait, I know, what about American BBQ. :thumbsup2 :stir:
     
  7. chartle

    chartle DIS Veteran

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    Yes but most people here don't know what that is or if they are missing something.
     
  8. TheRustyScupper

    TheRustyScupper Common sense is so rare, should be a Super Power.

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    Sounds good, but those above food origins are not USA . . .
    . . . Crab Cakes - Russian
    . . . PA Dutch Foods - German
    . . . Chicago Style Pizza - Sicilian
    . . . Fish From Northwest - Canadian
    . . . Southern BBQ - Caribbean

    PS - Hot dogs and hamburgers are not of American origin, either.
     
  9. nessz79

    nessz79 DIS Veteran

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    Maybe they could have another steak house to compete with Le Cellier? I think a TS of contemporary American food is a great idea.
     
  10. chartle

    chartle DIS Veteran

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    1. Never heard of that
    2. Once they got the US I do think it changed a bit
    3. I'm not from Chicago, but Deep Dish Chicago Style is not any thick crust American Sicilian pizza I that I know of. Though according to Wikipedia there are at least 4 styles of Sicilian pizza. One like we know of and 3 others that don't look like Deep Dish. They also point out that Chicago Style was developed in Chicago.
    4. OK
    5. Now this is where it can get heated

    • Beef or Pork or Chicken (Chicken who said chicken pirate:)
    • Sauce while cooking or no sauce but rub or Sauce at the table
    • Tomato based BBQ sauce or mustard based
    • then of course you get into the right wood
    • it just goes on from there pirate:.

    6. yep for it truly to be American you get cranberries, wild rice and turkey maybe potatoes.
     
  11. kris4360

    kris4360 DIS Veteran

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    And a miller lite to wash it down
     
  12. Aura of Foreboding

    Aura of Foreboding Mouseketeer

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    The only way to do "true" American food would be things like pemmican, beans, squash, corn, etc...
     
  13. tarheelmjfan

    tarheelmjfan <font color=red>Proud Redhead<br><font color=blue>

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    I would also like to see a nice restaurant serving regional, American food. It doesn't have to be of American origin. After all, many WDW visitors are American, but our ancestors came here from another country. That doesn't make us less American. Unfortunately, I don't think that will ever happen. People have asked for a TS there for years. They sell too many subpar hamburgers & hotdogs to close the CS location. If they did, there would be many protesting that they couldn't get normal CS food in WS. :rolleyes: I don't know how much land is available for expansion, but it may happen someday, if they could keep the CS & open a TS restaurant.

    PS: OP, I think we all knew you were referring to the American Pavilion not the attraction.
     
  14. Mickey'sApprentice

    Mickey'sApprentice Shamelessly demand, it works bette

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    True American food would be: okra, squash, turnip greens, corn bread, pork chops, and corn on the cob with a tall glass of iced tea.

    As for BBQ, I saw something on the travel channel that said that the Indians developed the slow cooking method and that Europeans introduced the pig to it. The same man that said that also said that South Carolina is the birth place of bbq for that reason. (I have no idea.)

    As for the person who spoke of Tomato based and Mustard based bbq sauce...yes, I've tried those. In Alabama, we introduced the mayonnaise based bbq sauce. Yumm!

    I prefer both the tomato and mayonnaise based sauces to the mustard sauces.
     
  15. TheRustyScupper

    TheRustyScupper Common sense is so rare, should be a Super Power.

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    Barbecue derives from the word barabicu found in the language
    of the Taíno people of the Caribbean, translated it means Sacred
    Fire Pit. (At least according to Altron Brown)
     
  16. Mickey'sApprentice

    Mickey'sApprentice Shamelessly demand, it works bette

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    I had some BBQ a couple of days ago that I could have swore came from a sacred fire pit. And no...it wasn't at Disney.
     
  17. bytheblood

    bytheblood Guest

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    :thumbsup2
     
  18. bytheblood

    bytheblood Guest

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    :thumbsup2


    Some people just have to pick everything apart. ;)
     
  19. stoudt6

    stoudt6 Mouseketeer

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    Guess I really worded my original post badly. I understand that most foods didn't originate in the U.S.A., but that doesn't mean we aren't known for them. Just saying I think our Country should be represented better then Hot Dogs and Hamburgers at a CS.
     
  20. si-am

    si-am DIS Veteran

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    I always thought it would be cool if they kept the CS, but made it more like a food court with different counters for different regions. You could have pizza, Southwest, Southern, a generic hamburgers/hot dogs, Northeast (seafood) etc.
     
  21. JennaDeeDooDah

    JennaDeeDooDah My oh my what a wonderful day!

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    Shoot, there are plenty of American foods that could be in a food court or in a table service restaurant. Let's see, the lobster roll originated in Connecticut (that's right, not in Mass.), the Philly Cheesesteak originated in (shocker here) Philadelphia, and as if the cheeseseteak isn't enough to thank Pennsylvania for, they also gave us the banana split. And let's not forget foods of the south! The yummy chicken fried steak of the south, gumbo, shrimp and grits are all foods native to the south. God bless Texas, we invented the corn dog! Buffalo wings were invented in Buffalo. Baked Alaska, anyone? The Reuben was invented in America, as well. It can be misleading with its Swiss cheese (not really from Switzerland) and Russian dressing (nope, not from Russia), but it originated here in The Home of the Brave. Our American Indians were also the first ones to ever use maple syrup. Want something a little lighter? The Cobb Salad is also native to The United States.
     

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