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Old 03-12-2013, 02:45 PM   #16
Robbi
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My parents sent my brothers and then my husband and I sent our younger son to boarding school for a couple of reasons- superior education and because they wanted to go. Our older son had the opportunity as did our daughter but they chose not to go. Instead they attended the local private schools.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:25 PM   #17
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Great spinoff thread. Based solely on my experiences with boarding school kids (including five of my eight college roommates), a top boarding school is generally in a whole different league academically than even a top private day school. An example: Groton has a four-year programs in both Greek and Latin. I knew Groton kids who got to college and could read the Aeneid in native tongue and could function in virtually any Romance language, thanks to years of Latin. Several of them became classicists in academia, which was made a lot easier by the fact that they didn't first encounter Greek in college. Deerfield offers math straight through multivariable calculus and into linear algebra. Imagine what a huge advantage that is when you walk into MIT as an engineering freshman - to be that far ahead in math. This is all entirely par for the course at boarding schools, which tend to have generous endowments and are able to hire on teachers in niche subjects for small groups of kids. They don't have to operate to the median and they don't answer to local taxpayers.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:31 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caradana View Post
Great spinoff thread. Based solely on my experiences with boarding school kids (including five of my eight college roommates), a top boarding school is generally in a whole different league academically than even a top private day school. An example: Groton has a four-year programs in both Greek and Latin. I knew Groton kids who got to college and could read the Aeneid in native tongue and could function in virtually any Romance language, thanks to years of Latin. Several of them became classicists in academia, which was made a lot easier by the fact that they didn't first encounter Greek in college. Deerfield offers math straight through multivariable calculus and into linear algebra. Imagine what a huge advantage that is when you walk into MIT as an engineering freshman - to be that far ahead in math. This is all entirely par for the course at boarding schools, which tend to be incredibly well endowed and able to hire on teachers in niche subjects for small groups of kids.
Yes and no. True genius cannot be taught. And the majority of the late geniuses have figured out pretty early that they do not need college. See Zuckerberg, Gates, Jobs, Dell. And even the old guys like Ford and Edison.

If you are going to boarding school for the sole reason to get into a top college so be it. But the real geniuses let the schools come to them.

Again, my brother is a Deerfield graduate. He however, was there solely for his athletic abilities. The school does not make the person.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:36 PM   #19
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Let's see... Everything I learned about boarding school I learned from the Facts of Life.

Jo was sent to get her out of a tough neighborhood (got a scholarship)

Blair's parents were the wealthy jet-set type.

Tootie's parents wanted more for her than the local schools could give.

Natalie's parents... I think they just wanted more for her, but they also used the school to cover their marital problems and divorce.

There was a kid on there who was a diplomat's daughter, sent so the parents could travel and she could have some root (she committed suicide anyway).

Wasn't SueAnn mostly sent for athletic reasons?

Pretty standard reasons, I guess. Who says you can't learn anything from TV?
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:51 PM   #20
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Why would I consider it for my DD?

I think she would thrive on the structure and the academic focus and in being around others who are also more academically focused. Also, she does not fit well in Germany and might be happier back in the US and it is not possible for us to more back there at this point.

(the reasons we are NOT sending her are that she is not comfortable eing away from home that much at this age and she has a lot of anxiety and some social issues and we feel it is better for her to work on focusing LESS on academic achievement, and more on learning when to let things slide and on socializing in a variety of situations and with a variety of types of people in order for to lead a happier and more healthy life; and there is always the cost issue as well )

I also know people who do it for who their kids will meet and have connections to, because they (the parents) travel a lot, because the kids have special needs an the school does more for that then typical day schools, so that their child will develop more independence, and some who simply do not want to be bothered to parent (but that is the vast minority of boarding school parents in my experience).
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:53 PM   #21
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I greatly dislike my children. That's why!
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:19 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disneefun View Post
Let's see... Everything I learned about boarding school I learned from the Facts of Life.

Jo was sent to get her out of a tough neighborhood (got a scholarship)

Blair's parents were the wealthy jet-set type.

Tootie's parents wanted more for her than the local schools could give.

Natalie's parents... I think they just wanted more for her, but they also used the school to cover their marital problems and divorce.

There was a kid on there who was a diplomat's daughter, sent so the parents could travel and she could have some root (she committed suicide anyway).

Wasn't SueAnn mostly sent for athletic reasons?

Pretty standard reasons, I guess. Who says you can't learn anything from TV?
This is why I wanted to go
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:13 PM   #23
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Personally I cannot imagine sending my children to boarding school,but each to their own.

My dad actually went to a boarding school for the last few years of his education,but got sent away,as he was a bit of a naughty boy

The only other people I know who attended boarding school were a family where the dad worked overseas,and the mom travelled with him.
They were indeed very wealthy,kids were in boarding school from beginning to end of their educations.
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:49 PM   #24
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I went to college with a lot of oil brats, and many of them went to boarding schools (especially the girls) because of the volatile political climate in the Middle East, where their fathers were assigned.

These folks were not executives; they were mostly geologists and drilling engineers, and so the boarding schools that their kids attended were not the really prestigious ones like Choate or Deerfield; mostly they were run by religious orders. The ones that I was most familiar with at the time were the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Grand Coteau, LA (which is the oldest girls' boarding school west of the Mississippi still in continuous operation, founded in 1821), and St. Stanislaus College in Bay St. Louis, MS. Both of them also had day students, so there was a mix of economic circumstances. (Being a day student at either one of these schools is still very affordable; much less than I pay at a diocesan high school in the midwest.) They are both excellent schools, IMO, but they are probably not going to give you any kind of leg up in a career in investment banking or international diplomacy.

For the most part, I think that parents with really mobile careers are still the primary drivers for attendance at US boarding schools at large, but that family tradition is probably still the primary driver at the very elite schools here.

I currently live near a very unusual boarding school that also takes local day students. All classes are taught seminar-style and independent study is very heavily emphasized; the total enrollment Gr.7-12 is 91 students, and most of them are not from the US.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:21 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caradana View Post
Great spinoff thread. Based solely on my experiences with boarding school kids (including five of my eight college roommates), a top boarding school is generally in a whole different league academically than even a top private day school. An example: Groton has a four-year programs in both Greek and Latin. I knew Groton kids who got to college and could read the Aeneid in native tongue and could function in virtually any Romance language, thanks to years of Latin. Several of them became classicists in academia, which was made a lot easier by the fact that they didn't first encounter Greek in college. Deerfield offers math straight through multivariable calculus and into linear algebra. Imagine what a huge advantage that is when you walk into MIT as an engineering freshman - to be that far ahead in math. This is all entirely par for the course at boarding schools, which tend to have generous endowments and are able to hire on teachers in niche subjects for small groups of kids. They don't have to operate to the median and they don't answer to local taxpayers.
While I appreciate your passion for boarding schools I personally think your perception is skewed. Of course like all of us we form our opinions based on our life experiences. That being said, I don't think learning latin is that big of a draw for me for my children. My FIL speaks fluent latin. Who does he speak it to? No one. Why? Because I have yet to meet a person who speaks latin in every day life. Was it good to learn? Sure. Any second language is good to learn. I took French and Italian in public school. I also took Greek in college. I was not an engineering major- I just liked languages. I still do.
As far as boarding schools being so far ahead of the public schools, well, I disagree. Just like public schools not all boarding schools are the same. Many charge a lot but it is all smoke and mirrors and they are riding on the reputation of the families that send their kids there. Many public schools are amazing. We are happy with our district. They are a competitive and offer a lot for the children. I know many children not only in my district but in others that have gone on to top schools. In fact, it seems pretty normal for any child that is an overachiever.
Foe me- I would not send my children to boarding school. While education is paramount to us, family is even more important. We want our children to excel academically but we also want them to value their family. For us, family traditions and daily events together are part of what makes you into the person that you are. We do not want any disconnect from that. That has the highest value to us. You can always make money and yes, it can make certain aspects of your life easier, but having that family there is imo more important. JMHO.
Oh- and there is no way in the world we would ever want to be away from our kids like that.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:29 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Disneefun View Post
Let's see... Everything I learned about boarding school I learned from the Facts of Life.

Jo was sent to get her out of a tough neighborhood (got a scholarship)

Blair's parents were the wealthy jet-set type.

Tootie's parents wanted more for her than the local schools could give.

Natalie's parents... I think they just wanted more for her, but they also used the school to cover their marital problems and divorce.

There was a kid on there who was a diplomat's daughter, sent so the parents could travel and she could have some root (she committed suicide anyway).

Wasn't SueAnn mostly sent for athletic reasons?

Pretty standard reasons, I guess. Who says you can't learn anything from TV?
Best post of the day! Lol!
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:31 PM   #27
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A guy I grew up with married a boarding school girl he met in college. He quickly immersed himself in a life that was a 180 from his old life. Both he and his wife work 60+ hours per week. They had a live in nanny and ship the kids off to camp for 6-8 weeks every summer. He did talk his wife into letting the kids stay home during the school year until 8th grade and paid for private school. The deal was if they didn't get into a NYC public high school of their choice, then they go to boarding school for high school. The oldest didn't get in to the one he wanted, so he is now in boarding school a few states away.
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