First School IEP Meeting for Son; UPDATE post 19

Discussion in 'disABILITIES Community Board' started by KandiB47, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. HopperFan

    HopperFan "It's a bug-eat-bug world out there, princess."

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    Long story short as we have done IEPs since birth, we had about 4-5 years of unpleasant experiences. I used to handle all this alone and found when things got tough the school began filling their side of the table with more administrators and coordinators to intimidate me.

    My response was to bring my DH wearing a suit and tie. I had completely briefed him on everything and everyone so we were prepared to tag team. The results I had by having a "team" there that was professional and prepared made a huge difference. The first time he walked in they were shocked and completely changed how they spoke to me. (I purposely did not tell them he was coming.) Your doctor diagnosis should get your meeting and from the sounds of it your SE Coordinator (I've had two bad ones and had both removed by Principals from my DS case with notation they were to have no interaction with him) will not be happy. I understand not wanting to make them mad. Maybe start with the first meeting with Dad. Know before going what your expectations are the services you and the doctor think are needed. If they still refuse then I would be contacting an advocate.

    I went through bad times the end of elementary and beginning of middle school. It can be scary but if you don't fight for them, no one else will. Once we were in high school, medical situation changed, world upside down but the teachers, SE coordinator and everyone at that level were awesome. Stay calm; Keep all your notes, their notes, letters, data etc; Don't sign if you don't agree; If changes are made to forms and you sign, get a new copy of that right there because, as I learned, getting later can be impossible; Thank and praise all who help to reinforce your positive energy; and if you have a person who is working against you do not converse with them without a witness (Dad or Advocate or Friend) and communicate everything in writing.

    GOOD LUCK :grouphug:
     
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  3. mcraft17

    mcraft17 DIS Veteran

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    I had the same issue with my dd. Because academically she wasn't struggling that much (the higher the grade she did start having some trouble) they said she didn't need an iep and would not offer any help. That was in 2nd grade and it wasn't until her counselor at a new school in 4th grade suggested Asperger's that it all made sense. We had her tested and sure enough she was diagnosed with Asperger's. And is now a senior in high school and has had an iep since 4th. She has improved a lot with services, but I wish that I had known sooner. We knew she was different and had some difficulties but back then she was diagnosed with a bunch of other things that never really fit. So I am very glad that you got a diagnosis and are on the right track to making sure your child receive services that will help. As someone who is at the end of the iep journey to someone just beginning, never stop pushing and always ask. Because they are not required to tell you every service that they have or can offer. Which is sad because I know of many students who could have benefited from certain things but they were never asked for. Good luck and if you ever have any questions or need any tips don't hesitate to pm me.
     
  4. bookwormde

    bookwormde <font color=darkorchid>Heading out now, another ad

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    Yes get a volunteer advocate experienced in HFA/Asperger's to assist you.

    You can contact your state IDEA parent training center or autism advocacy groups.

    You might also want to contact your state PTA special needs committee, to let them know the issues you are having since they can advocate more broadly for systemic changes and compliance.

    If you have not read it already get a copy of Tony Attwood's "the complete guide to Aspergers"

    I also want to say congratulations, since along with the challenges of ASD come amazing gifts that if supported have the potential to positively impact the world well beyond average.

     
  5. scooffer

    scooffer Mouseketeer

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    Just wanted to say "I understand" to you... we are in the same boat right now with our DS7 who was diagnosed on the spectrum but high functioning in December. I insisted on evals from the school at the PRE-IEP meeting, and we are waiting those results in 3 weeks... its so hard to have to advocate as a parent and still be understanding as to not burn bridges at the school. Its obvious to me and his teacher that he flourishes with an aide one on one, but suffers if asked to do independent work. But, we have to work the system and pray for the best. Although ASD is on the "list" its not a golden ticket for services, schools just don't know how to handle these high functioning kids.

    "Education" is not just academics. See what your states definition of Education is... you will see there is much more than just grades!

    Good luck!
     
  6. Gracie09

    Gracie09 DIS Veteran

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    Did your school do any testing at all? To get an iep army dd's school they had to go through a battery of tests from IQ to pt/ot and speech as well as complete scial and medical histories from me. We are provides with all the test results not just the averages. The key is in the subtests.

    If you haven't request in writing that he be given a complete test and the results shared with you at least ten days prior to any meeting. Also google wrights law. It's an extremely informative website. If he happens to be speaking in your area it is well worth the money to see him
     
  7. huey duey & luey

    huey duey & luey <font color=CC33CC>DIS Veteran<br><font color=0099

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  8. huey duey & luey

    huey duey & luey <font color=CC33CC>DIS Veteran<br><font color=0099

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    sensory processing disorder doesn't always impact academic functioning. I have treated many children with SID who are flourishing academically. That is not saying there aren't issues that necessitate OT within the school setting.
     
  9. LuvGoofy6

    LuvGoofy6 "This bond between us can't be broken. I will be

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    As a special education teacher I can honestly tell you that there are students that we test and really wish we could place in our program with an IEP but are unable to. We have state guidelines and are required to follow them. We evaluate and determine if a disability is present. Then we use functional assessments to determine if the disability is having a negative impact on education and finally, if they require specialized instruction. Being a year behind doesn't necessarily mean an IEP. There are students that don't have disabilities that are a year behind. In my many years of teaching I have worked with students with autism their whole school day, some a couple of hours a day and some an hour a week. There are also some that we evaluate and determine them not in need of services. We have some that need full visual schedules, some need quiet work areas while others work on skills to handle anxiety producing situations. As with previous posters, OT is a related service and can't be a stand alone service. One thing to keep in mind, the school uses the guidelines in hopes that we are doing what is best for the student~keeping the least restrictive environment in mind. However, because they aren't eligible for services in a given year doesn't mean they won't be eligible another year. Always advocate for your child, the school really does appreciate that even though it doesn't always lead to an IEP. I promise you that as a mom, I would advocate for my own children because if I don't then how can I expect it of others?
     
  10. bookwormde

    bookwormde <font color=darkorchid>Heading out now, another ad

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    Yes that is the point, it does not have to impact academic functioning, just educational functioning and progress.
     
  11. KandiB47

    KandiB47 <font color=blue>It's kind of grossing me out to i

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    We had independent neuro psych testing, OT, and speech evals. The school did not test. However, the SE coordinator recently told me the testing was thorough enough for them.

    On a side note, I finally made the hard decision with DS's doctor to trial DS on an ADHD medication for his trouble with concentration and impulsiveness. He has been on it two weeks (Concerta),and he is now doing awesome with his after school program and with homework. He used to have behavior problems and get in trouble most days in his after school program for not following directions. Now, everyday I get a report about how great he is in his program. Also, I no longer fight with him over his homework because he can concentrate on in and complete it. He can also hold a conversation much better and longer. It's like a light switch was flipped. I haven't told anyone he started the medicine because I fear his IEP services will be denied again. His second grade teacher doesn't know he started meds. We have another meeting to determine if he qualifies for an IEP on April 10th.
     
  12. KandiB47

    KandiB47 <font color=blue>It's kind of grossing me out to i

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    These are all great ideas for the IEP meeting next week. I bought a visual calendar for home (On Task, On Time) and it works great. Also, the school psychologist called me and said she would be working with him for his anxiety at school.
     

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