Am I The Only Dummy To Buy DCL Trip Insurance?

Discussion in 'Disney Cruise Line Forum' started by lugnut33, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. disney1990

    disney1990 <font color=royalblue>Wow, it make my heart skip a

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    We also use Disney's insurance - because they don't charge you for it until your "pay in full date". As I understand it, other companies charge you when you purchase it. Therefore, if I cancel or change the date, I have already paid for the insurance on a cruise I am not taking.

    Can anybody tell me this is not the case?
     
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  3. lugnut33

    lugnut33 DIS Veteran

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    Hey there everybody, this is the OP. I went on the Dream at the end of June, with DCL travel insurance, and nothing happened. Didn't need it, but still glad I got it because of the money involved.

    I have also read through all 15 pages of this thread and I'm a little smarter, but I still think this whole travel insurance thing is akin to black magic. I mean, everything could be considered a pre-existing condition. Shouldn't only truly fit people (like those who are young and can run a full marathon) be eligible for insurance? I'm overweight, so insn't that a pre-existing condition for just about every health issue that exists on this earth? People who carry excess weight around the chest area are a heart attack waiting to happen. People who like bacon are also ready to drop over. I don't know, it all seems so crazy.

    I did take advantage of booking a future cruise on board, but didn't buy any travel insurance in that magical 14 day window. Now reading through this thread I learn that I've lost any opportunity at a great rate and the beer I drank yesterday will now be a pre-existing condition.

    Oh, and thanks to all that have posted a ton of valuable information in this thread.
     
  4. mellers

    mellers DIS Veteran

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    The appropriate answer is--it depends. If you purchase CSA insurance, it is usually about the same as DCL's insurance (at least the last time I checked), although it is still more than other carriers. It does cover pre-existing conditions (although to a lower dollar amount than other carriers) and you can purchase CSA insurance within 24 hours of your paid-in-full date.
     
  5. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    It should be in the policy they sent you when you purchased the insurance. Which should be the same as the policy from DCL's site that I posted the link to a few posts back. I think you need to call DCL and ask them specifically about the future cruise credit if your claim is denied. I would think someone should have mentioned it, but if you were focused on getting reimbursed, they might have been answering that question. I do think it's remiss of them not to have mentioned the future cruise credit.

    That is somewhat the case. Yes, outside insurance companies ask you to pay for the insurance as soon as you buy it. But most insurance companies will let you change the date of the policy (to cover the new date or new vacation). Some will only let you do it once, but others will let you change multiple times. You really need to ask the specific insurance company what their policy is before you purchase. Also, if you get the pre-existing condition waiver by buying the insurance within the 14 (or 21) days required by the policy, then you usually need to inform the insurance company of the change within that time period (say 14 days after you change your cruise date) in order to keep the waiver.

    The thing is, also, DCL doesn't even buy the policy for you until you have paid in full. It's not that they put off billing you, they put off the entire purchase. So you aren't covered for anything until you have paid in full. Of course, the cruise is pretty much refundable until you pay in full, so it's sort of a moot point.

    And you could do the exact same thing with an outside insurance company, too. Just wait until you pay in full to buy the policy. Unless you buy CSA, you won't be getting a pre-existing condition waiver, but you don't get that with DCL, either.

    Sayhello
     
  6. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    Having the *potential* for a pre-existing condition is not the same as having a pre-existing condition. Are you on medication for being overweight? Has that medication changed in the 2 - 3 months prior to you purchasing the insurance? Are you being treated for heart problems? There actually are some very specific requirements as to what qualifies as a pre-existing condition and what doesn't. If you read through the policy you bought, it will tell you quite specifically what it would cover & what it would not.

    Sayhello
     
  7. lugnut33

    lugnut33 DIS Veteran

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    I'm going to take the Eeyore approach and just figure they would decline anything I'd submit.

    I really dislike insurance companies, sorry.

    I take some mild blood pressure meds, so that excludes me from everything.
     
  8. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    No it doesn't. The definition of a pre-existing condition only counts what has happened in the look-back period before you bought the insurance. If you have a long-term blood-pressure issue that has been stable (no changes in your condition or treatment) during the look-back period (usually 60 to 90 days prior to purchasing the insurance) then that blood pressure issue is NOT considered a pre-existing condition. You're right, based on your definition, no-one would be able to make a claim.

    I bought insurance for a hiking trip to Yosemite. After I purchased the insurance (therefore, after the look-back period), I started to have shoulder issues. 2 weeks before the trip, my shoulder got much worse & extremely painful. Turned out I had a minor tear in my rotator cuff, which meant hiking (especially carrying a daypack) was out of the question. The insurance not only reimbursed me for the hiking trip I had to cancel, they paid the change fees for my plane ticket so that I could still do the second half of my trip, which was to visit family in Northern California. They were wonderful to work with, and extremely helpful.

    Sayhello
     
  9. mellers

    mellers DIS Veteran

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    I agree for the most part, unless your focus is making sure you get treatment on the cruise if you get sick, and you have a pre-existing condition not covered by the look-back. At that point, the issue isn't that you do or don't get to take your cruise, it's that you can be treated if something goes wrong.

    People need to understand that there is risk no matter what you decide to do:

    If you decide to buy from a third-party insurer who has great pre-existing coverage, you'll be stuck with the bill if you don't take the cruise (although, as Sayhello points out, many will allow you to change the cruise once.) Also, you won't be able to apply your cruise fare to a future cruise if your claim is denied. However, if you get that mammogram result you didn't want, you have the choice to take the cruise without fear of medical bills if something goes wrong, and if you are too ill to take the cruise, you can get your money back. You can also insure flights, shore excursions and hotels that you book yourself this way, and you can't through DCL.

    If you decide to buy from CSA, it is expensive and the total medical coverage is per group, not per person. It costs about the same as DCL (or did, the last time I checked), but does not have the advantage that, if you don't take your cruise, you could apply your cruise fare to a future cruise. However, this is really your only option if you need medical coverage and have a pre-existing condition which does not meet the requirements of the look-back period. Sometimes, it makes more sense to take a policy without a pre-existing condition waiver, even if you have a pre-existing condition, depending on how it works with the look-back period, as Sayhello points out. You can also insure your self-booked flights, shore excursions, and hotels this way, where you can't through DCL.

    If you decide to buy from DCL, you need to be very careful about changes to your health. If you get the scary news that the mammogram wasn't clear, or you're in for a heart attack, and it is before your paid-in-full date, decide whether or not you really want to take the cruise, and if the answer is "yes", cancel DCL and get CSA--that way, you won't trip the pre-existing conditions clause. You need to remember, anything you get before the paid-in-full date is an uncovered pre-existing condition, unless the "look-back" clause covers it. You also need to be aware that you will need to cover flights, hotels, and self-book excursions separately. However, DCL insurance has the big plus that they will allow you to put your cruise fare towards a future cruise if your claim is denied.

    The question is not whether or not you want to take a risk, but which risks you judge to be greater. For my family and me, the risk of high medical bills while on ship is our most serious threat, so we take out third-party policies with great medical coverage. We are less concerned about losing our cruise fare, since we can schedule our vacations pretty easily. If, however, you have a job that can cancel your vacation, you'll probably want a policy that will allow you to cancel for any reason, and Disney will probably give you the best return on that, provided medical issues are not your most serious problem.
     
  10. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    The person I replied to was concerned about losing the money paid for the insurance if she canceled or changed a cruise. I wasn't answering about coverage; I was answering about options if you cancel or change a trip having outside insurance vs. DCL. Has nothing to do with the medical portion of the coverage. Of course it's important to us to have pre-existing condition coverage, but anyone contemplating DCL coverage has already passed on that option.

    One thing worth noting here, even if you buy CSA within 24 hours of your paid in full date, that does not automatically mean you get a pass for pre-existing conditions. You have to be able to travel at the time you buy your insurance. So if you're already sick, and a doctor says you're too sick to travel, you can't cancel the DCL insurance & buy CSA. Their policy (and lots of others) states:

    Sayhello
     
  11. mellers

    mellers DIS Veteran

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    Excellent points, both.
     
  12. tink1953

    tink1953 Tink rocks!!!!!!!

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  13. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    This is interesting; I've never heard this. Where in the life cycle are you? Have you already Paid in Full? If not, that's really strange, because I have always been told that *everything* including the airfare and insurance is fully refundable up until Paid in Full date. (Unless you're concierge).

    If you're already Paid in Full, then I'd understand it, because the airfare & policy have already been purchased for you (DCL does not issue the policy. They buy it from Allianz on your behalf.)

    Sayhello
     
  14. tink1953

    tink1953 Tink rocks!!!!!!!

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    No only paid for flight and the $200 deposit...just did it two days ago...

    they are not wanting to budge on this, you can't even talk to a supervisor or anyone other then the CM...

    gave me and email that I will be sending out and see what they have to say...

     
  15. sayhello

    sayhello Have Camera, Will Travel Moderator

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    You need to get on the phone and firmly (but nicely) insist they transfer you to a supervisor. You have a right to talk to a supervisor whether they can help you or not! Keep calling back until you get a CM who will transfer you to a supervisor.

    Sayhello
     
  16. petchie

    petchie DIS Veteran

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    Are you talking about a Disney Cruise Vacation or a Disney Resort Vacation?
    They are 2 different policies for 2 different companies with 2 different sets of rules.
     
  17. petchie

    petchie DIS Veteran

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    My apologies, I did not realize this was an old thread.
     
  18. AudreyKThompson

    AudreyKThompson Disney Diva

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    This!!
     
  19. mike0035

    mike0035 Earning My Ears

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    Does anyone know what would be the best way to get trip insuance for a DIS cruise if you pay part for cash and part for DVC points? Would I need to buy 2 different ins policys, 1 to cover the half paid with pts and 1 to cover the half with cash?
     
  20. QuiltTeddy

    QuiltTeddy DIS Veteran

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    Call DVC, they can tell you.


    We always buy insurance.
     

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