Adhd

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by pooch, May 27, 2014.

  1. pooch

    pooch Still feeling special!!

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    DH & I are on the early stages of planning a family trip for next year. DS, DDIL, 3 DGs & us. The oldest (6) has ADHD. He was pretty good on his meds ( don't know what he takes) until a couple weeks ago. And now it doesn't seem to help at all. I know things will get better, worse, better....... Over the next year or so. But I'd love to hear some strategies. I am a compulsive planner and not sure that is good for him. Thoughts?
     
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  3. JenVi

    JenVi Earning My Ears

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    He may need to have his meds changed or the dose changed. We go through this with our son and after so many months and all the dosage changes we can do we end up changing meds. It seems as though the body just gets used to the meds and then they don't work.

    Good Luck

    Jen
     
  4. pooch

    pooch Still feeling special!!

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    At his age, a growth spurt can throw the dosage off easily. My son has epilepsy & while he was growing up, we had to fix the dosage frequently. As Gramma, I try not to tell them how to handle their son's disability, but.....

    Thank you for the encouragement.
     
  5. cobright

    cobright DIS Veteran

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    To the OP,are you the one giving the meds to the boy? If not, take an interest in whether he's actually taking them. My daughter and myself have ADD pretty bad and her 'bad' days can often be traced back to me forgetting to give her her meds or me forgetting to get her Rx filled.

    At 6, he's likely taking concerts, an extended release form of Ritalin. Maybe adderal xr, but that would surprise me. In either case, tolerance builds very slowly and plateus for most people. Even rapid growth spurts would do little, the med crosses straight to the brain. Even if his dose got way out of whack you would see some benefit. maybe it would wear off a bit early. My normal dose is 40mg of adderal xr. If all I have is 10 mg of the instant release, I take it and I get by.

    Get on the kid's wavelength and get him to describe his meds every day.
     
  6. ZenDaisy

    ZenDaisy Earning My Ears

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    My son has been on ADHD meds for about a year. They worked like a charm for the first few months, then he had some more off days. Then he had few good days to more bad ones, and in the last few months, nothing works. We tried switching the dosage, switching the brand... nope. So we're back to not medicating. (He's 7, btw.) Doc said it's pretty common.

    That said, he's the best behaved when we're at Disney. There's SO MUCH going on that it really ties down his focus, and he's not all over the place. He even sleeps better down there! :thumbsup2
     
  7. pooch

    pooch Still feeling special!!

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    is most concerned about the plane ride, having him trapped in a confined space for a couple of hours. He has been really good with focusing on coloring (he's my artist!) or his leap pad & we'll have the portable dvd player. But if he does have a melt down, its not gonna be pretty or easy on everyone else on the plane!

    And to a PP, my son (his step-dad) has epilepsy and is acutely aware of the importance of consistent dosing. He is going to the pediatrician tomorrow. My (worthless) 2 cents is that his afternoon dose needs to be taken earlier in the day so that its in him before the normal chaos of getting picked up from daycare, getting home, fed, bathed etc. push him beyond his ability to handle.

    But really, to get back to my original question, I am looking for strategies for park touring etc. For example, we plan on going during Free Dining (assuming it is offered) DH likes the reg plan & I am looking at staying at CSR. But the 2 DGs (including my little ADHD artist) who live with my son & his wife are not good at sitting in restaurants. But the issue seems to be waiting for the food to arrive so if we did character buffets..... Also thought they might like T-Rex. But might the structure of ADRs be an issue in and of itself.... Just trying to wrap my uberplanner head around what would be best for HIM. I want him to have a good time.
     
  8. mistysue

    mistysue DIS Veteran

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    If there are 3 kids age 7 and under and they are not the type to sit for meals you probably shouldn't try to make them.
    The buffets will likely be easier but there is no way to guarantee that a non-buffet will be quick and sometimes you get stuck waiting at buffets for a bit. (wait for the check.. wait for them to close it out...) At least somebody could leave with the kids if they can't take it. We've had buffets where we were done in 20 minutes but there over an hour waiting to go.

    The adhd likely won't effect your planning. Kids don't sit because they are kids. The adhd may aggravate it but your dealing with youth at that point. Luckily, if you follow a good touring plan and avoid parks the bloggers tell you to avoid for certain days the only wait issue will be food.

    Honestly Trex may not be the best plan because sometime you luck out and get sat in an exciting area, and sometimes you get sat in a spot where all you want to do is run around looking at the exciting spots. We've been sat in the latter twice. Both of our meals there took in the 60-90 minute range. It was long and we had to keep walking the kids around to see everything.
     
  9. DisGirl819

    DisGirl819 <font color=blue>Then I thought about it and reali

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    My six year old daughter has both ADHD and is on the autism spectrum. She struggles to sit for meals too but I bring many distractions and ask for a small food first and quickly (like crackers or carrots). She is great on plane ride but I bring art supplies (crayons and paper), books, and the iPad for movies and games. Bring distractions and bring a few extra. Also be prepared to either have you or the parent take a child out of the restaurant if they act up so that they can decompress and calm down. I found it's also helpful to explain expectations and rules for behavior ahead of time. I always stop before entering a restaurant and tell my kids three basic rules: sit quietly, no yelling and you will exit the restaurant for loud or rude behavior. Good luck with the planning.
     
  10. KristenFNJ

    KristenFNJ Mouseketeer

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    I know your original question is not about medication :) but I imagine you're quite savvy about brain medication, having had to medicate your own child's brain! I don't have a clue how epilepsy meds work, or if they're anything like ADHD meds, but with your background knowledge I thought you might like further insight that could help pinpoint your concern about your DGS's medication, learn more about the various considerations with stimulants and maybe narrow what questions you might want to ask your son to better understand your little guy's exact situation...

    In general, if the morning dose was previously lasting long enough to relieve his symptoms until the afternoon dose was taken (at the same times he takes both meds now), but suddenly the morning med is not lasting until the afternoon dose, then it's likely that he's becoming tolerant of the morning medication. One of the ways to know you're on the right dose of an ADHD medication in general, is that it provides symptom relief for the duration of hours that it's supposed to. When it starts to wear off sooner, then it's time to increase the dose.

    Moving up the afternoon dose wouldn't counteract the growing tolerance in the long term, but would result in a "doubling up" on the medication by overlapping. With different medications (even the same medication at different dosages and release times) containing different release mechanisms and inactive ingredients, having multiple stimulants in the bloodstream at once could compound the negative side effects.

    If the time of struggle is end-of-workday, he's likely already on an extended release in the morning and the 10mg is a booster that's intended to get him through that evening transition. If it's determined that the dosing is adequate but the timing is off, one alternative is to give the first dose earlier, which may or may not be convenient (especially if you'd have to wake him!). If that 10mg does end up kicking in and effectively helping his symptoms every night (just after the chaotic time when you need it to work!), the timing could make all the difference, just as you suspect.

    I'll be honest, one of my sons was prescribed the 10mg booster to help him through evening activities like scouts, and truthfully it just didn't work at all. The dose wasn't high enough, but bumping it up so close to bedtime would be recipe for disaster (he struggles with sleep). It could be that it just doesn't work for your little guy either. Or, if it doesn't impact his sleep, maybe that 10mg should be bumped up and you'd all benefit. I'm sure the pediatrician has gone over all of these scenarios (and more!) with your son, I hope that they arrived at a plan to help get you all through that crazy evening chaos! Even though you're not a decision-making parent in this scenario, I'm sure your son appreciates you taking the time to learn about the moving parts that they have to deal with. Too often, we parents deal with family members who know nothing about our children's ADHD, and that can be an awful uphill battle. He's lucky to have your support!
     
  11. KristenFNJ

    KristenFNJ Mouseketeer

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    ...as to your actual question :blush: :)

    The waiting can be excruciating. I'm feeling your anxiety, I've been there! The key to taming the ADHD brain is stimulation-enough interest gets the dopamine flowing, which enables self-regulation and actually slows us down. The art here is finding the right stimulation, which is not a science and can depend on factors like hunger and fatigue. But even with those variables, with little kids, especially in a new and exciting place, stimulation might not be as hard to come by as you'd think. A small handful of items, basic as they may be be, have gotten us through restaurants with 3 ADHD boys for 12 years now! I'm not gonna lie, it requires you to fully engage at a time when you probably need a break more than they do. But that's the price we pay for peace!

    -Matchbox Cars. We would make a car track out of silverware and pass the car back and forth. If there was a paper menu (that was not useful as a coloring page) we would fold it like a tent and make it the tunnel. Can also be done with Thomas trains. Even better, when the table cloth is paper and you can draw tracks.

    -Coloring. My mom hoards the small crayon boxes they give away at some restaurants. LOL This a great time to pick up a few thin and/or small Disney coloring books-help them find the characters they saw that day, etc... In the absence of coloring books, post-its provide endless entertainment. They can draw anything they want, and stick in on anything. Great for practicing letters-stick this F on the thing that starts with F...

    -Stickers. So many options here. My kids love to put them on themselves (tip: double-check laundry!) but plain paper will often do. Or, go for the sticker books. There are countless, in all sizes. Disney theme would be great, as you could easily re-direct their attention to the stickers by asking about characters from the day, etc...

    -Pressed Pennies. Now, this requires a little more investment, of both time and money, but if they get pressed pennies during the day, they have instant entertainment when they sit down to eat. If you get them each a little Pressed Penny Case, they can arrange their pennies, they can make crayon rubbings of the designs, then at the next meal there are new ones to re-arrange and make rubbings of. Now, this means you have to carry the cases, and bring enough coins to be able to get them each as many as you desire. You'll have to give this some thought and get the parents' permission. (If it's a go, it helps to bring a roll of quarters and pennies.) Then they have a great souvenir and a new collection too. My kids actually started their collection at the Statue of Liberty-this sort of thing transcends Disney. :)

    -Just your eyes. Looking games, like I spy. This might not work everywhere, but so many of these places are so incredibly themed, there is eye candy everywhere. As you're walking in, try to notice interesting patterns, objects, etc... so that if you see a freak-out approaching you can cut it off with a quick redirection towards finding 3 blue things, or I see a picture of Pluto on that wall, can you see it?

    -Hidden Mickeys. And this is for the whole park-ride and show queues, restaurants, resorts, even inside/during rides and shows. The Disney Imagineers have built the Mickey head silhouette into the art, architecture and design all over WDW. There is a book that tells you where to look. It's broken down by park, attraction, restaurant, etc so you can bookmark the pages you think you'll need. The clues are given in both difficult and easy versions, so you can totally do it with little ones. If you are waiting in a restaurant, you might be able to walk around with them to find hidden mickeys while waiting for food, given the right circumstances RE crowds, not disturbing other guests, etc.

    Honestly, Hidden Mickeys are one of my absolute favorite things about WDW-we have a blast with it every time! I get the books at Barnes & Noble-they are updated every couple of years to keep up with park changes/expansion, so if you're interested, try to look for the most recent version.

    The plane, I know is a different animal. Your flight is probably 2 1/2 hours? At least one movie, should eat up a chunk of time. Now, my ADHDers tend to ask for their same favorite movies over and over, but even though they insist on the repeats they often lose interest in them part way through. If you can bring at least one new movie that he hasn't seen, you have a better chance of keeping his attention for it's duration.

    Simple hands-on crafts are good for plane rides too. If they will be having autograph books, maybe you can give them books that are blank and provide each of them with a set of pictures of the characters and a glue stick. They can glue the pictures to the left-sides of the page spreads and when they're waiting to meet each character they can look through their book to find the right picture.

    Those bigger sticker books are great on the plane too. Games are hard, even travel-size, with pieces to manage, and even simple playing cards slide around... the possible "I dropped it" crisis just makes it not worth it.

    I hope one or two of these suggestions sparks an idea you think might for your kids! If I think of anything else, I'll come back around!
     
  12. design_mom

    design_mom <font color=royalblue>I am probably more like my d

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    We found these "sticker puzzles" to be great for restaurants. They seemed to keep our daughter's attention longer than other restaurant diversions, and they are a quiet activity.

    The puzzles are sticker pages with a bunch of square stickers in jumbled up order. Each sticker has a small number in the corner. There are also paper pages with a numbered grid. When you stick each sticker to its corresponding spot on the grid, it forms a picture. There are a number of Disney puzzle books available.

    Here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Disney-Pixar-Cars-Sticker-Puzzles/dp/B0014CABI4
     
  13. pooch

    pooch Still feeling special!!

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    Thank you all for your suggestions & support. DS took him to the pediatrician this past week. She told him that the afternoon dose was being given too late ( like 6pm). They've arranged for him to get that dose when he gets back to daycare from school, like 3:30, I picked him up today and he seemed better. Time will tell I guess!
     
  14. pooch

    pooch Still feeling special!!

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    Oops double post
     
  15. Hope Counts

    Hope Counts Earning My Ears

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    I would look into fidget toys or similar small unobtrusive activities/toys that he can enjoy.
    And like with any kid on a plane it's never a bad idea to stock up on cheap new items that will entertain him (and for the other kids too).
    New box of crayons and coloring books, a new matchbox car or two, that kind of thing based on what each kid is into.
    You could make a bag for each hour of the flight so he has something new every so often if the kid needs it. Of course if a kid is perfectly happy with something you can save the next bag until they need it
     
  16. KristenFNJ

    KristenFNJ Mouseketeer

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    So glad to hear they have a solution to the medication problem! :) I'm sure that's a relief for everyone involved!!!
     
  17. Fakermage

    Fakermage Earning My Ears

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    My wife, my son and I all are ADHD. As you guess this makes for a very confusing trips to disney. The Boy is the only one of us on meds currently although all three of us have been on meds at sometime.

    Boy has 30 mg of Adderall. 20/10

    Our plan was for Dad and Boy to get up and get moving to the park early. Get the coasters with short lines in the morning and Wife joins us a couple of hours after opening. When the lines started to get longer our fast passes were kicking in so we didn't have to wait for more then 15 minutes for each of the rides.

    Lunch was about 11:40 and table service. This gave Boy a rest and a chance to play on our phones while we waited for our food. Afternoon we got our fourth fast pass for around 2pm and went to watch a show and ride something with a short wait. Boy got to read a comic or other book he liked.

    then it was back to the hotel for dinner this was our quick service meal. Pool time until 90 minutes before fireworks then bus back to the park for Fireworks and magic hour...

    Comic books and reading books are what filled the times we had to spend in line. Short pocket books are the things that save us.

    Also avoiding the parks during the crazy afternoons. We love to use the pool and water slide at the hotel as a cool afternoon activity.

    We also spent Saturday away from Disney. Thats the day we go to Nasa, or the beach. We do something other then the park that day. It is to packed to get a lot of rides and so we go somewhere else.

    Our rule was when wait times got over 30 minutes it was time to head for the pool.

    It helped that we had 8 days at the park so we got to go to each one more than once. We also found that Boy's favorite ride was the monorail. Who knew we could of saved so much money by just staying at the hotel and riding the monorail and the boats. (just kidding he says he prefer Mine carts)
     

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