Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Photography Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-23-2013, 11:29 AM   #1
JustAKid
DIS Veteran
 
JustAKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 891

Show me your pics of...

I'm back and forth with trying to figure out whether or not I should purchase myself a DSLR. Just when I think I've made my decision one way or another something happens to put me back on the fence.

My newest obsessive thought is: are DSLRs any better at taking pictures through glass? Say, at a zoo, aquarium, car, plane, etc. Is anyone willing to share their pictures of something taken through glass using a DSLR?

If not, anyone have any tips or tricks for shooting through glass either with a bridge camera, or a DSLR?

Thanks, folks!
__________________
DH - his brother, DBiL and Me - Plus 3 - DD(8) DD(6) DD(4)
JustAKid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 11:37 AM   #2
nbaresejr
Mouseketeer
 
nbaresejr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 277

I dont believe a DSLR is going to be any better then a point and shoot right out of the box for you.

The advantage to the DSLR is the ability to buy a Circular Polarizer and attach it to the lens. I have never done this before but have been told that using a CPL eliminates the reflections caused by glass.

I could be wrong on this, wait for others to respond before making a decision.
__________________
Visits: Every Summer as a kid up until the age of 16
Adult Visits: April 07- Wilderness Lodge, April 2008- Wilderness Lodge, July 2010 Disneyland, Dec 2010- CBR,, Oct 2011 CBR, April 2013 CBR
http://www.flickr.com/photos/57234495@N03/
nbaresejr is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 04-23-2013, 11:43 AM   #3
PythonFan888
DIS Veteran
 
PythonFan888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,081

Refelection, glare and focusing are your biggest concerns. I agree with the circular polarizer suggestion. Also try to place the camera as close as possible to the glass or stand a little to the side. Wear a dark shirt to minimize reflections. Use a fast enough shutter speed if you're in a moving vehicle.

Here's a shot taken through a monorail window (Nikon DSLR):


Space Mountain Reflected by Allen Castillo, on Flickr
__________________
My Flickr Photostream.

Last edited by PythonFan888; 04-23-2013 at 11:52 AM.
PythonFan888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 12:20 PM   #4
Gianna'sPapa
DIS Veteran
 
Gianna'sPapa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Elgin, Il.
Posts: 3,643

Here are three from the Seas. I did use the onboard flash for all three, but I tried to shoot from some angle so the reflection could not be seen. When shooting at museums (through the glass), I have used a CPL. The key is to remember it will slow your shutter speed down, so you have to compensate some way. That is the advantage of the DSLR. I have more tools in my tool bag to adjust to different situations. Can you get good images with a P & S and/or bridge camera? Of course! You just have to know the limitations of your equipment and how to adjust. This always seems to come back to the photographer, which is reiterated many times on this forum.


Yellow Fish by Terry McGraw Photography, on Flickr


Seas Blue Fish by Terry McGraw Photography, on Flickr


The Seas Spiny Fish 2008 by Terry McGraw Photography, on Flickr
Gianna'sPapa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 12:21 PM   #5
Pixel Dust
It's a trap!
 
Pixel Dust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 467

Just having a DSLR along is not going to help shooting through glass. A circular polarizer will help, though not eliminate it completely, and you lose a stop or so of light. Getting right up to the glass is also a good start. You need to block the source of the reflection all together.

The Lens Skirt fits over the lens and towards the glass. They have before/after photos on their site.
http://www.lenskirt.com/

Here's a DIY solution.
http://petapixel.com/2013/04/08/flec...through-glass/

The DIY might be a good solution for those with a point-and-shoot, as you can make it smaller for your camera size.
__________________
Franklin and Missy -- Check us out on Facebook!
Trip Reports: All You Need is The Force, Trust and Pixie Dust! 05/2014
Wait! Where's your wedding ring? 10/2013 ; Food, friendship, flowers and a touch of the Force 05/2013 ; A Disney Geek-tastic Trip to the World 01/2013 ; Happily Ever After Begins Here 10/2012 ; Peekaboo, I see Pluto! A 1st Birthday TR 3/2012 ; Boo to Two 10/2011 ; A Failure to Launch 10/2010

02/09-Mariott Imperial Palms, 10/10-Mystic Dunes, 10/11-CR, 03/12-Windsor Hills, 10/12-BCV/AKV, 01/13-BWV, 05/13-BLT, 10/13-YC, 05/14-BWV, 08/14-VGF, 12/14-BWV, 04/15-BLT

Nikon D600
Nikkor 24-120mm f/4 ED VR ; Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 G ; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ; Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 ; Nikon SB-800 ; Manfrotto 055CXPRO4 Tripod
Pixel Dust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 02:44 PM   #6
capt445
Mouseketeer
 
capt445's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Indiana
Posts: 404

Here are a couple taken through the glass at the FT. Wayne Childrens Zoon in Indiana. No flash and no filter.

_DSC0194 by capt445, on Flickr


_DSC8568 by capt445, on Flickr
__________________
me dw dddd
capt445 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 07:51 AM   #7
PrincessInOz
in
Catch you at the other end
 
PrincessInOz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 86,356

Ocean Park in Hong Kong


















One of the Zoo's in Melbourne.
























Taken with a dSLR. As the others have said, get your lens as close to the glass as possible. Try using your body to block out the light from behind you. I also try to angle the lens up/down a little as I find it does cut down on the glare and reflection.
__________________

Disneyland - Dec 1986, May 1990, Dec 1997, Aug 2003, Jun 2005, Jul 2007 TR, Nov 2008, Jan 2011 and Nov 2012 Another Mad Dash TR
Walt Disney World - Jun 2005, May 2010 (POR, BCV) PTR || TR, Oct 2010 (CSR) PTR || TR, Oct 2013 Anyone Game? PTR || TR in progress
Hong Kong Disneyland - Mar/Apr 2012 TR
PrincessInOz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 09:29 AM   #8
zackiedawg
WEDway Peoplemover Rider
 
zackiedawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Boca Raton, FL
Posts: 2,784

Shooting through glass is generally more about technique than camera. A DSLR will have some advantages over P&S, but not specifically to do with glass in the way, and more to do with typical DSLR advantages in general, like shallower depth of field, higher ISO capability to allow faster shutter speeds in low light, and ability to change lenses as needed for conditions and scene.

Shooting through glass as mentioned above is more about getting the lens as close to the glass as possible, blocking out as much stray reflection as possible via lens hood or sealing hands around lens end, wearing dark colors to avoid your own reflections, using circular polarizers to cut down reflection, and post processing to restore contrast and color loss that may result with thicker glass. Learn the technique, and the camera is less important...choosing a DSLR or a P&S is the bigger picture - whether a DSLR will be something you're ready for or not. DSLRs and mirrorless large-sensor cameras have clear advantages over P&S cameras, but not everyone is going to take shots that 'require' DSLRs or will really take advantage of the abilities, and there are as always compromises to going to a DSLR which you need to decide if you're ready for (namely, weight, size, and cost!). Will your photography benefit from a DSLR? Only you will know! But shooting through glass can be done with P&S or DSLR, using the right techniques.

Shot through glass with a 1/2.5" sensor P&S:




Shot through glass with a DSLR:


__________________
zackiedawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 09:34 AM   #9
wiigirl
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15,974

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pixel Dust View Post
Just having a DSLR along is not going to help shooting through glass. A circular polarizer will help, though not eliminate it completely, and you lose a stop or so of light. Getting right up to the glass is also a good start. You need to block the source of the reflection all together.

The Lens Skirt fits over the lens and towards the glass. They have before/after photos on their site.
http://www.lenskirt.com/

Here's a DIY solution.
http://petapixel.com/2013/04/08/flec...through-glass/

The DIY might be a good solution for those with a point-and-shoot, as you can make it smaller for your camera size.

One of the best investments I have made recently.
__________________
For the love of Disney...
wiigirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:29 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

You Rated this Thread: