Eisner enters the baseball card business

Discussion in 'Disney Rumors and News' started by crazy4wdw, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. crazy4wdw

    crazy4wdw DIS Veteran

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    Eisner enters the baseball card business
    Former Disney CEO's privately held firm part of group that purchased venerable trading card manufacturer Topps in a deal worth $385.4 million.
    March 6 2007: 8:27 AM EST

     
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  3. All Aboard

    All Aboard Por favor mantengan se alejado de las puertas

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    Gosh, it sure seemed longer.

    Anybody know how to photoshop a Derek Jeter bobblehead into a snowglobe?
     
  4. Horace Horsecollar

    Horace Horsecollar <font color=blue>DVC members represent a unique ca

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    It was longer. Someone at CNNMoney.com needs a remedial arithmetic lesson.

    Eisner was CEO of The Walt Disney Company from September 1984 to September 2005. That looks like about 21 years to me.
     
  5. 2Xited4Disney

    2Xited4Disney DIS Veteran

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    Eisner is so wierd....
     
  6. flyinglizard

    flyinglizard DIS Veteran

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    Hmmm... I would expect trading cards to go to $1.00 a pack, with one card inside... no gum.

    Not sure what production budgets he'll cut, but he is good at that.

    Expect him to build the company, siphon off the top and then sell it!

    Good-Bye Topps... an American tradition for many years.
     
  7. HarambeGuy

    HarambeGuy Jambo!

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    Um, the gum is already long gone and you're lucky to get 2-3 quality cards for a dollar as it is. And forget about collecting all the cards of your favorite player. There are so many companies and so many product lines out there that each star player is featured on scores of cards annually - many of them randomly inserted as prizes in the overpriced packs. I gave up on the baseball card hobby quite a while ago.

    Seriously, greed is already so pervasive in that industry that a guy like Eisner is not going to have much of an impact.
     
  8. DancingBear

    DancingBear DIS Veteran

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    Yeah, it'd be more accurate to say that Eisner endured (ignored?) 11 years of criticism before resigning as CEO.
     
  9. EUROPACL

    EUROPACL DIS Veteran

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    11 YEARS that seems to put it around 1994 isn't that when Frank Wells died? Maybe it was some kind of Freudian slip by the writer.
     
  10. Another Voice

    Another Voice Charter Member of The Element

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    That may be the clue. Eisner took over a couple additional titles when Frank Wells passed away. I'll have to look it all up, but I thought that Eisner was CEO and Wells was President - after the accident Eisner became CEO, President and Chairman of the Board.

    Eisner awarded himself coporate titles like a tinpot dictator awards himself medals. It's going to take an effort to untangle.
     
  11. Horace Horsecollar

    Horace Horsecollar <font color=blue>DVC members represent a unique ca

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    Frank Wells joined Disney as President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) in 1984, posts that he held until his tragic death in 1994.

    According to Michael Eisner's biography at Disney's Corporate Information site, Michael Eisner was Chief Executive Officer (CEO) from 1984 to September 2005 and Chairman of the Board from 1984 to March 2004.

    In other words, Eisner joined Disney as CEO and Chairman in 1984. Frank Wells was never CEO or Chairman.

    In 1995, Eisner tried to fill the position of President of Disney with his friend Michael Ovitz. Officially, that lasted 14 months; in reality Ovitz never really took on the functions of a corporate president. It turned out Eisner had made a bad choice.

    After that, the position of President of The Walt Disney Company was vacant until 2000, when Robert Iger became President. (Iger became CEO in 2005).
     
  12. Another Voice

    Another Voice Charter Member of The Element

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    Then I think Eisner took Frank's COO title then (it's like a soap opera there behind the drawves).

    Also in the mix was that Jeffrey Katzenberg assumed he would be named either President and/or COO after the death of Frank as well. Eisner's refusal to promote Katzenberg lead to their falling out and the creation of Dreamworks and the effective end of Disney's "major studio" status.
     
  13. DancingBear

    DancingBear DIS Veteran

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    Ovitz was a bad choice AND Eisner undercut him.

    http://www.slate.com/id/2105223
     
  14. raidermatt

    raidermatt Beware of the dark side. Anger...fear...aggression

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    Yeah, but he had a hell of an office, or so I hear.
     
  15. EUROPACL

    EUROPACL DIS Veteran

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    He also got a hell of a payday....just think how many direct to video movies or Bad Company II sequels we could have got with that money. Just think Go.com could have gone on for another 3 months!!!!!
     

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