Has anyone ever complained about your kids at the parks?

Discussion in 'Theme Parks Attractions and Strategies' started by aristocatz, Sep 6, 2010.

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  1. minniebride

    minniebride DIS Veteran

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    Great post!!!:thumbsup2
     
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  3. j&j620

    j&j620 DIS Veteran

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    Well, that's exactly what a young child would think. Try Googling "Egocentrism" and "Piaget." Interesting stuff.
     
  4. stepdisney

    stepdisney <font color=red>Jambo Wildbunch Gang<br><font colo

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    Interesting thread. I was at MK last week in the Laugh show with Mike W. The woman behind me had a child who was crying loudly throughout the show. She also had a little one (maybe 2) who was running back and forth. She kept saying "do you want to leave?" She was also loud. She stood up holding the baby who was crying and kept saying "do you want to leave or see the rest of the show. She BECAME the show. My question, why wouldn't you leave if your children were crying or screaming during a show? If you are in a show and your child has a melt down, to answer the OP, yes, I think you should leave, I should leave, whomever should grab the child quickly and head to the nearest door to quiet the child. Of course those of us with children know to have treats, cool drinks, etc. handy when you feel one coming on. If you can't stop it, move the child to another location and handle your business like a parent. Ignoring it when you are walking through the park pushing the stroller is understandable, (IMHO) but you shouldn't ignore it if everyone is watching a show. JMHO
     
  5. minniebride

    minniebride DIS Veteran

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    I have to agree here. I am actually a behavior specialist for young children with autism and behavioral disorders. I've worked with a wide variety of kids in their schools, in their homes, and in the community for over 13 years-working directly with children, training parents, and training teachers. I feel pretty confident that, not only can I offer advice about managing a child's behaviors, I can offer them without parental emotions getting in the way. & I can tell you what the research says, with regards to what generally works/does not work. Not trying to sound arrogant, I'm just saying that you don't need to have children to understand behavior management.

    So, just because you don't have children, it doesn't necessarily mean you don't know how to manage behaviors. Don't forget that many people on here, aside from being WDW fanatics, are professionals in various fields, some in the area of child behavior management! :)
     
  6. Withacy

    Withacy DIS Veteran

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    So basically you're going to punish everyone else around you? I'm all for teaching your child a lesson, but if your priority was teaching her a lesson about consiquences wouldn't "You chose to wear this dress, now you don't want to - so we'll go back and change, but that will make you miss lunch with the princesses" be a valid one too? But that would inconvenience you. So you chose the consiquence that just happened to work out best for you.

    I actually had a similar situation arise with an itchy pirate costume & a 7 year old at the Magic Kingdom. When he started whining, before it escallated, I sat him down, looked him in the eye and said "What do you want to do?" He was kind of surprised by that (I'm his godmother - I don't know how his mother deals with those situations). "If you don't want to wear it, we'll leave the park, go back to the hotel and you can change." HE decided to stay, and that was pretty much the end of it. Though I did end up carrying all the parts that were removable. pirate:
     
  7. churchpilot

    churchpilot I never look back, Dahling, it distracts from the

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    Two different experiences stand out....Buzz Lightyear this past April---a young boy (7-8) and his mom were in line and she was pulling him along by his arm. He would pull against her, but not say anything. I thought this was odd, but upon reflection, I do believe he probably had some sort of sensory issues, etc. All of a sudden he yanked loose and tried to run off. She grabbed him and took him to the ground to try and control him. We were all a little shocked and not sure what to do. All of a sudden he got up and took off running. He whizzed right past us and the mom screamed his name over and over (he was headed out, not toward the ride). She was having a harder time getting by people and catching up with him and her face was loaded with fear, despair, etc. My husband took off after him at that point and the mom just crumpled to the ground and started crying and saying "I can't do it anymore....." It was so sad and more than a few of us were crying and hurting for her. My husband did catch up to him and got him in a bear hug and finally managed to call me and ask what to do next. We told mom that my husband had her son and she got up and apologized, said "thank you" and I walked out with her. They were reunited and everything seemed to be okay at that point. The other one.................happened in May. A little boy who looked to be about 3 nutted up on his parents outside POTC and started kicking, hitting, pinching, and screaming at his mom and dad. I couldn't understand him (he was Asian) but you knew he was mad. They both spoke to him in calm voices and tried to placate him. Not working. Then he made a mistake---spit in his mothers face and then spit at his Dad but hit our stroller instead. My husband's turn to nut up!!!!!!!!!!!!!! He bent down and put his finger in the little angels face and did his deepest, meanest man voice and said "no". You would have thought he poured ice water on the little tot. He turned beet red and ran to mom and started wailing. My husband walked over to the mom, bent down again and repeated "no, and said stop". He did...........poor kid---with passive parents like that you wonder if he won't turn out to be the most disliked child on the planet.
     
  8. luckyprincess

    luckyprincess Dis Lord

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    :thumbsup2Thank you! My mother always said in response to how difficult it is to raise kids: 'it's not rocket science, you just need common sense and love'. Of course those were the days before parenting books, validating tantrums and negotiating good behavior :rolleyes1 :rotfl:

    I've experience with little ones, tweens and teens and of course there are blips in behavior - it's how you respond to that which matters. Some people just get defensive about any advice at all and make up reasons why not to take it, I think :confused3
     
  9. NLD

    NLD DIS Veteran

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    Ummmm, no. As I said we were not in the queue while she was being bothersome. So yes, we took other people into account.

    However I don't see how it's "punishing everyone else" to pull her to the side until she calmed down. And that is my point exactly. It seems like some people have this unreasonable expectation that they won't ever have to hear a crying kid in the parks. We were not in a show, we were not in line. But what I gather from some of these posts is that I should have removed my crying child from Epcot altogether. Now how does that work? If I bring my screaming child on the bus to go back to the resort because that is what some people think is the appropriate consequence for having a tantrum in public, am I not inconveniencing the people on the bus now?

    We tried the whole "What do you want to do?" question. She was in that stage where anything we said made her more mad and made her louder. I know my child and I know that at that point, I have to give her space to calm herself down. So that is what we did--not in a show, not in a line, not in close quarters to others where they couldn't get away from us--but yes, in the park.

    Once she calmed herself down I again asked what she wanted to do. By that point she was calmer but still pouty and refusing to answer, so she was told to think about it and she could tell us after Soarin'. (She was quiet by that point so we entered the queue.) After Soarin' she perked up and was happy again and decided she did not need new clothes and could live with her dress until after lunch, and we had a wonderful rest of the day with no more incidents.

    So all of that to say is... sometimes parents DO know their kids best and DO know how to handle a situation, and just because a kid is screaming in the parks doesn't mean the automatic answer is to remove them completely from the park. It's a judgment call.

    I understand what everyone is saying about parents who literally WATCH their kids do naughty things to other people (like kicking the back of someone's seat) without doing anything. That bugs me too, and I would not allow DD to do something like that! But I'm also sayingthat just because a kid is crying and the parents appear to be "ignoring" it doesn't mean they've necessarily "taken a vacation from parenting." :)
     
  10. Suellen

    Suellen DIS Veteran

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    Ahhhhh I'd be hard pressed to sit by and let your husband talk to my children in an disciple type manner.

    To those that don't have kids but know a lot about it. It is totally different when you are the one responsible for them for 24/7 365. I'd be the best parent in the world if I only had to spend 6 hours a day with my kids.

    But get woken up 5 times a night, still be up at 7AM with them, wash them, clothe them, feed them, entertain them, teach them, discipline them for 24 hours a day 7 days a week in "real" life (i.e. not on vacation) and then you can tell me what I am doing wrong with my kids. As a matter of fact that isn't necessarily true because you would have to do all those things for my specific kids before you can have an opinion on them. Every kid kid is different.

    Not every parent is perfect. Not every parent is the same. Not every technique works for every kid. As has been proven in this thread you have NO IDEA what other issues a child may have.

    I have a 5 year old with OCD ~ so what you "may" see as a bad behavior tantrum may in fact be a panic attack that could last hours or could last 5 seconds.

    So the best advice you can give a parent is: know your own kids and what they can and can't handle. Beyond that ~ your really have no idea.
     
  11. tink20

    tink20 DIS Veteran

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    I don't think they have ever bothered anyone else, if they did, then I apologize. But they sure have gotten of my nerves a few times. I usually try to be more patient when we are on vacation, but I will give an evil look or with DD, I would start correcting her loudly (which would embarrass her) but that was when she was like 12/13, she is fine now.

    DS was whiny on our first trip, I would just remove him from the area, and go talk to him in private. He was scared to go on the rides. I would try to talk him into going, and if he didn't want to, then DH and I would take turns with DD.

    Now, last summer (June 09) We brought DD's two friends (all three were 15 yrs. old) with us, and they would eat lots of sweets at the dinner buffets, and they were hopped up on sugar, they were laughing (one of the girls laughed so hard, she started coughing and gagging) and being very loud and talking to total strangers. I did tell them to settle down, but DH said that one of the girls was almost embarrassing him. They did this like the last 3 nights of the trip. They were just excited and having fun, it was their first time at WDW. I am sure they were bothering someone, but noone ever said anything to them.......but sorry if you were on the monorail that night when they were acting CrAzY!
     
  12. luckyprincess

    luckyprincess Dis Lord

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    Lol!!!:rotfl: My bf and I would burst out laughing if she did that to us!:goodvibes
     
  13. Azree

    Azree Mouseketeer

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    I'm sorry, it seems like most of you have let this one go, but I just can't. I feel the overwhelming need to paraphrase this post - here goes:

    "I don't have kids, and don't want any, but I WILL tell you how to properly parent the ones YOU have."

    That about right?



    Further...

    1. Disney is a place for children of all ages. Therefore, you will encounter many of them while touring the parks.

    2. Children (of all ages) behave in VASTLY different ways, from one child to the next, and from one moment to the next.

    3. Parents discipline and handle their children in VASTLY different ways, from one child to the next, and from one moment to the next.

    4. As long as there are no signs of abuse, it is NOT YOUR PLACE to tell another parent how to discipline their children.

    5. Is it rude to allow children to bother other park guests? Absolutely. But is it just as rude to interfere with/scold/comment to a parent who is dealing with (or not dealing with) their own children? Absolutely.

    I know enough about my kids and they know enough about my expectations that I will remove them from public situations in which they act inappropriately. But other people to not handle their kids the same way, and I would never presume to know what's best for their families.


    As parents, I am sure most here would agree that we have dealt with many, many stressful parenting situations, including those in which we are not particularly proud of our responses.

    To assume that we are not handling our children "correctly" or up to your expectations is unfair and presumptuous.

    Last visit, I sat with my kids in the back row of a boat on Splash Mountain and watched the single mother of four (ages around 5 to 10-11) in front of us beg, plead, holler, and cry to her children to sit down and behave on the ride. She was at her wit's end, and, while I initially thought some pretty ugly thoughts, by the end of the 10 minute ride I had been reminded well enough that her job is tough enough without some random stranger looking down his nose at her and jumping to conclusions. For her, this may have been the trip of a lifetime and she was trying to hold together the crumbling remnants of her dream vacation. Fact is, it wasn't my place to judge. That's somebody else's job. [/rant]


    Sorry if this post comes off as rude - I'm trying to be as gentle as possible and get my point across.
     
  14. Planogirl

    Planogirl I feel the nerd in me stirring

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    I think that people without kids have the right to say something here. They aren't parents of course but they can sure be inconvenienced by people refusing to parent. While we may not know the full story when we see a kid acting up we can often tell when the parents aren't doing what they're supposed to.
     
  15. fairestoneofall

    fairestoneofall DIS Veteran

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    nobody said that. i believe what has been said is that, if you are not a parent, do not tell someone who IS a parent HOW to parent. because you just don't know until you've walked in the same shoes.

    i AM a parent, but i would not ever tell someone else how to parent. their kids might do better with a different form of discipline than what works for my kids. heck. my kids don't respond the same way to the same discipline. DD is more headstrong and stubborn. with DS, sometimes a stern look is all it takes to get him to straighten up. sometimes, it takes more. all that to say that each child is different. and you cannot look at a child you aren't around all the time and make the judgement call on what type of discipline will work.

    the title of this thread is, "Has anyone ever complained about your kids at the parks?" i don't know why that has opened up for everyone to start judging everyone else's parenting styles. but i guess this is the Dis. ;)
     
  16. CTDisneyfan816

    CTDisneyfan816 DIS Veteran

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    I have no kids, but I was one once and I have been around friends with kids a lot so just because I don't have kids doesn't mean my opinion on kids is any less valid. That being said I would never tell or even suggest to someone how to raise their kid. That being said when I go out in public, whether it be to a restaurant or in this case to Disney, there are going to be children. And more times than not there will be crying babies/children. Misbehaving children, downright loud and unruly children. If you can accept that fact, that's half the battle. And ask yourself a question, do you think the kids parents hate hearing the noise any less than you do? Sometimes the worst thing you can do is to address the child because that is exactly what they are looking for. If the know that all they need to do to make the parent drop everything they are doing to focus 100% of their attention on them is to cry or misbehave, guess what? They cry and misbehave! I have yet to have an outing ruined by a child misbehaving (and believe me, I've been around more than my share). Kids all have to learn and that is part of that experience.

    As for apologizing, no need to.
     
  17. luckyprincess

    luckyprincess Dis Lord

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    Me too.
     
  18. churchpilot

    churchpilot I never look back, Dahling, it distracts from the

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    "Ahhhhh I'd be hard pressed to sit by and let your husband talk to my children in an disciple type manner."

    Your child spits on our stroller after terrorizing you and your husband, I can assure you my husband will have something to say about it. He did make eye contact with both parents after the incident and they refused to acknowledge it happened, and since we were still within firing range, he nipped it in the bud. Dealing with parental fallout at that point was the least of our worries!
     
  19. JenM

    JenM DIS Veteran

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    My friend's kids broke out into a fistfight over an autograph book in front of Snow White at Magic Kingdom a few years back. Once she settled them down, she apologized to Snow White and said "You live with seven men, so you understand, right?" :rotfl:
     
  20. Suellen

    Suellen DIS Veteran

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    Then he can deal with me and NOT intimidate my child or point his finger in her face. And trust me if he does get all up in my childs face he will be dealing with me.

    Totally INAPPROPRIATE!

    I'm sure your stroller and day was just completely ruined. :rolleyes:
     
  21. LilyWDW

    LilyWDW Going to My Happy Place

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    Okay, that is out of line and ridicules. Just because someone does not want children does not mean they will end up with a house full of cats. It doesn't mean they will have less of a life. It is their personal wants for their lives. You don't know why someone doesn't want kids, so get your nose out of their business about it.

    And luckyprincess is a wonderful and sweet person. However, like many other people, she has an opinion. Obviously her opinion is not the same as yours and, as it happens WAY too much around here, that means she's a horrible person.

    Well guess what? Just because someone thinks differently then you doesn't make them a bad person.
     
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