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Old 01-29-2013, 09:22 PM   #1
princessap
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Fireworks pics

Just wondering what setting and lens people are using to capture wishes?
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:22 AM   #2
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Actually the lens choice isn't that critical. What is critical is to stabilize your camera, either by putting it on something like a trash can, or by bringing a tripod.

Then you'll want to do the following:

1) Use a low ISO (100 or 200)

2) Use a small aperture (11 or so is good)

3) Use a long shutter speed (4-7 seconds is good)

4) If your lens has IS, turn it off.

5) Use a remote shutter release, or a time delay shutter, to avoid camera movement.

Then time to the bursts and have fun!
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:45 AM   #3
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mom2rtk summed it up nicely. I'll just add that some photographers like to use a neutral density filter when getting fireworks as well. It will let you make the shutter speed even longer.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:55 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photo_chick View Post
mom2rtk summed it up nicely. I'll just add that some photographers like to use a neutral density filter when getting fireworks as well. It will let you make the shutter speed even longer.
Thanks phootochick.

And I'll just add. Don't forget to bring that nice little bracket that attaches your camera TO the tripod.

Sounds simple, right?

Don't ask how I know this. You know, other than common sense.
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:00 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by mom2rtk View Post
Thanks phootochick.

And I'll just add. Don't forget to bring that nice little bracket that attaches your camera TO the tripod.

Sounds simple, right?

Don't ask how I know this. You know, other than common sense.
LOL...happened to me a few times.
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:11 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photo_chick View Post
mom2rtk summed it up nicely. I'll just add that some photographers like to use a neutral density filter when getting fireworks as well. It will let you make the shutter speed even longer.
Some of the shots I have seen with the ND filter have been spectacular. The downside is you may only get a few shots per show because of the length of the open shutter. Before attempting the ND, you may want to watch the fireworks show at least once so you can get the timing so you can obtain the best effects.
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:52 AM   #7
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Some of the shots I have seen with the ND filter have been spectacular. The downside is you may only get a few shots per show because of the length of the open shutter. Before attempting the ND, you may want to watch the fireworks show at least once so you can get the timing so you can obtain the best effects.
I thought about buying a ND filter for this past trip. So glad I didn't now. I've hear ND filters don't work very well without a tripod bracket......
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:38 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by mom2rtk View Post
Actually the lens choice isn't that critical. What is critical is to stabilize your camera, either by putting it on something like a trash can, or by bringing a tripod.

Then you'll want to do the following:

1) Use a low ISO (100 or 200)

2) Use a small aperture (11 or so is good)

3) Use a long shutter speed (4-7 seconds is good)

4) If your lens has IS, turn it off.

5) Use a remote shutter release, or a time delay shutter, to avoid camera movement.

Then time to the bursts and have fun!
*This*

A perfect, simple how-to, on how to get fireworks shots that will make people lust after your photos.

The only thing I can add --- is remember that you're basically shooting blind. Since you are talking about approximately a 7 second shutter release -- You're anticipating what the next 7 seconds will bring. So I'd simply keep snapping the shutter ever 7 seconds (or whatever shutter speed you use).
Walk away at the end of the night with 50+ shots.... And if you followed these instructions, a handful of those 50 shots will be magnificent.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:53 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianna'sPapa View Post
Some of the shots I have seen with the ND filter have been spectacular. The downside is you may only get a few shots per show because of the length of the open shutter. Before attempting the ND, you may want to watch the fireworks show at least once so you can get the timing so you can obtain the best effects.
Another good reason to use a ND filter is to avoid a loss of sharpness from diffraction. This is mostly on smaller sensors but it can be noticeable on 1" sensors at f/8 or above, micro 4/3 at f/11, and APS-C at f/16.
The loss is not noticeable at any aperture when we forget the tripod clamp. Or the remote release, not that I would know anything about forgetting that.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:56 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2rtk View Post
Actually the lens choice isn't that critical. What is critical is to stabilize your camera, either by putting it on something like a trash can, or by bringing a tripod.

Then you'll want to do the following:

1) Use a low ISO (100 or 200)

2) Use a small aperture (11 or so is good)

3) Use a long shutter speed (4-7 seconds is good)

4) If your lens has IS, turn it off.

5) Use a remote shutter release, or a time delay shutter, to avoid camera movement.

Then time to the bursts and have fun!
What he said.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:59 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianna'sPapa View Post
Some of the shots I have seen with the ND filter have been spectacular. The downside is you may only get a few shots per show because of the length of the open shutter. Before attempting the ND, you may want to watch the fireworks show at least once so you can get the timing so you can obtain the best effects.
I pretty much have my setting down. After I get framed up, and fire one or two test shots, i turn on my interval timeer on my D7000. Every 5 seconds, I take a 5 second exposure for the entire length of the show. that way I get to watch the show with my eyes, and let the camera do its thing.

I get some keepers, and some throw aways, but it works well.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:57 PM   #12
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Or the remote release, not that I would know anything about forgetting that.
LOL, I had TWO of those along. Not that it helped. The bad part is that I had the dumb thing in my backpack all week. I just left it in the room by accident when I repacked it that morning.

I usually just leave the bracket on my camera when I'm at Disney to avoid this sort of thing. But I got a Black Rapid strap last year so that wasn't possible.
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2rtk View Post
Actually the lens choice isn't that critical. What is critical is to stabilize your camera, either by putting it on something like a trash can, or by bringing a tripod.

Then you'll want to do the following:

1) Use a low ISO (100 or 200)

2) Use a small aperture (11 or so is good)

3) Use a long shutter speed (4-7 seconds is good)

4) If your lens has IS, turn it off.

5) Use a remote shutter release, or a time delay shutter, to avoid camera movement.

Then time to the bursts and have fun!
Should add where/how to focus to the list and it could be a sticky!
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:08 PM   #14
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Should add where/how to focus to the list and it could be a sticky!
Ahhhh! I kept feeling like I had missed something. I usually either focus to infinity, or focus on the castle, then switch to manual focus so the camera won't waste time searching for focus with each shot.
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:37 PM   #15
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Ahhhh! I kept feeling like I had missed something. I usually either focus to infinity, or focus on the castle, then switch to manual focus so the camera won't waste time searching for focus with each shot.
I manually focus to infinity and then slightly bring it back. Because of the large depth of field, the fireworks (which are mostly way behind the castle) and the castle will both be in focus.
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