Gas on it's way up in price again today?

Discussion in 'Budget Board' started by nbodyhome, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. nbodyhome

    nbodyhome DIS Veteran

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    I saw on Fark just before I went to bed that BP in Alaska just ended up shutting down one of it's fields (8% of US production) and read this morning that the barrel of oil is over $76 now.

    I was really looking forward to prices going down again, not up!
     
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  3. tinker&belle

    tinker&belle DIS Veteran

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    I saw the story too. They always seem to have a new reason to gouge us lately...I don't ever see it going down, they used the TS Chris for their last gouge and that never even came to be...they still haven't brought it down from that one.
     
  4. disneysnowflake

    disneysnowflake DIS Veteran

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    Hey, in my area it was $2.95, then it was up to $2.99 with the TS Chris gouge.
    Then they did us a favor and dropped it 1 cent. Now it's $2.98, even though it's still 3 cents higher then before they gouged us. Sigh.

    Heck, if someone sneezes they use that as a reason to up prices.
     
  5. nbodyhome

    nbodyhome DIS Veteran

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    It had started on it's way down a bit a couple of times, I never expect it to be what it was a couple of years ago - but $2.50 would be nice at this point.

    I don't know if they are permanently closing the field, but I don't know why they've not kept it up (they make enough money!!!)

    Gas here has been about $2.89, give or take a few pennies. Well, not take a few - $2.89 and up.
     
  6. petrymom

    petrymom DIS Veteran

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    AAAWWWHHHHH!!!!! I already hate going to the gas station - $3.12/gallon here (been this way for a while) :furious:
     
  7. CarolA

    CarolA <a href="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/index.

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    The field closure is temporary, but will increase our imports of oil products.

    I am of two minds about gas prices. I know that the increase hurts those who can least afford it. I also think that we have made our own mess. The US has never properly invested in urban transit etc. so we are way too dependent on the personal car and of course we ALL NEED an SUV. (And before you give me the "snow" and "Safety" arguments, I drive a SAAB I was in an accident where the cops thought I should have had life threatening injuires based on the state of my car, It did what it should and I didn't have scratch or a bruise. The woman in the SUV who hit me was taken in my ambulance to the hospital. The SAAB also zipped right past an SUV on a snowy mountain...SO I don't buy the SUV aruguments that you HAVE to have them to get around. You may need a bigger car based on your family size, but that's a totally different line of thinking)

    At the rate we are going our kids are going to be in big trouble unless we find another way to get around.
     
  8. MrsPete

    MrsPete DIS Veteran

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    I agree. The concept of everyone owning a personal car is not workable on several levels: it adds huge strain to a family's budget, it depletes our natural resources, and the ease of transportation decreases our exercise.

    The problem is that we -- generic we -- have decided to shun the few mass transit options available to us. Riding the city bus seems to be a sign that you're poor. Even school kids quit riding the school bus when they turn 16 and can drive; and a huge number of kids never even ride the bus -- they're picked up everyday of their school lives. I would like to see the government invest in good, convenient mass transit, and make it attractive enough that the average person will use it. That's our long-term, quit-worrying-about-the-price-of-gas-forever solution.
     
  9. CarolA

    CarolA <a href="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/index.

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    You have a point. Until recently I was the only person in my immediate work group who took the local subway (light rail) system to work. A few others have joined me due to gas prices, but our Admin Asst spends half her time complaining about the cost of gas and parking. SHe lives where I do so the subway is a great alternative. Nope, won't work, she NEEDS to drive home at lunch to play with her dog. (A whole different issue that is one of the reasons she is on an action plan ...It takes MORE then an hour to do this)
     
  10. mjbaby

    mjbaby DIS Veteran

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    It's an act of courage these days to point out that we made the bed in which we are currently lying, and I appreciate you saying it.
     
  11. nbodyhome

    nbodyhome DIS Veteran

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    When I visit my dad in DC, I always use the metro myself to get around - the buses there are pretty good too. I do wish we had a metro/train system like Europe does - you can get almost anywhere without a car there (and the trains are MUCH nicer than Amtrak!)
     
  12. dvcgirl

    dvcgirl DIS Veteran

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    We're already in trouble....and we're going to feel the pain for some time to come. And, it will get much worse before things can get better. Gas prices aren't going down....they are forecast to stay up through 2007. Peak oil, and stories about the coming oil crisis used to be sort of "out there"....the mainstream considered talk of the world's oil production peaking to be a crazy fringe theory. Not anymore....it's everywhere. Mainstream thinkers are now coming out and saying some frightening things. Bill Clinton said recedntly in a speech in Ireland that he believes that we'll see $100 a barrel oil within five years. I think we'll see it way before then...

    I recently read an excellent four part series in the Chicago Tribune called "A World of Gas, A Tank of Trouble". (link below) The report centers around a new gas station/convenience store in South Elgin Illinois where this reporter actually worked for a number of months. For the first time, this reporter was allowed to track the crude oil that ended up in that tank in South Elgin, and then he traveled to those parts of the world to see where our oil comes from. What he found is really eye opening. Our dependency on oil, the increasing demand, and the fact that some of our oil comes from very troubled and dangerous parts of the world....well, it's quite disturbing.

    We're entering a new time in this world....the end of cheap oil. One of the reasons we've been so lazy in developing alternative fuels is that oil was always so cheap by comparison. And the net energy gain in drilling for oil was positive. Many of the alternative fuels, or ways of getting oil use up a ton of energy. Ethanol has a negative net gain right now. Oil sands....very expensive to mine for it, and it's causing havoc to the Canadian landscape, hydrogen.....very expensive.

    We're dangerously close to hitting that point where our demand for oil will be greater than our ability to supply it....some think within a few years if China and India keep growing so rapidly. As it is, supply and demand are so close right now that any little problem....whether it be rebels in Nigeria blowing up pipelines, Hurricane Whoever, Iraq Civil War, Iranian threats to slow production, Venezeualan threats to shunt supply away from the US......well, it will continue to drive the price up.

    Ironically, the only thing that will bring the price down would be a worldwide recession. And honestly, that's probably not a good thing because it will lull us all back into a false sense of security and just prolong the enivitable(for the short term anyway).

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/specials/broadband/chi-oilsafari-html,0,7894741.htmlstory
     
  13. krdisneybound

    krdisneybound <br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/i

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    Went out yesterday and saw that gas was $3.18 at two different stations. And that was regular

    YIKES ---------------
     
  14. dvcgirl

    dvcgirl DIS Veteran

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    Well, the oil companies can't schedule a heck of a lot of maintenance time in as they need to be pumping nearly 24/7 to keep up with demand. As it is, they do put millions of gallons of corrosives inhibitors into those pipes, but what this really shows us is how old much of this infrastructure is.....yet, another problem in this industry.

    Bush is going to release some crude from the Strategic Petroleum Reserves on this to calm the markets. Still, all this points to is that any little interruption in the flow of oil...(and this one is not so little) will drive the price up.
     
  15. ameraumi

    ameraumi DIS Veteran

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    But that is not always true. My city does not have a good bus system and certain areas of town go without service. It's hard to use the bus when it is not available to you.

    I'm almost to the point where I want to trade in my good mileage mini van (Honda) for an Accord or Civic to get even better mileage.

    Gas did go down in a bit yesterday here, but I am sure it will be right back up this afternoon.
     
  16. dawnball

    dawnball <font color=red>bouncie bouncie...<br><font color=

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    My DH has started taking the bus to work 4 days a week, because it saves us around $12/day for him to take the bus. He's usually one of about 4 people on the bus. On a really good day there might be 6 people on the bus. Until more people ride the bus it isn't really a gas savings, but it is a financial savings for our family.

    I would love to take the bus for errands, but there just isn't enough demand for daytime bus service here. If I cycle for a few miles I can catch a bus with an hourly loop that will take me to shopping - but an hourly loop makes multiple stops (say Target and a grocery store) fairly unreasonable.

    However - we're currently renting and will probably be househunting in another year or so depending on real estate prices. Being close to a bus route and bicycle routes or greenways has become a requirement for our new house. Our goal is to have a single car (instead of 2) and to drive <100 miles/week on average.
     
  17. mking624

    mking624 DIS Veteran

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    Last week here it was $2.89 a gallon (regular)...then the next day it jumped to $3.18...and today it's $3.21.
     
  18. Mad4Dizne

    Mad4Dizne DIS Veteran

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    and utilize more ecofriendly alternatives, but really--does the oil companies need the billions and billions of $$$$of profit??? I don't think it fair to rake consumers over the coals, because they can....I saw a recent news report on a few Texas towns where they can't stock enough luxury cars due to the $$$ being made by the increase in gas prices--not right, as the consumers are financing this!!!
     
  19. MrsPete

    MrsPete DIS Veteran

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    What I really meant was that we as a society have not made the choice to invest in good public transportation. Obviously you can't ride what doesn't exist in your town, so you're forced to use your own car. I was looking at society's choices, not any individual's.

    Let me say it again, differently: Americans have always valued individuality and personal freedom. Nothing has embodied that ideal more than the car. It gives a person the ability to go where he wants, when he wants -- no waiting, no one else controlling his options, no inconvenience -- he can just go. People also use their cars as an expression of who they are: sporty, red convertibles; safe, stable minivans. This love of cars and freedom has led us to look down upon public transportation as "second class". Ride the bus? Adhere to someone else's schedule? Share my space? All too many people say, "I don't think so". And one of the biggest rites-of-passage in American society is turning 16 and getting one's driver's license. Kids ride busses, adults drive cars. Cars are more than just transportation to us -- we as a society are emotionally attached to them.

    Oh, there are exceptions: someone else mentioned the Metro in DC -- that's an excellent system, and if I lived there, I would use it regularly. But notice . . . these good public transportation systems have grown up OUT OF NECESSITY. The big cities who have these good transportation systems literally could not support the cars that would be necessary to transport everyone. And since everyone in those areas needs that transportation, people there have developed a more healthy attitude towards public transportation. The rest of us could do the same.

    Admittedly, the Europeans have a leg-up on us in that their countries are smaller and people live much closer together. America's much, much, much bigger; thus, the transportation problem is much bigger.

    I don't think we as a society can afford to continue our love affair with the personal car. It's too expensive on several fronts. It seems obvious to me that we must invest in better public transportation so that people like you, ameraumi, will have choices.

    We also need to monitor our usage better. We have reached the point that we're rather spoiled in America today: We run out to the grocery store to pick up on thing, we drive to dinner, we pick the kids up at school. We individuals cannot build mass transit systems, but we can rethink the usage of our own cars. We can plan our errands so that we use our resources to the best advantage.
     
  20. MrsPete

    MrsPete DIS Veteran

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    I don't disagree with you -- I do think the oil companies are taking unfair advantage of the consumers; however, I don't think that's the main focus. This problem is environmental as well as economic. As long as gas prices don't hurt too much, we as a society aren't going to make the changes that are necessary for our future.
     
  21. deltachi8

    deltachi8 Smells of rich mahogany

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    A corroded pipeline is nota "made up" reason, it exists. It's real and effects supply.

    Supply and demand determine the market price for oil. While pressures have been put on the supply side with refinery capacity, international strife, delivery interruption, demand has not gone down at all...in fact, it continues to grow. Therefore, higher prices.

    Oil company profits are a nice story to make people direct their anger, but the real story is that without changes in habbits, there is no reason for oil prices to come down Actually, IMHO, his is a good thing in the long run - it is now economically viable for companies to invest in alternative technologies and sources of energy. Why would anyone invest in those technologies when the world has ignored them for cheap oil?

    Why would cities invest in terrifically planned and accessible public transportation when it would be ignored by the public in favor of cheap oil? When popele step back for a moment from today's pain, they will seethat in the long run, we may benefit from this...new technology, less reliance on foreign oil, better public transportation....

    I dont understand the uproar over an oil company's profits going up 17% when, at the same time, local company XYZ reports profits up 17% they are praised for dooing good business.
     

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