Dress code?

Discussion in 'Disney Restaurants' started by old lost boy, May 7, 2006.

  1. old lost boy

    old lost boy Yes, I am a pirate, 200 years too late

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    DW and I leave Friday (hooray). We are planning to eat at California Grill and Blue Zoo among some others. When I called to make our ADR I was told that the dress code for those two was business casual. Is this a suggestion or a rule? We've eaten at California grill several times in the past and I wore shorts. Something new?
     
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  3. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    All rules are suggestions. Disney relies on the integrity of their guests to comply with things like the dress code policy.

    Short, however, aren't necessarily in violation of the dress code. Nice dress shorts are considered completely appropriate in the hot Florida sun.
     
  4. Peter Pirate

    Peter Pirate Its not the end of civilization...But you can see

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    It is bicker's opinion only that Disney rely's on what he calls "integrity" of the guests to comply with the code. The fact is the code is a very loose suggestion that is never enforced. I had a recent thread in which I told of my experience last weekend. I made reservations at Artist Point and was told "There is a business casual dress code. This means no beach attire." This was a verbatum quote.

    Disney only cares that you are presentable and have money.
    pirate:
     
  5. BCV23

    BCV23 <br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/i DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    And that would be Peter's opinion. ;)

    Mine is that WDW does care or they wouldn't go to the bother of making such an explicit list of what is considered Business Casual. Although the CM told Peter that it just meant no beach wear, in my experience if you ask the CM to read what it means, the list is pretty explicit in the last year or two. Include are collared shirts and most men comply with that. But if someone wears a Tshirt and is presentable, I doubt they would be refused entry because WDW cares so much about its guests' happiness.

    So I think bicker is correct when he says that WDW is relying on guests to comply.

    And yes, this is my opinion. :sunny:

    Happily for the OP, the list does include business shorts.
     
  6. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    It's Peter's opinion only that it is my opinion only. :lmao:

    What's really funny is that the rest of Peter's message agreed with what I wrote, 100%. :rotfl:
     
  7. eeyoregirl

    eeyoregirl A dream is a wish your heart makes.

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    It's only my opinion, by why would anyone want to go to an expensive restaurant wearing flip-flops and halter tops or tank tops? If I am spending that kind of money, I am going to dress up--at least a little. Otherwise, I would feel really out of place. :teeth:
     
  8. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    Business shorts? Isn't that sort of oxymoronic? (the term, NOT the poster!)
     
  9. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    Well, I could say why would anyone want to go to an expensive restaurant and order chicken! :rotfl: Folks have different tastes. If the restaurant encourages such attire, I see nothing wrong with enjoying culinary artistry while dressed that way.
     
  10. Alan the Foodie

    Alan the Foodie Earning My Ears

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    When going to the California Grill, my daughter made sure I was dressed in a collared shirt and slacks for an 8:00 dinner. We were waiting to give our names when the couple in front of us with no ADR asked about possible seating as they were guests in the contemporary. Although their dress was certainly less than anything I wore to the parks (T shirts and shorts) and they were older than I (51) they were told about 1 1/2 hours, and they agreed. The staff didn't mention to change and obviously these people had hoped for immediate seating, so dress seems to e preference over hardcore rules.

    Alan
     
  11. eeyoregirl

    eeyoregirl A dream is a wish your heart makes.

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    I agree and acknowledge that people have different tastes. Whether people are chicken-eaters, beef-eaters, or [fill in the blank]-eaters, I think that people should dress appropriately according to where they are dining. As I posted before, this is my opinion. :rolleyes:
     
  12. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    As do I. Sorry for my confusion: I thought you were implying that all expensive restaurants should have a dress code that prohibits flip-flops and halter tops or tank tops. My mistake.
     
  13. BCV23

    BCV23 <br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/i DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    :rotfl:
    I know. I think I laughed the first time I heard it. But I think it is WDW's way of discouraging cutoffs or short shorts while indicating nice walking shorts are OK in the FL heat. Actually, they do mention no cutoffs.

    Although I guess nice shorts are still acceptable business attire in Bermuda. :sunny:
     
  14. blueroses

    blueroses always planning the next trip

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    Ask that to the hoards of people who were at CA Grill in their themepark finest when I was there last month. So tacky.

    And, yes, before anyone asks, it does matter to me how other people look when I'm out dining. No matter how good the food is, you can't just build a cocoon around your table and completely forget the other patrons. The thing is people (with the notable acception of the fine people on the DIS, I'm sure) act differently when they are wearing nicer clothes. They are a little quieter, a little more respectful of the establishment where they are dining.

    I don't mean that men need to wear jackets and ties and women need to wear dresses and pantyhose (I'd never wish that on anyone in the FL heat). Wear your long shorts and a nice shirt. Go back to your room to freshen up after a day at the parks. Most people don't have to be explicitly told things like this.

    My husband and I ate at AP on our last trip and he asked me why other guests were wearing jeans and I insisted he put on khakis before we went down there. I told him they must not have wives who care.
     
  15. Quinn222

    Quinn222 DIS Veteran

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    I'm right there with you. Instead of worrying if WDW really means it wouldn't it be nice if people were just courteous to fellow diners who might be trying to have a nice evening out and don't really want to be sitting downwind of their sweaty theme park clothes or looking at their hairy armpits. It's not that hard to put on dressier shorts or slacks or a skirt and a clean shirt that doesn't have a phrase or a mouse on it.

    JMO of course and it doesn't apply to most places but the Signature places where they tell you it's business casual I don't think it's too much to ask for guests to follow it.
     
  16. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    I believe a comment like, "they must not have wives who care," is out-of-line, and perhaps even tackier than folks neglecting to comply with a host's declared dress code. :confused3

    That's a good point, and goes along with "don't deceive Disney about your children's ages," "don't use hotel pool facilities at hotels you're not registered at," and "don't ignore posted signs saying refillable mugs are only good at the one hotel for the one vacation trip." However, it is becoming obvious that that which people have traditionally not needed to be explicitly told they now need to be explicitly told, and perhaps for some of these things the only way people will do what is right is if there is some police presence monitoring the situation! :)
     
  17. blueroses

    blueroses always planning the next trip

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    I stand by it. It's along the same lines as "they must not have been raised right," which is a sentiment I heard used a lot growing up in the South (not using toward me, just in conversation).
     
  18. bicker

    bicker DIS Veteran<br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/di

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    Equally out-of-line and tacky, IMHO. I think we can rest comfortably talking about specific actions and behaviors as bad, but it isn't good to label people.
     
  19. blueroses

    blueroses always planning the next trip

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    Truce, bicker.
    I lurk a lot and agree with many of your thoughts. And, even if I didn't, I do not mean to provoke you or anyone else.
     
  20. El Tel

    El Tel Mouseketeer

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    I'm taking good note of this as I'm planning to go to the California Grill in October - unless convinced otherwise. I'm packing my best costume :clown: especially ;)
    I'm also intending to go to the Brown Derby. I thought it is a 'fine dining' restaurant too, but the CM at WDW-DINE didn't say anything about dress code. Is there one for BD?
     
  21. BCV23

    BCV23 <br><img src="http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/i DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    No, there is not. :sunny:
     

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