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Old 03-08-2013, 04:42 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Casemily View Post
I took it that way because mainly I've never heard of a diet consisting of only pb and j and nothing else. I did not know it was healthy enough to only ever eat pb and j. Plus, if I was allergic to peanuts like the op, I'd like the option to be rebooked on another flight if I knew someone else had to eat peanuts on the flight I was on. I didn't originally read where the person with the peanut allergy would be forewarned prior to take off and given the option not to fly with you. That's why I took it "any other way". No offense meant, just explaining how I interpreted your words, which I'm sure others may have as well.


That's the problem. As I said, we've never been on a peanut free flight, but there's no way we would know ahead of time either if they don't announce it until everyone is on the plane. My son does not "just" eat pb&j sandwiches but Peanut Butter IS the only protein he can eat. BTW Peanut Butter is a perfectly healthy option. He would not be able to make a long flight without eating and he can't just have cookies or pretzels. He does have to have the protein with every meal. It's no fun living with a disability and we are constantly making concessions. I'm sorry but feeding my child can't be one of them.

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Old 03-08-2013, 05:08 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Casemily View Post
I took it that way because mainly I've never heard of a diet consisting of only pb and j and nothing else. I did not know it was healthy enough to only ever eat pb and j. Plus, if I was allergic to peanuts like the op, I'd like the option to be rebooked on another flight if I knew someone else had to eat peanuts on the flight I was on. I didn't originally read where the person with the peanut allergy would be forewarned prior to take off and given the option not to fly with you. That's why I took it "any other way". No offense meant, just explaining how I interpreted your words, which I'm sure others may have as well.
There are conditions which severely limit the food a person is able to consume that can be carried in a carry on with no refrigeration for several hours. When you have to feed an autistic child who is suddenly in a new situation where he has little control and no room to move and all the sensory stimuli of the plane, there is very little chance he will suddenly allow you to change his routine even further and hand him turkey instead of PB&J. So, yes, there are some disabilities which result in a never-changing diet.

I think the point of the other poster was to alert the OP that there may be others with disabilities on board who require a meal, and if they were not told until they are on the plane they cannot eat the only meal they brought, they may not have a lot of options.

There is no way of gauging who has a "worse" disability. The best everyone can do it be polite and work out the situation as it arises. The person with the peanut allergy must be protected, but you cannot have the solution simply be "Let the child go hungry" if that person has a disability or medical need as well.

The best anyone can do is plan ahead as much as possible. Request a peanut free flight, ask the desk attendant to make an announcement BEFORE boarding, so people in the terminal have a chance to acquire other snacks if they wish, bring food that is tree nut and pea nut free (most common airborne allergies) if possible, etc.

There is no way to plan for every exception possible and every airline does things differently. Just be sure to make your needs, whatever they may be, known to the airline as early as possible.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:09 PM   #33
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I like Jet Blue, Air Tran, and Frontier because they don't serve peanuts. Delta is usually OK and I won't do Southwest at all personally. The problem with the announcement is that it's usually made after take off and it seems like most eat as soon as they sit down. I rarely have had a flight without someone eating nuts. When on a plane esp airlines that routinely serve nuts I assume pretty much any surface is unsafe and I avoid eating during the flight because there is no way to be sure my hands are clean. Besides not caring a lot of people just are ignorant and don't realize most granola bars are chock full of nuts, etc. It's tougher on a plane because you can't avoid it. Everywhere else I just go on the assumption that I need to take care of myself in terms of cleaning things off, washing hands, etc. The whole nut free school thing is often a false sense of security unless it's explained and enforced. People just don't realize.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:16 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by KPeveler View Post
There are conditions which severely limit the food a person is able to consume that can be carried in a carry on with no refrigeration for several hours. When you have to feed an autistic child who is suddenly in a new situation where he has little control and no room to move and all the sensory stimuli of the plane, there is very little chance he will suddenly allow you to change his routine even further and hand him turkey instead of PB&J. So, yes, there are some disabilities which result in a never-changing diet.

I think the point of the other poster was to alert the OP that there may be others with disabilities on board who require a meal, and if they were not told until they are on the plane they cannot eat the only meal they brought, they may not have a lot of options.

There is no way of gauging who has a "worse" disability. The best everyone can do it be polite and work out the situation as it arises. The person with the peanut allergy must be protected, but you cannot have the solution simply be "Let the child go hungry" if that person has a disability or medical need as well.

The best anyone can do is plan ahead as much as possible. Request a peanut free flight, ask the desk attendant to make an announcement BEFORE boarding, so people in the terminal have a chance to acquire other snacks if they wish, bring food that is tree nut and pea nut free (most common airborne allergies) if possible, etc.

There is no way to plan for every exception possible and every airline does things differently. Just be sure to make your needs, whatever they may be, known to the airline as early as possible.

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Old 03-08-2013, 08:18 PM   #35
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I implied no such thing. My child isn't eating pb because it's all he wants, it's all he can eat. That isn't a "screw you", it's a fact. We would move as far away as possible but he also has a disability and has to eat. By your assuming standards, then the person with an allergy would be implying "screw you" to his needs. Neither of those are true. I posted about my son's needs so that the OP would understand that they might not be the only person with a medical condition on the plane and that even though peanut snacks aren't served they could very well still be on the plane. I have no idea why you took it any other way.
Your reaction is really one of the rare cases where it's not just a complete disregard for others. This is a topic that comes up a lot, here and on elsewhere online. This thread has been very tame, but the "screw you" sort of attitude comes up a lot. I'm sure you get it enough to understand the feeling.
I bet you get your fair share of people who want to demand a situation is peanut free for their needs, then act like you have no right to ask for respect for your needs. The situation is complicated and requires compromise but most people who insist on nuts just want them because they feel like it, it's a free country, I can eat what I want, etc. THAT is when it is sad. They are the same people who would probably try to sneak your son a chicken wing because "he's being too picky."
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:15 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by KPeveler

There are conditions which severely limit the food a person is able to consume that can be carried in a carry on with no refrigeration for several hours. When you have to feed an autistic child who is suddenly in a new situation where he has little control and no room to move and all the sensory stimuli of the plane, there is very little chance he will suddenly allow you to change his routine even further and hand him turkey instead of PB&J. So, yes, there are some disabilities which result in a never-changing diet.

I think the point of the other poster was to alert the OP that there may be others with disabilities on board who require a meal, and if they were not told until they are on the plane they cannot eat the only meal they brought, they may not have a lot of options.

There is no way of gauging who has a "worse" disability. The best everyone can do it be polite and work out the situation as it arises. The person with the peanut allergy must be protected, but you cannot have the solution simply be "Let the child go hungry" if that person has a disability or medical need as well.

The best anyone can do is plan ahead as much as possible. Request a peanut free flight, ask the desk attendant to make an announcement BEFORE boarding, so people in the terminal have a chance to acquire other snacks if they wish, bring food that is tree nut and pea nut free (most common airborne allergies) if possible, etc.

There is no way to plan for every exception possible and every airline does things differently. Just be sure to make your needs, whatever they may be, known to the airline as early as possible.
You raise some excellent points here!!
But if you read South West's own website they cannot/will not guarantee a completely 100% peanut free environment. So if you cannot accept those terms, they probably are not the right carrier for you (general you with the peanut allergy) to fly. You can only be responsible for your own actions & reactions to others. You cannot dictate how others act or behave. Whether you disagree or not, think it's right or wrong, SW says the other guests have the right to bring on and consume peanut products.
And also, not to be rude here but airport food is NOT cheap. Some people don't budget extra to have to buy more food at the airport when they have packed it. I know that sounds heartless and cruel and isn't meant to...but why should should someone else incur extra expenses? That isn't really fair to other travellers. JMHO... again...you can only take responsibility for your own actions/choices so if it is that much of a problem, I would think twice about my travel arrangements.
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:52 PM   #37
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You raise some excellent points here!!
But if you read South West's own website they cannot/will not guarantee a completely 100% peanut free environment. So if you cannot accept those terms, they probably are not the right carrier for you (general you with the peanut allergy) to fly. You can only be responsible for your own actions & reactions to others. You cannot dictate how others act or behave. Whether you disagree or not, think it's right or wrong, SW says the other guests have the right to bring on and consume peanut products.
And also, not to be rude here but airport food is NOT cheap. Some people don't budget extra to have to buy more food at the airport when they have packed it. I know that sounds heartless and cruel and isn't meant to...but why should should someone else incur extra expenses? That isn't really fair to other travellers. JMHO... again...you can only take responsibility for your own actions/choices so if it is that much of a problem, I would think twice about my travel arrangements.
I was very much hesitating to jump into this one because last time this came up I got flamed for my opinion. But what I highlighted in red in this PP post was the point I was trying to make in that other thread (from who knows when). Regardless or whether or not it's right or wrong or who's sicker than who or whatever, if the issue is that severe its probably time to reconsider the arrangements. It's just unrealistic to expect every person on a flight to avoid fill in whatever allergen here. It will never be realistic unless they were to make it a law and practically strip search everyone who walks on the plane for any traces of the allergen, and that won't happen because there's always going to be other transportation options. They may be less convenient but they still exist.
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Old 03-09-2013, 09:23 AM   #38
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The flight did serve snacks. And I'm sorry if they had only brought pb&j along for their child, but if so they shouldn't have fed it to them. Better their child go hungry than risk a passenger have a mid air emergency, and the plane be forced to land. They are fortunate it didn't come to that.
How do you know the child didn't have a medical condition requiring the child to eat. Could be it wasn't a matter of hunger but low blood sugar or another such problem. Why are people always critical of others when they do not know there issues? Someone with a peanut allergy shouldn't trump others with medical issues that need to be addressed.
Just thought I would add I have allergies to cashews, mango, dairy products and shellfish as well as having diabetes. Peanut butter and cracker is frequently my go to when I have low blood sugar because I need both carbs and protein. Carbs bring it up and protein to keep it up. Meat and fish are risky when travelling and crackers and cheese or carbs and milk are not an option.
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:01 PM   #39
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How do you know the child didn't have a medical condition requiring the child to eat. Could be it wasn't a matter of hunger but low blood sugar or another such problem. Why are people always critical of others when they do not know there issues? Someone with a peanut allergy shouldn't trump others with medical issues that need to be addressed.
I don't know and that is a good point. I am just going by that post, and no mention was made of the person who ingested the PB having some sort of allergy, or medical need of it. I would think that if I had a child that needed to eat PB, and it unintentionally caused another person to have a medical emergency, I would come forward and explain why I had fed my child the PB, even after being told not to.
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Old 03-09-2013, 02:05 PM   #40
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Sorry, but it's inconsiderate to expect a child not to eat on a flight just because of one with allergies. I know, I know, I don't understand what's it's like. I only have lactose intolerence.

I think anyone who has that extreme a view should announce the allergy well in advance so other passengers can find other food before boarding. I would be very peeved to take a sandwich onboard as my lunch and then find I couldn't have it and there's no other food on board.
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Old 03-09-2013, 02:55 PM   #41
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Sorry, but it's inconsiderate to expect a child not to eat on a flight just because of one with allergies. I know, I know, I don't understand what's it's like. I only have lactose intolerence.

I think anyone who has that extreme a view should announce the allergy well in advance so other passengers can find other food before boarding. I would be very peeved to take a sandwich onboard as my lunch and then find I couldn't have it and there's no other food on board.
As I stated before though... I'm sorry, and I know it may sound mean or cruel and I don't mean for it to, but it is not fair nor reasonable for someone else to expect others to incur additional expenses because of their 'issues'. Not everyone is traveling for vacation. Not everyone has 'extra' $$ to spend on costly airport food because of someone else's allergies. And even if they are travelling for vacation, you don't know how long they have skrimped and saved for that vacation and it is not someone else's 'right' to dictate how they should spend their additional funds. I think this does come back to if this is that extreme of an issue maybe it is time to rethink your travel arrangements. There are other modes of transportation. While they may not be as convenient or what 'you want', they may provide you the SAFETY you need!
I guess that is what I do like about SW...they won't allow a peanut allergy person's needs to trump another person's needs... say the diabetic who needs to eat the peanut butter crackers... They both have equal rights!

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I was very much hesitating to jump into this one because last time this came up I got flamed for my opinion. But what I highlighted in red in this PP post was the point I was trying to make in that other thread (from who knows when). Regardless or whether or not it's right or wrong or who's sicker than who or whatever, if the issue is that severe its probably time to reconsider the arrangements. It's just unrealistic to expect every person on a flight to avoid fill in whatever allergen here. It will never be realistic unless they were to make it a law and practically strip search everyone who walks on the plane for any traces of the allergen, and that won't happen because there's always going to be other transportation options. They may be less convenient but they still exist.
EXACTLY!!!

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I don't know and that is a good point. I am just going by that post, and no mention was made of the person who ingested the PB having some sort of allergy, or medical need of it. I would think that if I had a child that needed to eat PB, and it unintentionally caused another person to have a medical emergency, I would come forward and explain why I had fed my child the PB, even after being told not to.
bolding is mine...
And on the SW flights I have been on they have just announced that they will not be serving peanuts, they have not announced that you cannot consume them! They may have one one or two of them asked that anyone within a certain # of rows of 'said allergic person' please not consume peanut products or if they needed to please ask to move. But they did not declare that it was going to be a peanut free environment.
Sorry, but I don't owe anyone any explanation about my medical conditions.
If it is a SW flight, you are informed it is not guaranteed to be 100% peanut free. That is the chance you are taking when you choose to fly them. Again, not meant as rudeness...if you choose to share that info, it is fine, but others who choose not to share that should not be considered rude, that is personal information and people know the inherent risks when they chose to fly.
What amazes me is that someone would expect people to BUY different food! I guess I just don't expect the world to revolve around ME! I don't expect other people to stop their lives to meet MY needs when it comes to costing them money. That part just astounds me...
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Old 03-09-2013, 06:35 PM   #42
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I don't know, but it kind of astounds me that someone would inadvertently cause another person to have a medical emergency, and not step forward and explain why they did what they did. In part so others knew you were not just being a selfish jerk, but had a good reason for your actions.

If someone doesn't have a medical need of peanut butter, I can't understand why it is such a big deal to fly with another food item. Really? It comes off as being selfish and standing up for your rights when it isn't necessary, when it is just as easy to be kind and considerate of others and their needs. I wouldn't take only PB for food on a long flight, just as I wouldn't stinky food or hose myself down with perfume before boarding.

Being considerate of others shouldn't be so hard.
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Old 03-09-2013, 07:16 PM   #43
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I don't know, but it kind of astounds me that someone would inadvertently cause another person to have a medical emergency, and not step forward and explain why they did what they did. In part so others knew you were not just being a selfish jerk, but had a good reason for your actions.

I dunno... if I am doing what is both allowed and necessary for the well-being of my disabled child, I think she has the right to some privacy. I *don't* feel that making someone else feel better about my actions trumps my daughter's dignity and announcing her disability could be humiliating for her as she gets older. If the choice is a stranger thinking I'm a jerk when I'm not and strangers knowing private things about my kid... well, selfish would be making her take the hit, KWIM?

If the parent of an autistic/sensory/diabetic kid needs to feed their child the food the child will eat that will keep them safe and healthy (Ever seen a 9 year old autie trash a room because the snack didn't come when he needed it to? Imagine it in close quarters...) then it really feels unfair to ask them to hurt their kid or explain their choice not to do so. Peanut allergies are not the trump card of disabilites. I will bend over backwards to help where I reasonably can but when it comes to my kid vs. strangers and we're within the rules... my job is to protect my kid.

Air flight is almost never an absolute necessity. There's a point at which if other people existing and minding their own business on a plane is life-threatening to you, the person who needs to reconsider their plans... is you. If being on the plane with peanuts could make you die and you don't NEED to be on the plane, maybe the responsible thing to do is to keep yourself safe and make other travel arrangements. I'm a big fan of reasonable accommodations, but there is a level of personal accountability that needs to be in play too.

For the OP, you might find you generate a fair bit of goodwill and co-operation if you inform those around you of the issue and pass out a nice alternative snack "in appreciation for the inconvenience." It's a good move to both be considerate of those around you and to suddenly be seated in the middle of allies.
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Old 03-09-2013, 07:59 PM   #44
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If the parent of an autistic/sensory/diabetic kid needs to feed their child the food the child will eat that will keep them safe and healthy (Ever seen a 9 year old autie trash a room because the snack didn't come when he needed it to? Imagine it in close quarters...) then it really feels unfair to ask them to hurt their kid or explain their choice not to do so. Peanut allergies are not the trump card of disabilites. I will bend over backwards to help where I reasonably can but when it comes to my kid vs. strangers and we're within the rules... my job is to protect my kid.

Air flight is almost never an absolute necessity. There's a point at which if other people existing and minding their own business on a plane is life-threatening to you, the person who needs to reconsider their plans... is you. If being on the plane with peanuts could make you die and you don't NEED to be on the plane, maybe the responsible thing to do is to keep yourself safe and make other travel arrangements. I'm a big fan of reasonable accommodations, but there is a level of personal accountability that needs to be in play too.
Are you seriously suggesting that a person who at any moment could flip and become a danger to everybody near them should be given priority to ride planes vs. somebody who doesn't want you to kill them by exposing them to peanut butter? Because that seems to be what you are directly saying.
Are you listening to yourself? Just so it's out there, if you are boarding an airplane with a person who is a known risk to the others around them, you are certainly NOT within the rules.

Your suggestion that people with allergies shouldn't ride a plane because it may inconvenience somebody can just as easily be applied to the person who has any sort of condition that causes any mental or emotional instability.

As for Stitchlovestink's comment about people's "issues" we are not talking about somebody just wanting you to not eat it, the topic is people who could actually die because of it. This is not a preference thing, or a "I'm going to throw a fit if you don't give me what I want" thing... you could kill somebody and you are talking about it like it's not your problem- so you don't care if you kill somebody on purpose? Yes, knowing you could kill somebody by doing an activity then immediately doing it anyways would mean you intentionally killed them, not just that some person randomly died from some coincidence.
I am amazed that you would intentionally do something knowing you could kill somebody and have the attitude "well, I'm within the rules so it's their problem." Really?

Being legally within the law does not mean something is actually right. That sort of attitude about disabilities is why we have laws to protect people. It is going to be pretty inconvenient for people like that when allergies sufferers start getting more protections.
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Old 03-09-2013, 08:15 PM   #45
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DD has lots of allergies, and whenever we travel, we make sure her EpiPen handy. Her allergist has offered to give her pre-emptive allergy medication or shots just to make sure she doesn't have a reaction. Luckily we haven't needed it yet, but did have a scary event one time on DCL.
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