Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-26-2013, 11:44 AM   #31
Feralpeg
Diet coke lover
Can now visit the parks anytime
My DD, the movie star
Sean Bean...is he related to Mr. Bean?
 
Feralpeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Windermere, FL
Posts: 18,250

I don't believe Sandy has been forgotten. Unfortunately, there are so many terrible disasters happening, only so much attention can be focused on any one. My heart goes out to the people whose lives were turned upside down by Sandy and so many other natural disasters.
__________________
Feralpeg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 11:51 AM   #32
snarlingcoyote
I know people who live in really carpy school districts
 
snarlingcoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 5,641

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumbo4x4 View Post
I think we all know what's being said there. In most of these disasters, there are stories of self-reliance that come shining through. Katrina showed a disturbing lack of that - whether it was that the storm was just too overwhelming or the people ill prepared or some combination of both, it was starkly different from most storms.

To be certain, the refusal of local authorities to allow federal help, and then the federal help coming too slowly once it was authorized were shameful. But, the vicrims' total lack of preparedness and lack of self preservation - for whatever reasons - were eye opening to say the least.
I'll pass that on to some friends who had 12 family members living with them after the storm for a year. I'll let the entire towns that were devastated and, since they weren't NOLA, had to find their own missing, clear their own roads, and figure out how to get their own relief supplies that they weren't self-reliant. I'll be sure to inform the Mennonite teenagers from my hometown who showed up a week after Rita and cleaned my elderly parents yard so that they could get their cars in of their failings.

I'll make sure that the doctors who stayed with their patients and did unrelenting work at big charity in the most horrific situations know that they were lacking. I'll let a young man I know, who clawed his way through a roof with his bare hands, hauled his elderly, disabled grandmother up onto that roof and then dove into swirling flood waters to find a boat and get her safely into that boat and to safety that he was unprepared and lacking in self-preservation.

I'll make sure that someone my parents know, who came to their town in the pre-Katrina evacuations, and when she realized her house just wasn't there anymore, immediately (that day) went and put in job applications at every single store in town and started looking for a place to live long term that she isn't self-reliant.
__________________
Our family:
DH Me
Our menagerie:
snarlingcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 05-26-2013, 11:57 AM   #33
Lorelei Lee
DIS Veteran
 
Lorelei Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,637

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumbo4x4

I think we all know what's being said there. In most of these disasters, there are stories of self-reliance that come shining through. Katrina showed a disturbing lack of that - whether it was that the storm was just too overwhelming or the people ill prepared or some combination of both, it was starkly different from most storms.

To be certain, the refusal of local authorities to allow federal help, and then the federal help coming too slowly once it was authorized were shameful. But, the vicrims' total lack of preparedness and lack of self preservation - for whatever reasons - were eye opening to say the least.
But that's not what drives the media.

Sent from my SCH-I800 using DISBoards
Lorelei Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 12:07 PM   #34
Lorelei Lee
DIS Veteran
 
Lorelei Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,637

Quote:
Originally Posted by snarlingcoyote

I'll pass that on to some friends who had 12 family members living with them after the storm for a year. I'll let the entire towns that were devastated and, since they weren't NOLA, had to find their own missing, clear their own roads, and figure out how to get their own relief supplies that they weren't self-reliant. I'll be sure to inform the Mennonite teenagers from my hometown who showed up a week after Rita and cleaned my elderly parents yard so that they could get their cars in of their failings.

I'll make sure that the doctors who stayed with their patients and did unrelenting work at big charity in the most horrific situations know that they were lacking. I'll let a young man I know, who clawed his way through a roof with his bare hands, hauled his elderly, disabled grandmother up onto that roof and then dove into swirling flood waters to find a boat and get her safely into that boat and to safety that he was unprepared and lacking in self-preservation.

I'll make sure that someone my parents know, who came to their town in the pre-Katrina evacuations, and when she realized her house just wasn't there anymore, immediately (that day) went and put in job applications at every single store in town and started looking for a place to live long term that she isn't self-reliant.
Nicely put.

Around here in the aftermath of Sandy we saw the best of volunteer groups heading to the affected areas. But we also saw swift action by state and federal government.


To be sure we had our failures around here as well. LIPA was a total disgrace, people were without electricity for weeks after the storm.

A friend of mine -- the first floor of her home flooded during Sandy. She's living in the home, using only tge second floor -- all the debris has been removed but she hasn't started to rebuild yet. Issues are money (still waiting on her insurance company) and availability of labor and materials.

Sent from my SCH-I800 using DISBoards
Lorelei Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 12:10 PM   #35
Gumbo4x4
Note to the ladies who forgot to check - we don't mind. Signed, "The guys"
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 14,049

Quote:
Originally Posted by snarlingcoyote View Post
I'll pass that on to some friends who had 12 family members living with them after the storm for a year. I'll let the entire towns that were devastated and, since they weren't NOLA, had to find their own missing, clear their own roads, and figure out how to get their own relief supplies that they weren't self-reliant. I'll be sure to inform the Mennonite teenagers from my hometown who showed up a week after Rita and cleaned my elderly parents yard so that they could get their cars in of their failings.

I'll make sure that the doctors who stayed with their patients and did unrelenting work at big charity in the most horrific situations know that they were lacking. I'll let a young man I know, who clawed his way through a roof with his bare hands, hauled his elderly, disabled grandmother up onto that roof and then dove into swirling flood waters to find a boat and get her safely into that boat and to safety that he was unprepared and lacking in self-preservation.

I'll make sure that someone my parents know, who came to their town in the pre-Katrina evacuations, and when she realized her house just wasn't there anymore, immediately (that day) went and put in job applications at every single store in town and started looking for a place to live long term that she isn't self-reliant.
It's interesting in that you mention many areas outside NOLA where the "norm" actually did take place. And obviously much of it did within NOLA as well. HS classmate got wiped out in Bay St Louis, drove back to Missouri, filled his truck with medical supplies, then went right back.

My post wasnt intended as an insult to those who did what they could. But we all saw WAY too much of the opposite as well, and that's just what we saw on the news. And as someone who's down there, you should know that as well as anyone.
__________________
Gumbo4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 12:11 PM   #36
disd55
Mouseketeer
 
disd55's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 276

Not saying that Louisiana and Mississippi aren't densely populated, but they aren't as nearly densely populated as the Northeast Coast. The NYC Metro has a 22 million person population, and the world's largest rapid transit system. The New Orleans Metropolitan area has a population of less than 1.5 million. No electricity wreaked havoc on not just normal people in cold homes, but the Subway System. Without transit, especially to Southern Manhattan where Wall Street is, people couldn't get to work. This in turn effected the WHOLE country, even the world, as one of the world's biggest stock markets was closes for 2 days.
disd55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 01:09 PM   #37
novajeanjellybean
One day my prince will come........
 
novajeanjellybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 593

I also wanted to mention Hurricane Ike which also didn't garner a lot of long term media coverage. It took years for people to get their houses rebuilt/repaired and we were also without electricity for weeks. There was also the BP Oil Disaster that devastated the Gulf community. They are just now starting to recover from it and we wont know the long term affects to our health and the environment for years to come.
__________________
-Nova
novajeanjellybean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 02:01 PM   #38
snarlingcoyote
I know people who live in really carpy school districts
 
snarlingcoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 5,641

Quote:
Originally Posted by OceanAnnie View Post
It was stunning the lack of preparedness. There were warnings. I can still see all those buses underwater that could have been used to transport people. At the very least they should have been moved to higher ground to be saved.

Breathtakingly stunning. Also the lawlessness that abounded. Everything degenerated very quickly.
No, it was stunning how the media spun things.

I've forgotten the exact estimates, but the simulations run prior to Katrina all suggested that, in the filled bathtub situation NOLA faced in Katrina, a certain percentage of the population would be stuck in the city. The actual number that was in the city during/after Katrina was much lower, suggesting that a lot of people who reasonably could've been expected to have been stuck in Katrina managed to use their wits to get out of the city and to safety.

The problem, at that time, was in actually getting OUT of the city. There are only X number of roads leading out of any major city, and, unfortunately, good contra-flow plans had not been developed. It's not about the vehicles, it was about using those vehicles on overwhelmed roads.

Witness the mass chaos that happened in Houston in the time leading up to Rita. People were stuck in their cars for days because of transportation issues.

That is not excusing some really poor choices that were made pre-Katrina by FEMA and other governmental bodies in regards to evacuation and where supplies are stored. But really, I was impressed with just how many people without cars got out of the city!

(And there have lessons learned: I drove by one of the main storage/shelter facilities FEMA has built post-Katrina just yesterday. It's far enough away from the coast to only face tropical storm force winds, on good high ground, right next to an arena/coliseum type facility and a college, but out in the country. It's about 3 hours drive from the heart of NO or to Lake Chuck, maybe 1.5 hours to Layfayette and has close access to two different N/S arteries.)
__________________
Our family:
DH Me
Our menagerie:
snarlingcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 02:06 PM   #39
snarlingcoyote
I know people who live in really carpy school districts
 
snarlingcoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 5,641

Quote:
Originally Posted by disd55 View Post
Not saying that Louisiana and Mississippi aren't densely populated, but they aren't as nearly densely populated as the Northeast Coast. The NYC Metro has a 22 million person population, and the world's largest rapid transit system. The New Orleans Metropolitan area has a population of less than 1.5 million. No electricity wreaked havoc on not just normal people in cold homes, but the Subway System. Without transit, especially to Southern Manhattan where Wall Street is, people couldn't get to work. This in turn effected the WHOLE country, even the world, as one of the world's biggest stock markets was closes for 2 days.
In turn, I could cite specifics about how much goes in and out of the port of NOLA. . .

Face it, they were both bad.
__________________
Our family:
DH Me
Our menagerie:
snarlingcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 02:08 PM   #40
snarlingcoyote
I know people who live in really carpy school districts
 
snarlingcoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 5,641

Quote:
Originally Posted by novajeanjellybean View Post
I also wanted to mention Hurricane Ike which also didn't garner a lot of long term media coverage. It took years for people to get their houses rebuilt/repaired and we were also without electricity for weeks. There was also the BP Oil Disaster that devastated the Gulf community. They are just now starting to recover from it and we wont know the long term affects to our health and the environment for years to come.
While folks hit by Rita feel forgotten, the people who suffered from Ike were even more forgotten.
__________________
Our family:
DH Me
Our menagerie:
snarlingcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 02:18 PM   #41
Poohforyou
DIS Veteran
 
Poohforyou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 3,411

OP, I'm in NJ and completely disagree with you. However, I want to know how long you expect the rest of the country to stay focused on the impact of Sandy over 6 months after the storm?

Life goes on for people. Honestly, there are plenty of people here in NJ that don't think about Sandy on a daily or even weekly basis. If someone isn't personally impacted or sees the devastation on a daily basis it's easy to forget.
Poohforyou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 03:14 PM   #42
descovy
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 974

Just because we aren't talking about Sandy every day, it doesn't mean the whole country isn't aware or has forgotten.

I ask you, in the past when you heard of Andrew, Katrina, Ike, Rita, Gulf Spill, Joplin, floods in TN, etc., etc., what did you do? Were these storms most pressing in your day to day life 6 mos later? Did you actively seek out updates and info about these storm 6 months later? Or did your own local life capture your attention?

Just because you weren't actively talking about and seeking information about Hurricane Rita 6 months later, it didn't mean that you cared less than you did when you first heard it.

What are you asking for?

Are you asking for more attention than you gave when other tragic events happened around the country and around the world?

Lets face it, what happens in our own backyard is the most pressing to us. Sandy is top concern for you. Just as Ike was top concern for my family, and so on for others around the world.
descovy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 03:28 PM   #43
Aunt Cawa


Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Way too far from Anaheim and the Big A
Posts: 685

OP, if you are in NJ, how do you know what is and isn't being covered in other parts of the country? I live in NJ and read every day about Sandy in my newspaper. I am sorry if you were personally affected by the storm. Many people in the tristate area were affected, myself included. I just don't understand what your point is.
__________________
"The guy wearing the lampshade is seldom the brightest bulb, okay." Pepe the King Prawn
Aunt Cawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:00 PM   #44
Rafiki31
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 418

I think it is sad that this thread is disintegrating into a one up - ing of whose tragedy was worse. Shows what people really care about. Themselves and their own little world. I think media coverage is a poor indicator of what people care about. A lot of time you get media coverage way over doing it. They hop from one tragedy to the next.
Rafiki31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2013, 07:38 PM   #45
AntePrincess
Not a princess... yet.
 
AntePrincess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 886

Wow this thread took a turn. As a NJ native I can assure anyone that cares to pay attention that we had PLENTY of people who refused to evacuate and lots of our DIY 'self-reliant' types got themselves a nice case of carbon monoxide poisoning (or flat out died). Our own politicians were telling people to leave generator and electrical work to the professionals, to stay out of the water, and I can't think how many other hand-holding type PSAs. So much for self reliance.

So far as I'm considered, there's no such thing as an unworthy victim, whether they're rich or poor, black or white, Sandy victim or Katrina victim.
__________________
Filling the vacation jar & it's looking good!
AntePrincess is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:15 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

You Rated this Thread: