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Old 03-02-2013, 06:06 AM   #1
dis2cruise
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Custom Orthotics purchasing them online?

My foot dr. Want $450 for these and they're Not covered by insurance. Just wondering if anyone has done this before and how do they compare to the ones that a dr. Would get?
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Old 03-02-2013, 06:13 AM   #2
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My foot dr. Want $450 for these and they're Not covered by insurance. Just wondering if anyone has done this before and how do they compare to the ones that a dr. Would get?
I don't know but I have a foot saga of my own that I am currently going through. I am going the other direction and going "barefoot" or "minimalist shoes".

I have got plantar fascitiis and possibly tendonitis? Still working on a diagnosis.

I would check around to chain stores personally. You can get custom orthotics made for you from many places. Did he give you the prescription? Shop around for sure. Not sure if I would do online though. A person in a store you would see would be a CERTIFIED PEDORTHIST.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:48 AM   #3
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I have been battling plantar fasciitis since September *because of* barefoot shoes. Be very careful because you could make your PF much worse. I've been Powerstep inserts in my shoes, and it's slowly getting better. A night splint helped, as well.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:55 AM   #4
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I have been battling plantar fasciitis since September *because of* barefoot shoes. Be very careful because you could make your PF much worse. I've been Powerstep inserts in my shoes, and it's slowly getting better. A night splint helped, as well.
Really? Well I want to chat with you then.

Did you do any physical therapy with your PF? Currently my treatment plan is....

1) Wear minimalist shoes.
2) Physical therapy that uses a cold laser treatment and ultrasound treatment.
3) Reflexology treatments on my feet/calves.

What treatment plan did you do?
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:57 AM   #5
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My adult son has these. In high school and again in college a doctor made plaster casts of his feet from which the orthotics were made. No more stress fractures.

Did you call your insurance company and were informed that the orthotics were not covered, or did someone at the podistrist's office tell you that? I went around with our (former) podiatrist and his staff about this. They said the orthotics would not be covered, although my insurance company had already said they were, that we could get them every two years I believe. This was a second pair several years after getting the first pair. I finally paid in advance but insisted that the insurance company be billed, and sure enough, they were covered.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:00 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by The Mystery Machine View Post
Really? Well I want to chat with you then.

Did you do any physical therapy with your PF? Currently my treatment plan is....

1) Wear minimalist shoes.
2) Physical therapy that uses a cold laser treatment and ultrasound treatment.
3) Reflexology treatments on my feet/calves.

What treatment plan did you do?
Daily stretching - at least 5x day - plus icing after stretching. I wasn't referred to PT, but I am interested in your cold laser and ultrasound treatment! I miss my minimalist shoes! And I miss going barefoot around the house! I don't wake up in pain anymore, but if I am out walking for long periods of time, it starts to flare up.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:18 AM   #7
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I'd say it depends on why your prescribed them. I have bad arches and was prescribed orthodics. They were made to order by the doctor with goop put on my feet. They were about $350 at the time about 3 yrs ago. I still wear the same pair.

At one time I did go to Walmart and do the Scholl's inserts they advertise on TV. I compared it to the one I wear and they were very very similar in flexiblity and shape. They were only $50. If I every need a spare pair I'd get those first.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:19 AM   #8
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Daily stretching - at least 5x day - plus icing after stretching. I wasn't referred to PT, but I am interested in your cold laser and ultrasound treatment! I miss my minimalist shoes! And I miss going barefoot around the house! I don't wake up in pain anymore, but if I am out walking for long periods of time, it starts to flare up.
I was given your plan at first from an orthopedic surgeon. Well, the stretching turned into having my foot in pain for 5 days in a row, so I decided to see a podiatrist last week.

I have had only 1 treatment. It was explained that the cold laser REPAIRS damaged tissue. The reflexology will loosen the tendons. That I do believe and I do know it will help.

Basically the reflexologist explained that if you are in pain, do not exercise or stretch. You have to heal first. Of course he charges 60 bucks an hour and it is not covered by insurance. The PT is for me.

That being said, I am considering seeing another podiatrist for a second opinion. Reason is I want an MRI done. I do not think the podiatrist took enough time to diagnose my condition.

This freaking blows doesn't it?

ETA...thanks for the heads up on the shoes. I am doing my homework there on it.

OP, I am sorry to hijack your thread. I really am interested in your condition on the need for orthotics.

It is really crazy out there with regard to treatment.




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Old 03-02-2013, 08:51 AM   #9
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My feet are pretty far gone now. I have custom orthotics made about every 18months. Sometimes insurance pays, sometimes they don't. Either way, i have to have them. Cheap Walmart Dr scholls orthotics are worth just about what you pay for.them. if I don't wear my orthotics every single day, I am very quickly crippled
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Old 03-02-2013, 09:31 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Sadie22 View Post
My adult son has these. In high school and again in college a doctor made plaster casts of his feet from which the orthotics were made. No more stress fractures.

Did you call your insurance company and were informed that the orthotics were not covered, or did someone at the podistrist's office tell you that? I went around with our (former) podiatrist and his staff about this. They said the orthotics would not be covered, although my insurance company had already said they were, that we could get them every two years I believe. This was a second pair several years after getting the first pair. I finally paid in advance but insisted that the insurance company be billed, and sure enough, they were covered.
I manage a very large podiatry practice. We will cast feet and hold the casts in the office. We submit to insurance and once payment is received the casts are sent out for fabrication. Saves a lot of confusion and wasted fabrication. Can't tell you how many people are told by their insurance that orthotics are covered and then they are denied down the line because the insurance "changed their coverage policy". One other thing that can sometimes make the difference is a "letter of necessity" from the doctor to the insurance carrier.
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Old 03-02-2013, 09:32 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Mystery Machine View Post
I have had only 1 treatment. It was explained that the cold laser REPAIRS damaged tissue. The reflexology will loosen the tendons. That I do believe and I do know it will help.

Basically the reflexologist explained that if you are in pain, do not exercise or stretch. You have to heal first. Of course he charges 60 bucks an hour and it is not covered by insurance. The PT is for me.

That being said, I am considering seeing another podiatrist for a second opinion. Reason is I want an MRI done. I do not think the podiatrist took enough time to diagnose my condition.

This freaking blows doesn't it?

ETA...thanks for the heads up on the shoes. I am doing my homework there on it.

OP, I am sorry to hijack your thread. I really am interested in your condition on the need for orthotics.

It is really crazy out there with regard to treatment.
I know someone in my town that has the cold laser. I need to look into this!

I'm sure you know this if you've been reading, but the key to PF getting better is keeping that fascia stretched so it won't heal in the shortened form that happens when it's hurt and you start retracting your foot to keep it from hurting. This is HUGE at night. Think about when you get in bed and get your feet under the covers. You tend to bend your toes down, which shortens the fascia. You sleep in this position, and when you get up in the morning it hurts like crazy when you start to straighten it out. The night splint keeps the foot extended so it starts healing in a better position. I really think this is one thing that really helped with the healing.

The first doc I went to was a podiatrist, and I don't totally agree with his recommendations, so I've been on the net looking for ways to make it better.
I do go to a massage therapist, but that's just once a month, but they work my foot and calf over like crazy. My calf is still pretty tight, so I'm working hard to get that stretched out more. I really need to look into doing some yoga.

It is a slow healing process, unfortunately. There's no way to really stay off your feet 24/7 to make it go faster, so you have to do everything you can to protect the healing you're doing. To bring it back to orthotics, I'll share my story. I hurt my foot 2 weeks before a week-long Disney trip. I walked throughout my Disney trip, and I was in horrible pain every night and every morning. I did more damage, and I really should have rented a scooter. Fast forward to December, and I was still hurting and getting ready to go back to Disney. Trips to the grocery store were okay, but I dreaded all the walking I was about to do. So, I went to my local Foot Solutions store and picked up three things: a new pair of sneakers, the Powerstep orthotic inserts for those sneakers and a pair of Orthaheel slides. I spent 4 days walking around Disney, wore my splint each night, and I had very little pain. From there things have gotten incrementally better every day.

For the OP, I'd try to see if there was a store in your area, like Foot Solutions, that may be able to help you without having to go the custom orthotic route. It's worth a shot. I'd be cautious about ordering custom orthotics online because if anything is not right with them, you might do even more damage to your feet. And I'd definitely contact your insurance company directly to make sure they aren't covered.
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Old 03-02-2013, 09:55 AM   #12
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Custom orthotics are "custom" made.
Most podiatrists make a mold of your feet and send in to the company to have them made. That's why they are custom.
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Old 03-02-2013, 11:14 AM   #13
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At one time I did go to Walmart and do the Scholl's inserts they advertise on TV. I compared it to the one I wear and they were very very similar in flexiblity and shape. They were only $50. If I every need a spare pair I'd get those first.
Are these the inserts where the machine analyzes your foot then tells you which one of the inserts fits the shape of your foot? My insurance won't cover the custom orthotics, but I have been thinking of trying these.
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Old 03-02-2013, 01:05 PM   #14
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I manage a very large podiatry practice. We will cast feet and hold the casts in the office. We submit to insurance and once payment is received the casts are sent out for fabrication. Saves a lot of confusion and wasted fabrication. Can't tell you how many people are told by their insurance that orthotics are covered and then they are denied down the line because the insurance "changed their coverage policy". One other thing that can sometimes make the difference is a "letter of necessity" from the doctor to the insurance carrier.
I'm sure that sounds like a good business practice to you. However, if I had brought my son to you, in pain, and I found out you caused him to suffer an extra month because you did not believe I knew my own insurance coverage, the least I would do is pull all family members' care away from your practice. Whatever happened to medical care and the best interests of the patients?
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Old 03-02-2013, 04:44 PM   #15
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I use Lynco orthotics. Most places that sell them have the machine for you to stand on to see which one you need. The run around $60 there. Once you find out the one you need, you can order subsequent ones online for less. I sue the L605 model. I also have the 3/4 length version that I use in some of my dress shoes.
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