Fear of BBQ failure draining pleasure of upcoming trip

Discussion in 'Budget Board' started by DINKDisneyAddict, May 25, 2010.

  1. DINKDisneyAddict

    DINKDisneyAddict Mouseketeer

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    I have a feeling that our upcoming vacation is going to make me long for Disney even more than I usually do. This month, we have rented a cabin in a state park on top of a mountain. We’ll being staying a long weekend. I am hoping for some solitude, but one ridiculous thing has me concerned…the BBQ pit. DH and I both work full time+, and we eat out a lot….like at least 95% of the time. (I work for a restaurant company, which takes a lot of pressure off of the budget, too.) That being said, we will be cooking for ourselves for the entire weekend. :eek: There is an open grill (the kind that is built into bricks without a lid) at the cabin that DH is convinced we are going to be able to use. Does anyone know of any “BBQing for Dummies” websites? Or good (and extremely easy) recipes for open grill cooking? The things I have googled up so far are making my head spin. :confused: I would think not having a lid on the BBQ would cause it to take forever to cook something like a steak. I think I can handle the side dishes, but I am afraid we will starve for protein up in the mountains if we can’t get this BBQ thing down.

    P.S. I am a city girl through and through, and last summer, I could not start a fire in a pit while camping to save my life. :sad2: I need all the help I can get. There are things I do well in life, but my domestic, kitchen skills verge on pathetic. I would hate to see us waste a bunch of money on food that we ruin and cannot eat. Thank you in advance for any help you can offer. :flower3:
     
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  3. SILLYANDI

    SILLYANDI DIS Veteran

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    If my 10 year old girl scouts can do it you can!:thumbsup2

    Our failsafe GS fire pit recipe is hobos...Diced veges (potatoes, carrots, onions, corn kernels, squash, zucchini, etc), ground beef, salt & pepper rolled up in an aluminum foil "bag". Throw it on the coals for 10 minutes on each side and viola! A great (protein included) meal!


    If you like seafood you can buy some yummy pre seasoned frozen filets at Sam's or Costco and cook them the same way in a foil bag..
     
  4. DINKDisneyAddict

    DINKDisneyAddict Mouseketeer

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    This might explain things. I never made it past Brownie...but I did still make new friends and keep the old...seriously, I met one of my lifelong friends in kindergarten in Brownies!

    Thanks for the hobos idea. That sounds really yummy to me. DH doesn't like to mix certain foods on his plate, :confused3 so I am going to have to run this idea by him. I really only need to come up with 4 solid meals (lunch/dinner type meals).
     
  5. Sarah_Rose

    Sarah_Rose DIS Veteran

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    If you're that concerned about it, I would pay a few extra bucks for a portable propane grill and bring it along with you. We used to have this one: http://www.homedepot.com/Outdoors-Grills-Accessories-Grills/h_d1/N-5yc1vZasfeZ5za01/R-100096094/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053 and it worked fine for cooking steaks, burgers, kabobs, etc. while camping or picnicking. We upgraded to the Weber Q 200 (with a nearly $200 price tag) this year, so that we can cook more complex things while on the go, but the $25 one works fine if you're only going to be using it on occaision.

    Cooking over a charcoal or wood fire is not that difficult for a beginner as long as you go simple (ie. burgers or hot dogs) but if you're that concerned about cooking edible food, I would spend a bit extra for propane. It's pretty difficult to screw up.
     
  6. DINKDisneyAddict

    DINKDisneyAddict Mouseketeer

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    I think this is a smashing idea. Funny you should mention it as one of our friends mentioned that idea tonight as well (while we were dining out at a restaurant :lmao:), but my DH (stubborn DH) says that is admitting defeat. :rolleyes: He really wants to give this a go.
     
  7. powellrj

    powellrj DIS Veteran

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    We have used the portable grills over the years and for just a few people, they are wonderful! I would buy one with a couple of tanks and store it in your trunk. If you don't use it, you can take it back. If you need it, you have it.

    Your protein is easy. You can get all your meats, put them in a ziploc bag with your marinades and freeze them. Keep them in a cooler and you should be good for the weekend.


    Boneless, skinless chicken breast, pork tenderloin chops, steaks, kabobs, salmon. I am ready to grill again today just typing! We did pork tenderloin chops last night on the grill and had guests and they were a huge hit!
     
  8. Golf4food

    Golf4food Male pirate last time I checked. Yep. Still male.

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    If you have an iPhone there are apps that tell you how long to cook/grill everything, or check out a book from the library before you leave and take it with you - or buy a book. There are plenty of resources out there to help you. :)
     
  9. DisneyDizzy

    DisneyDizzy Mouseketeer

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    We love camping, cabins and bbqing. A fail safe way to cook: buy some Match Light Charcoal. No need for lighter fluid and will always light and stay lit. Get a big bag and use plenty. Wait for the coals to turn white-ish and you can cook anything over an open pit. The coals stay hot for a long time so bring Marshmallows, graham crackers and chocolate for an after dinner S'more. :love:
     
  10. dallastxcpa

    dallastxcpa DIS Veteran

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    Why not take your crock pot. I can make a mean brisquet in my crock pot that is so tender and yummy. :)
     
  11. java

    java <font color=darkorchid>I am embracing the Turkey B

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    If you are worried about a "lid" why not just use some aluminum foil over whatever you are cooking- like a steak- just make a little aluminum tent for it.


    I would think you could easily grill chicken breasts on there-(thin cook quickly) or really any kind of fish- I do it similarly to the pp- put it in a tin foil pouch a little oil- fish squeezey of lemon pepper and whatever herbs you love a splash of wine if you have it- seal it up cook on the grill for about 8 minutes depending on the thickness of your fish- you could do another pouch of potatoes oil onions peppers ect.

    Here's a couple of more ideas- step by step
    http://camping.lovetoknow.com/Open_Grill_Outdoor_Cooking_Recipes
     
  12. oldbay

    oldbay Mouseketeer

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    THis exactly! Just get match light and a big box of wooden matches and you will be able to cook almost anything easily. It will also taste better made over a grill. :love: Have a great trip.
     
  13. surfergirl602

    surfergirl602 <font color=deeppink>Well you're one step ahead of

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    just get one of those small little propane grills to bring with you. We'd get the one time use ones for tailgates all the time. I can't grill either. :)
     
  14. plummer925

    plummer925 DIS Veteran

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    How about pre-cooking meals that can be "warmed up" on the BBQ (hamburgers, steaks, etc). Make a bunch of salads (don't add dressings - bring those seperate!). You don't NEED to BBQ for the few days your there...use it to warm up meals.

    Hotdogs on a stick cooked over an open flame is one of my favorites of all time.

    You're staying in a state run campground - so you're going to be roughing it a bit more than you're used to. Take the time to enjoy the nature, and don't worry about COOKING - just do things that are easy.

    Sandwiches for lunch, warmed up meals for dinner. S'mores for dessert. That is what I would do...in fact, hubby and I are staying at a state run campground next week for 3 nights and will be doing just that - we won't be bringing anything to actually "cook" with us. Hotdogs on a stick, steak on a stick, we'll bring a big kettle and do corn on the cob one night (just boil the water, add the corn). Mmm...lobsters would be good too, but that's too much for us...

    Good luck!
     
  15. MomToOne

    MomToOne DIS Veteran

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    Don't panic - if I could learn to BBQ, anyone can!

    Really, I was scared to death. It was always a "man thing" in my book. But there was no man in the house, and my daughter wanted to have a BBQ! So I womaned up, and figured it out. :rotfl2:

    The hardest part is getting the coals hot. There are lots of good directions out there about starting the coals, and how to know when they are the right temp. If nothing else, read the back of your charcoal bag!

    From there, I suggest grilling either hamburgers or hot dogs like someone else suggested, or going for steaks. Avoid chicken, esp. chicken parts with bones still in. Beef is forgiving if you undercook it or overcook it a bit (may not be done to your likeness but it's usually still edible) - chicken is not! Pork is iffy - if it gets overcooked, it gets too dried out for me, so I wouldn't attempt it the first time out. I'd avoid ribs, because the bones make it harder to judge cooking time, etc. Although if you really,really want ribs, one trick is to parboil them first (at home presumably), then only finish them off on the grill.

    If you are concerned about the lack of cover for the grill, just take a box of aluminum foil with you. With that, you can fashion an impromptu cover for the meat if you really need it.
     
  16. YoMickey

    YoMickey Mouseketeer DVC Gold

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    I would invest in some cast iron skillets and pots.

    We haven't camped in some time but I would always make a large batch of chili and freeze it into a large ice block to keep things cool. Use it when it thaws out.

    Pre-cook some chicken breasts or ribs and finish them over the coals.

    If you're new to it there's no reason to make it difficult.

    oh....and pretend you are at Fort Wilderness.
     
  17. maggiew

    maggiew DIS Veteran

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    OK. For some reason I find this hilarious. They are out in the woods in a cabin "roughing it" and they whip out their iPhone to use an app to tell them how to cook! :rotfl:

    I'm not making fun of the poster or the OP. Its just a funny image.

    I will tell you one thing. Don't put a frozen pizza on the grate! DH & I attempted camping one time when the kids were younger. We tried the pizza thing and it was a disaster! Imagine dripping cheese down into the fire! We never camped again. (Anyone want an only-used-once LL Bean tent! ha ha)

    Maggie
     
  18. CTdiznymom

    CTdiznymom DIS Veteran

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    Matchlight coals work great, just remember NOT to use any lighter fluid. DH did that once and only once:scared1:

    You can pre made foil packets of either marinated chicken breasts with some juilienned veggies, or even fish packets. Just place them on the grill and turn them half way thru. Fresh corn on the grill is delish. Soak the whole ear in water, wrap in foil with some butter (pull back some husk and rub it on) and grill it up.

    Have a great time.
     
  19. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    Everyone left off the biggest Oh-oh issue with outdoor built-in grills -- the dirt factor.

    Not once in my life have I ever encountered a clean communal grill; you're going to have to clean that sucker before you can use it. You have a couple of choices for that: you can fire-clean it, by building a large wood fire (with actual flames) and burning off the leftover gunk, or by bringing a grill stone and scouring it. The "lid" thing isn't an issue, you just need to turn the food (bring long tongs.)

    Also, check the pit for small animal carcasses before you start. (We found a dead skunk in one once.) In winter animals tend to creep in to get warm after the pit has been used, and sometimes they can't get out.
     
  20. plummer925

    plummer925 DIS Veteran

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    You can also simply cover the grill with tin foil.
     
  21. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    Except that foil defeats the entire purpose of using real wood to cook over. You don't get a smoked flavor when you use foil, and it takes easily twice as long.
     

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