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Old 02-12-2013, 08:08 AM   #121
Granny square
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I'm making my first kings cake today. can't wait! Using my friends recipe and instructions. I've never had one before.
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Old 02-12-2013, 08:14 AM   #122
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HAPPY MARDI GRAS!

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Old 02-12-2013, 11:49 AM   #123
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Paul Prudomme is a good chef, but was just pointing out that *blackened* anything is not south LA culture - that was his invention that *he* started calling cajun - to my knowledge it was not native to the area at all before him. If so, maybe some of my fellow south *Louisianians* can help me out.
That's correct. He created the fad. I know his family and went to school with several of his nieces and nephews; I have to tell you that our area was never as impressed with Paul as the rest of the country was; most locals do not consider him nearly as skilled as someone like John Folse, for instance. (Folse is a master -- he is from the Convent area but trained in Europe.)

FWIW, Spiciness at that level actually wasn't encountered much at all locally except in sausage; and the point of doing it in sausage is so that the rice and or beans would pick up the flavor but mellow it with their starch. Later, after people elsewhere started equating "Cajun" with "very spicy", then the locals got onto a kick of trying to outdo one another with how much heat they could tolerate. Now, I like my food to have flavor, but now that I have some money I don't need it to burn my mouth out - thats a poverty trick. (Cayenne is first and foremost a preservative -- it was originally adapted by Cajuns after the local Native American tribes showed them that it could be used to make it possible to safely eat partially spoiled food.

Growing up I spent a lot of time in the depths of rural Acadiana, and most older folks there would only consider "blackening" the less-desirable roasted game meats in the old days; it was done most often with things like a venison haunch that had been hanging too long, and you would scrape it off before you ate the meat. Also, we didn't actually EAT alligator in the old days except in Sauce Piquant during Lent -- we didn't take young gators because they were hunted for the hides, and mature gator has a texture that is highly reminescent of a steel-belted radial, IMO. (I really don't care if it tastes like chicken -- I don't eat that rubbery garbage unless I'm DANGED hungry. Also, FWIW, wild-caught gator really needs aromatic seasoning to make it palatable -- gamey does not BEGIN to describe the odor of raw wild gator meat. What you buy in restaurants these days is all farmed.)

(To qualify, I'm NOT Cajun. I'm Irish, but for reasons too complicated to go into, my immediate family immigrated to the New Orleans area just before I was born. My Dad was big on hunting and fishing though; we spent a lot of time out in the country and on the water when we were kids. We also spent a lot of time near Parasol's at this time of year, but that's another discussion, LOL.)

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Can't beat Louisiana style red beans, sausage and rice either. It's a staple with us and it's on my menu for Thursday this week.
Red beans and rice is the one local food that I will not eat -- never could stand the stuff, except that I would pick out and rinse off the sausage to eat with my cornbread. I spent every Monday of the 12 years that I spent in school hungry, because it was guaranteed to be served every single Monday of the school year.

FWIW, however, for those who don't know the distinction: Cajun food was never traditional in greater New Orleans, and certainly not in the more fashionable parts of town. The traditional cuisine of the Crescent City is Creole, and tended to be just as hidebound in terms of preparation styles as French cuisine anywhere. Back in the 1960s a restaurant like Cochon would never have managed to stay in business, let alone become a difficult table to get.

PS: Happy Mardi Gras, all y'all! Laissez les bon temps rouler.

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Old 02-12-2013, 01:36 PM   #124
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That's correct. He created the fad. I know his family and went to school with several of his nieces and nephews; I have to tell you that our area was never as impressed with Paul as the rest of the country was; most locals do not consider him nearly as skilled as someone like John Folse, for instance. (Folse is a master -- he is from the Convent area but trained in Europe.)

FWIW, Spiciness at that level actually wasn't encountered much at all locally except in sausage; and the point of doing it in sausage is so that the rice and or beans would pick up the flavor but mellow it with their starch. Later, after people elsewhere started equating "Cajun" with "very spicy", then the locals got onto a kick of trying to outdo one another with how much heat they could tolerate. Now, I like my food to have flavor, but now that I have some money I don't need it to burn my mouth out - thats a poverty trick. (Cayenne is first and foremost a preservative -- it was originally adapted by Cajuns after the local Native American tribes showed them that it could be used to make it possible to safely eat partially spoiled food.

Growing up I spent a lot of time in the depths of rural Acadiana, and most older folks there would only consider "blackening" the less-desirable roasted game meats in the old days; it was done most often with things like a venison haunch that had been hanging too long, and you would scrape it off before you ate the meat. Also, we didn't actually EAT alligator in the old days except in Sauce Piquant during Lent -- we didn't take young gators because they were hunted for the hides, and mature gator has a texture that is highly reminescent of a steel-belted radial, IMO. (I really don't care if it tastes like chicken -- I don't eat that rubbery garbage unless I'm DANGED hungry. Also, FWIW, wild-caught gator really needs aromatic seasoning to make it palatable -- gamey does not BEGIN to describe the odor of raw wild gator meat. What you buy in restaurants these days is all farmed.)

(To qualify, I'm NOT Cajun. I'm Irish, but for reasons too complicated to go into, my immediate family immigrated to the New Orleans area just before I was born. My Dad was big on hunting and fishing though; we spent a lot of time out in the country and on the water when we were kids. We also spent a lot of time near Parasol's at this time of year, but that's another discussion, LOL.)



Red beans and rice is the one local food that I will not eat -- never could stand the stuff, except that I would pick out and rinse off the sausage to eat with my cornbread. I spent every Monday of the 12 years that I spent in school hungry, because it was guaranteed to be served every single Monday of the school year.

FWIW, however, for those who don't know the distinction: Cajun food was never traditional in greater New Orleans, and certainly not in the more fashionable parts of town. The traditional cuisine of the Crescent City is Creole, and tended to be just as hidebound in terms of preparation styles as French cuisine anywhere. Back in the 1960s a restaurant like Cochon would never have managed to stay in business, let alone become a difficult table to get.

PS: Happy Mardi Gras, all y'all! Laissez les bon temps rouler.
PPS: For the locals and former locals here, here is a new blast from the past for you if you didn't get to see Endymion roll this year: film of their 9 piece Ponchartrain Beach float, including a representation of the Zephyr: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gUCzhGnvIw
(Seeing as how this is a theme park site and all, LOL.)
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Old 02-12-2013, 04:52 PM   #125
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A few pictures from today.





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Old 02-12-2013, 04:59 PM   #126
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This is why I love New Orleans




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Old 02-12-2013, 05:22 PM   #127
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Notursula I love the culinary history lesson! Thank you!
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:39 PM   #128
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I'm definitely taking notes from the people that love NO in this thread. I have never been but have been dying to, so I'm going with two other girlfriends at the end of April! I hope it won't be too hot then. I'm OK with it having smelly parts and/or shady areas. I love big cities and all that comes with them
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:55 PM   #129
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April should be a beautiful time to be in new Orleans. Check to see what festivals are going on then.
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:16 PM   #130
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Thanks for the pics, Epcot! Looks like you had a good day Was afraid the rain would wash it away, but maybe it had passed.
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:19 PM   #131
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Fantastic pics Epcot! Thanks for sharing. Wish it were sunnier for you.
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:27 PM   #132
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NotUrsula, can't believe you grew up with red beans & rice and never learned to like them We loved them so much, sometimes we would beg our mom to fix them more than once a week!

Of course, I married a yankee (no offense to other yankees, just mess with my dh all the time), and he had never seen a red kidney bean

I *had* to have them, so he learned to eat them. Now, he's the one that asks for them if I haven't cooked them in a while! Just asked for them again yest.

Oh, yes, south LA is not just a place to live, it is a *way of life*
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:30 PM   #133
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NotUrsula, can't believe you grew up with red beans & rice and never learned to like them We loved them so much, sometimes we would beg our mom to fix them more than once a week!

Of course, I married a yankee (no offense to other yankees, just mess with my dh all the time), and he had never seen a red kidney bean

I *had* to have them, so he learned to eat them. Now, he's the one that asks for them if I haven't cooked them in a while! Just asked for them again yest.

Oh, yes, south LA is not just a place to live, it is a *way of life*
As I read this I was thinking "we're talking about New Orleans why is is she talking about growing up in South Los Angeles."
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:24 PM   #134
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That's correct. He created the fad. I know his family and went to school with several of his nieces and nephews; I have to tell you that our area was never as impressed with Paul as the rest of the country was; most locals do not consider him nearly as skilled as someone like John Folse, for instance. (Folse is a master -- he is from the Convent area but trained in Europe.)

FWIW, Spiciness at that level actually wasn't encountered much at all locally except in sausage; and the point of doing it in sausage is so that the rice and or beans would pick up the flavor but mellow it with their starch. Later, after people elsewhere started equating "Cajun" with "very spicy", then the locals got onto a kick of trying to outdo one another with how much heat they could tolerate. Now, I like my food to have flavor, but now that I have some money I don't need it to burn my mouth out - thats a poverty trick. (Cayenne is first and foremost a preservative -- it was originally adapted by Cajuns after the local Native American tribes showed them that it could be used to make it possible to safely eat partially spoiled food.

Growing up I spent a lot of time in the depths of rural Acadiana, and most older folks there would only consider "blackening" the less-desirable roasted game meats in the old days; it was done most often with things like a venison haunch that had been hanging too long, and you would scrape it off before you ate the meat. Also, we didn't actually EAT alligator in the old days except in Sauce Piquant during Lent -- we didn't take young gators because they were hunted for the hides, and mature gator has a texture that is highly reminescent of a steel-belted radial, IMO. (I really don't care if it tastes like chicken -- I don't eat that rubbery garbage unless I'm DANGED hungry. Also, FWIW, wild-caught gator really needs aromatic seasoning to make it palatable -- gamey does not BEGIN to describe the odor of raw wild gator meat. What you buy in restaurants these days is all farmed.)

(To qualify, I'm NOT Cajun. I'm Irish, but for reasons too complicated to go into, my immediate family immigrated to the New Orleans area just before I was born. My Dad was big on hunting and fishing though; we spent a lot of time out in the country and on the water when we were kids. We also spent a lot of time near Parasol's at this time of year, but that's another discussion, LOL.)



Red beans and rice is the one local food that I will not eat -- never could stand the stuff, except that I would pick out and rinse off the sausage to eat with my cornbread. I spent every Monday of the 12 years that I spent in school hungry, because it was guaranteed to be served every single Monday of the school year.

FWIW, however, for those who don't know the distinction: Cajun food was never traditional in greater New Orleans, and certainly not in the more fashionable parts of town. The traditional cuisine of the Crescent City is Creole, and tended to be just as hidebound in terms of preparation styles as French cuisine anywhere. Back in the 1960s a restaurant like Cochon would never have managed to stay in business, let alone become a difficult table to get.

PS: Happy Mardi Gras, all y'all! Laissez les bon temps rouler.

I was and am just the opposite with red beans. Love the beans but will pick out every piece of sausage.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:46 PM   #135
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As I read this I was thinking "we're talking about New Orleans why is is she talking about growing up in South Los Angeles."
Ahhh, yes, that is a *big* pet peeve of mine. Every state has an official abbreviation, and LA is for Louisiana. *Yet*, on the news, wherever, when LA is mentioned, it usually is meant for Los Angeles. Go figure
That's why, most of the time, I will just spell it out
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