Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Photography Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-06-2013, 07:46 PM   #1
caa1277
American by birth............Grumpy by choice!
 
caa1277's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Shelbyville, KY
Posts: 388

Filters....use or don't use?

Is there any point to using filters like UV or polarizing? Just got my first SLR and I know they make them for them, but I've never used one. Any benefit to using them?
__________________
-Chad
DIS Dad's Club Member #122

Me DW DS(17) DD(13)

July 2007-Pop Century; June 2009-Pop Century; June 2011-Caribbean Beach; June 2013-POR
caa1277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 08:10 PM   #2
wbeem
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,396

Quote:
Originally Posted by caa1277 View Post
Is there any point to using filters like UV or polarizing? Just got my first SLR and I know they make them for them, but I've never used one. Any benefit to using them?
UV, not so much. A polarizer can be quite useful to reduce glare. For example, you could be shooting water or a window without a polarizer and the surface will just give you a lot of reflection. Put on the polarizer and you can see what's under the water or behind the window. Keep in mind that it will cut a stop of light when you use it.
wbeem is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 02-06-2013, 08:22 PM   #3
photo_chick
Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about nothing.
 
photo_chick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: in the middle of Dallas/Fort Worth
Posts: 4,902

I agree with wbeem. UV filters can cause more problems than they solve. But a polarizer is a very handy tool to have in your bag.
__________________
Danielle

photo_chick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 09:03 PM   #4
littlekidagain
Mouseketeer
 
littlekidagain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 158

I started out using UV filter and now I feel I wasted my money. Photo Chick and wbeem mention polarizer filters which I agree with. Now I pretty much only use Neutral Dentistry filters to slow my shutter speed during the day.
__________________
littlekidagain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 11:24 PM   #5
caa1277
American by birth............Grumpy by choice!
 
caa1277's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Shelbyville, KY
Posts: 388

Well I'm glad that I didn't run out and but a UV filter. I may look into the polarizer. I knew I could count on you guys to give great advice!

Any other suggestions or tips with filters?
__________________
-Chad
DIS Dad's Club Member #122

Me DW DS(17) DD(13)

July 2007-Pop Century; June 2009-Pop Century; June 2011-Caribbean Beach; June 2013-POR
caa1277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 11:26 PM   #6
disneybaker
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 79

Used a uv filter for past 20 years on every rebel I've had, don't like pictures without it
disneybaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 08:07 AM   #7
Pixel Dust
It's a trap!
 
Pixel Dust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 484

The UV filters are no longer necessary. They were a must using film. As film is sensitive to UV light, it would cast a bluish haze outdoors.

Digital sensors have the UV (and IR) filters built right into them. Adding an additional UV filter does nothing to improve the image. Many would argue that adding that extra glass would degrade the photo, make it less sharp or less contrast. Any improvement is a placebo effect.

UV filters (or plain clear filters) definitely increases the chance of flare and reflections in the lens. Here is my mistake. On the left, you can see the reflection of the bright lights from the right. This wasn't a cheapo brand filter either. It was taken with a Hoya UV Multi-Coated filter. Which is now collecting dust.


Polarizing filters can be very useful. Like others have said, they can reduce reflections off of water and glass, or have the sky a deeper blue and vegetation more vibrant. Here are my samples.

No filter


With a polarizing filter
__________________
Franklin and Missy
Instagram: snapnpixels -- Check us out on Facebook!

Trip Reports: I Can Spot Frozen Fireworks Anywhere! 08/2014 ; All You Need is The Force, Trust and Pixie Dust! 05/2014
Wait! Where's your wedding ring? 10/2013 ; Food, friendship, flowers and a touch of the Force 05/2013 ; A Disney Geek-tastic Trip to the World 01/2013 ; Happily Ever After Begins Here 10/2012 ; Peekaboo, I see Pluto! A 1st Birthday TR 3/2012 ; Boo to Two 10/2011 ; A Failure to Launch 10/2010

02/09-Mariott Imperial Palms, 10/10-Mystic Dunes, 10/11-CR, 03/12-Windsor Hills, 10/12-BCV/AKV, 01/13-BWV, 05/13-BLT, 10/13-YC, 05/14-BWV, 08/14-VGF, 12/14-BWV, 04/15-BLT

Nikon D600
Nikkor 24-120mm f/4 ED VR ; Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 G ; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ; Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 ; Nikon SB-800 ; Manfrotto 055CXPRO4 Tripod
Pixel Dust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 09:30 AM   #8
MikeandReneePlus5
DIS Veteran
 
MikeandReneePlus5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Long Island
Posts: 1,687

I like my polarizing filter, but you really nned to be at the right angle to the sun. Or maybe I'm using it wrong. See this example where some of the sky isn't polarized becasue the light isn't at the right angle.

Is this avoidable?

__________________
and as we wind on down the road...
MikeandReneePlus5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 09:35 AM   #9
photo_chick
Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about nothing.
 
photo_chick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: in the middle of Dallas/Fort Worth
Posts: 4,902

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pixel Dust View Post
The UV filters are no longer necessary. They were a must using film. As film is sensitive to UV light, it would cast a bluish haze outdoors.

Digital sensors have the UV (and IR) filters built right into them. Adding an additional UV filter does nothing to improve the image. Many would argue that adding that extra glass would degrade the photo, make it less sharp or less contrast. Any improvement is a placebo effect.
Yep. They don't do anything good with digital. And newer films do not have color shift from UV as much as older films so a lot of film photographers forgo the UV filters now as well.
__________________
Danielle

photo_chick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 09:39 AM   #10
mom2rtk
DIS Veteran
 
mom2rtk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 29,176

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeandReneePlus5 View Post
I like my polarizing filter, but you really nned to be at the right angle to the sun. Or maybe I'm using it wrong. See this example where some of the sky isn't polarized becasue the light isn't at the right angle.

Is this avoidable?

I do know polarizing filters can add vignetting at ultra wide angles. That looks like a fairly wide shot. Maybe that's what's going on here.
mom2rtk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 09:41 AM   #11
wiigirl
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15,974

I like my polorizing filter....UV I don't bother with anymore.
__________________
For the love of Disney...
wiigirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 10:20 AM   #12
cpbjgc
Earned My Ears
We cannot lose the kitchen
Who knew I had no pictures of Frontierland?
 
cpbjgc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 1,617

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeandReneePlus5 View Post
I like my polarizing filter, but you really nned to be at the right angle to the sun. Or maybe I'm using it wrong. See this example where some of the sky isn't polarized becasue the light isn't at the right angle.

Is this avoidable?

Like Mom2RTK said, you get this uneven polarization with a wide angle lens. It's not really avoidable, though it can be more or less pronounced than you have here, depending on where the sun is in relation to the shot you are taking. My only advice is anticipate it will happen and either adjust your composition, or use the effect creatively in your composition.
__________________
Winnipeg: it may be cold, but Winnie liked it! Feel free to check out my photos, or photos of our last trip to WDW.
(Me) (DW) (DS16) (DD10)


cpbjgc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 12:39 PM   #13
Gianna'sPapa
DIS Veteran
 
Gianna'sPapa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Elgin, Il.
Posts: 3,704

I agree with most everyone about the UV filter. There is only one time that I use it and its only for added protection. I photograph Team Demolition Derby which is run on a wet, mud track. The mud and mud clods are flying everywhere. I can't count the number of times my cameras have been hit.


TDD5 0932 by Terry McGraw Photography, on Flickr


TD3 K 9132 by Terry McGraw Photography, on Flickr

I use the polarizing filter (and my ND filter) quite frequently for reasons the others have mentioned.
Gianna'sPapa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 09:20 PM   #14
caa1277
American by birth............Grumpy by choice!
 
caa1277's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Shelbyville, KY
Posts: 388

Thanks for all of the info and suggestions everyone. Is there a particular brand of a polarizing filter that is better than another or are they all pretty much the same?

I may get one and play around with it to see how it affects my shots. I'm not afraid of messing up or making mistakes. After all, that is how one learns the best in my opinion!
__________________
-Chad
DIS Dad's Club Member #122

Me DW DS(17) DD(13)

July 2007-Pop Century; June 2009-Pop Century; June 2011-Caribbean Beach; June 2013-POR
caa1277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 01:40 PM   #15
boBQuincy
I am not carrying three pods
There's something about the smell of the chemicals that just shouts "Photography!"
 
boBQuincy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,596

Digital camera sensors are not sensitive to UV so the filter does not provide a useful function unless we want it only for lens protection. A lens hood usually does better at this and has no chance of degrading the image (unless it vignettes). An inexpensive filter can degrade the image (slightly) and can also cause strange reflections when used in a dark area where there are light sources. This applies to polarizers or any other filter as well but the inexpensive (uncoated) filters are usually the worst.

A polarizing filter is useful for reducing reflections and atmospheric haze as well as improving color saturation. As long as there is sufficient light a polarizer could be left on the lens without any harm although in certain lighting it may not provide any benefit. For most dSLRs a circular polarizer is required, a linear polarizer may affect the focusing system.

Some good brands are B&W, Heliopan, Schneider; many others may be good also but the cheapest ones are probably not so good. They are definitely not all the same, some have color shifts, uneven polarization, glass that causes distortions, etc.
__________________
"Well, then, I confess. It's my intention to commandeer one of these ships, pick up a crew in Tortuga, raid, pillage, plunder, and otherwise pilfer my weasly black guts out."

"Take the big pill, and go back to the SLR you know. Take the small micro 4/3 pill and you will never look at SLRs the same way again." a G3 and now a GX7. Photos at: suzieandbob.com

Our model monorail site: http://monorail.suzieandbob.com/

boBQuincy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.