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Old 04-25-2013, 07:53 PM   #46
whgrn
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I didn't get much in the way of counseling before my GB. It's much more prevalent now than then. But I have done private counseling and have seen a nutritionist for years. Also was very involved in the post-op support group. Now I'm pretty much on "auto-pilot"--just check in with the doc every few years, get my labs done when needed, take my supplements, etc. But remember--I'm 12 years out. I've long since lost any of the honeymoon benefits of the surgery (other than the smaller stomach). I'm pretty much on my own. I think if you do all the counseling (psych and nutrition and lifestyle, etc.) early on, it help you when you're "flying solo" a decade or more out. Knowledge is power.
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Old 04-25-2013, 07:57 PM   #47
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My SIL had lapband surgery done in Mexico. She lost over 100 pounds and has kept about half of it off. I really think that she needed counseling and possibly psychiatric help. I think the eating was a symptom of a bigger problem. I believe she possibly has an alcohol and/or drug problem now.
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Old 04-25-2013, 08:51 PM   #48
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Ok, I'll admit I chose the title to get people's interest and responses. Not necessarily because I believe it.
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:15 PM   #49
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Bravo To all those people who posted about the surgery, Isn't an easy surgery to have done. When my mom had her surgery it was about a two year process lots of meetings and screenings to go through. Her insurance wouldn't cover it either, they saw it was cosmetic even though she was close to 200 pounds over what her "ideal" weight should be.
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:29 PM   #50
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My hairdresser was very heavy and had the surgery after a long time getting it approved by health care, she has heart issues. She lost the weight very fast, this was about 10 years ago. She had cosmetic surgery because of the loose skin and almost died in surgery. She's now almost just as heavy as before, she gained it all back. So it's not a miracle cure.
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:21 PM   #51
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Living life as a morbidly obese person is painful in every respect -- physically, emotionally, etc. I've struggled with my weight since I was a teen. At my highest weight in 2009, I weighed 368 pounds.

For me, weight was always the one thing I wasn't strong enough to tackle. I'm smart and successful -- blessed with a great husband, wonderful friends, a fulfilling job as an executive at a national company, a very comfortable financial situation and on and on.

In 2009, I had an "aha" moment and finally decided to take control. I joined Weight Watchers, and I lost 152 pounds in 18 months. I was 48 pounds from my goal weight when I got a great new job and moved to a new state. In 2011 and 2012, I regained 70 pounds -- the one thing I swore I'd never do.

Today, I'm back in control, back on Weight Watchers, and I've lost 22 of the 70 I regained. As it stands today, I'm 97 pounds from my goal weight. I know I'll get there, and I know I'll have to work and fight every day for the rest of my life to stay there.

This is a really long way to answer the original question about the need for surgery by simply saying -- the battle with weight for the morbidly obese is traumatic. I believe a person who is brave enough to face those demons and lose weight -- no matter whether through surgery, diet, exercise or some combination thereof -- should be supported and celebrated. I wouldn't wish obesity on my worst enemy, and I'm inspired every day by folks who are trying to change their lives one pound at a time.
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Old 04-26-2013, 12:45 AM   #52
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This is all depends on how quickly your body respond it, some people can maintain their weight after surgery and some people put on weight immediately. Best way is to exercise on regular basis with healthy diet.
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Old 04-26-2013, 01:21 AM   #53
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Congrats on your weight loss. That is great. I really mean it. Truly.

I just think that you are getting angry when people do question it. I can honestly say that I still don't understand how it worked for you to limit your portions through surgery- with the exception of feeling full- yet limiting portions didn't work without surgery. It's an honest question. There is no malice in that at all. What is it that made the surgery work but nothing else did? That is the real question. Why does the smaller portion size work post surgery but not before? I know a few people who have had WLS. It did not work for all of them. Some never really lost a lot of weight, some lost a lot and so far so good but their eating habits are terrible (not healthy) one died and never made it out of the hospital and one lost and gained it all back (again- not eating healthy). I am not judging. I simply don't get what the surgery does that healthy living doesn't.
Well then there is no point in anyone answering this post because you "just don't get it"

You simply can't empathize in anyway, end of discussion.

I have never had alcohol, drugs or smoking problems, however I can empathize with people who have those issues.

My husband is using Chantix, I guess I should hound him about how he should just be able to quit and how I don't understand how he started in the first place.
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Old 04-26-2013, 01:40 AM   #54
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I don't think it is necessarily bad but also don't think it is the best approach. My biggest issue with the surgery is that it only addresses one aspect of the cause of the patient's obesity...eating too much. It doesn't teach them what they should be eating, address any emotional or psychological issues such as comfort eating, and doesn't address other lifestyle factors.

Losing a lot of weight should take time and should come from a lot of lifestyle changes. If these lifestyle changes are all done and, more importantly, stuck with for the remainder of your life, I do think most people will lose weight without surgery and keep it off long term. If a patient wants to speed up the process with surgery they can but if they ignore all the other issues and expect the surgery to be a catch all they will almost certainly end up gaining all the weight back.
i think you really do not understand what happens before a major surgery such as lap band or partial gastrectomy. no one walks into their doctors office and gets this type of surgery without education/counseling. it would be unethical.
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Old 04-26-2013, 02:20 AM   #55
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My eating disorder was anorexia so I may be looking at the weight issue from a different perspective.
This is my take- some people have a food addiction and I think weight loss surgery is necessary. Others have medical conditions, such as PCOS that make it very hard to lose weight no matter how much dieting and exercise they do. I also think that no one should have the surgery without lots of counseling beforehand and then afterwards. In the case of the food addicts, they will never keep off the weight without getting to the core reason they overeat.
I also think that Medicaid and insurance should cover weight loss surgery because, in the long run, tons of money, not to mention lives, would be saved because many weight related health issues would never develop.
My heart goes out to anyone dealing with weight related issues. It's very hard for people who have never had this kind problem to truly understand the pain weight battlers go through. If it was easy, no one would have to deal with it.
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Old 04-26-2013, 06:59 AM   #56
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There is a documentary out there that BBC did called GUTS. In one part of it they explained that the stomach secretes a hormone that tells the brain you are hungry. Gastric Bypass cuts off the portion of the stomach that releases that hormone so your hunger is greatly reduced. I though that was really interesting and something I did not know before.
I saw that, too! I figure, then, that even though you have to eat the same way after the surgery as you would without it, it's the difference between eating less and feeling miserably hungry all the time, vs. eating less and feeling OK. The guy they interviewed seemed to be doing really well.
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:05 AM   #57
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i think you really do not understand what happens before a major surgery such as lap band or partial gastrectomy. no one walks into their doctors office and gets this type of surgery without education/counseling. it would be unethical.
I know what goes on before the surgery. I've spoken to people who've had it and read articles about it and the steps most people have to go through first. That doesn't mean all those steps have a positive long term effect on the patient. As has been shown in this thread sometimes it works for people because they make all of the lifestyle changes to compliment the surgery but sometimes it doesn't. If anyone gets any of the surgeries and doesn't make all of the other adjustments to their life it will not be a long-term success.
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:18 AM   #58
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Quote:
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I don't think it is necessarily bad but also don't think it is the best approach. My biggest issue with the surgery is that it only addresses one aspect of the cause of the patient's obesity...eating too much. It doesn't teach them what they should be eating, address any emotional or psychological issues such as comfort eating, and doesn't address other lifestyle factors.

Losing a lot of weight should take time and should come from a lot of lifestyle changes. If these lifestyle changes are all done and, more importantly, stuck with for the remainder of your life, I do think most people will lose weight without surgery and keep it off long term. If a patient wants to speed up the process with surgery they can but if they ignore all the other issues and expect the surgery to be a catch all they will almost certainly end up gaining all the weight back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarah4770 View Post
i think you really do not understand what happens before a major surgery such as lap band or partial gastrectomy. no one walks into their doctors office and gets this type of surgery without education/counseling. it would be unethical.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FireDancer View Post
I know what goes on before the surgery. I've spoken to people who've had it and read articles about it and the steps most people have to go through first. That doesn't mean all those steps have a positive long term effect on the patient. As has been shown in this thread sometimes it works for people because they make all of the lifestyle changes to compliment the surgery but sometimes it doesn't. If anyone gets any of the surgeries and doesn't make all of the other adjustments to their life it will not be a long-term success.
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:31 AM   #59
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The surgery only addresses one aspect of the overall issue. The surgery doesn't change habits, compulsions, or anything else. It doesn't force anyone to become more active. All the counseling in the world won't really address the other aspects either, only the patient can truly address those aspects themselves. Counseling can help them get to the issues but it on them to actually make all the other lifestyle changes and stick with them for the rest of their lives. It isn't like there is a history of patients telling counselors or psychiatrists want they want to hear as opposed to the truth.

Far too often those other issues are not addressed and the surgery only becomes a short-term band-aid that doesn't work long term. Of course sometimes those other issues are addressed and the surgery is a success. Every patient gets to decide for themselves if the surgery will be a new life or just a temporary respite.
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:57 AM   #60
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I have just been approved for the gastric sleeve. My entire family has made changes already, even though they are not the ones that needed them. We are eating much healthier at home and my oldest son is preparing to go to water aerobics classes with me as soon as school is out so it will help his back.

I have tried many many times to loose weight and something will happen with my health and send me spiraling and the weight will come right back on.

I first approached this with my primary dr and he agreed with my laundry list of medical problems at 37, that the surgery will greatly benifit me. My neurologist, neurosurgeon and cardiologist are also very supportive.

I am ready for this lifestyle change so I can really enjoy the kids while they are still young! I miss being the me I used to be.
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