Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-07-2013, 06:27 AM   #76
mdsoccermom
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,571

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
I've been sitting here thinking more about this. I came from a really populated built up area, the only thing I ever came across were lost dogs with collars. I'd go up to them, check if they were friendly and then call their owner. I've done that 3 times.

I also volunteered for a animal rescue and they always gave me the intimidating dogs like dobermans or rottweilers because I have no fear of animals. I've always been like this though, I don't remember ever fearing any type of animal and when I see them I immediately put human feelings on them. I'm constantly trying to pet the ducks by our pond, and when I went to Ireland I pet a sheep and a giant swan that was laying in the grass. I yearn for some sort of connection. I guess I'm getting all psychological about it. I'll stop rambling now.
One day this fearless attitude of yours is going to get you into a world of trouble. Just leave the animals alone. They are neither your pets or your friends.
mdsoccermom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 06:54 AM   #77
NHdisneylover
Lanyards are taking all my poor organizatioanl skills
mice and such creatures tend to like to travel aorund
 
NHdisneylover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Heidelberg, Germany (formally from New Hampshire)
Posts: 13,958

OP--I am sorry but this is about YOU, not the animals. You are tricking yourself into thinking you are helping so you can feel good about yourself. They are NOT people or human-like in any way; they are not even pets. Insisting on treating them as such puts both you and them as well as your own pets and your neighbors in danger.

Truly, if you stop and really think about what you are doing and what these wild animals are at the end of the day what you are doing are not "good deeds" at all--they are careless, selfish acts meant to make you feel good about "helping" while in fact causing a lot more problems all the way around.

I really, really hope you can step back and look at things objectively and stop this type of behavior (petting wild ducks, feeding feral cats, etc) now.
__________________
Hadley

My blog about my wanderings and ramblings in Europe, Disney and where ever else life takes me:

http://hadleyswanderingsandramblings.blogspot.de/

Last edited by NHdisneylover; 01-07-2013 at 08:00 AM.
NHdisneylover is online now   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 01-07-2013, 07:59 AM   #78
joyjanet
Melbourne FL
 
joyjanet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Melbourne FL
Posts: 633

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiveYourLife View Post
The great advice being given is falling on deaf ears here.

I wouldn't continue to waste the energy and key strokes.
So true. She does not follow advice and I think she is bored and wants to see how many threads she can start so she has something to read. Hopefully her job at Disney will keep her busy and away from strays and tenants. But, just to stay on topic, I will tell her that my mom got cat scratch fever from a pet cat that I had and she should have it looked at. We did not have insurance growing up but that is why they have health care for people who can not afford it.

Last edited by joyjanet; 01-08-2013 at 08:40 AM.
joyjanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 08:01 AM   #79
Maggie Lizer
DIS Veteran
 
Maggie Lizer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: DC
Posts: 537

I would never feed a stray cat, or try to pick one up or "convert" it to a house cat. I'd be on the phone with animal control. They are invasive pests.

Not like the OP will do what is right, anyway.
__________________
First trip with DS1 10/27 - 11/2/12.

DS1 & DS2 (and DH, of course) 4/29 - 5/8/14.

Possibly again in January 2015????
Maggie Lizer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:07 AM   #80
Lynne M
 
Lynne M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 9,029
DISboards Moderator

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
I've been sitting here thinking more about this. I came from a really populated built up area, the only thing I ever came across were lost dogs with collars. I'd go up to them, check if they were friendly and then call their owner. I've done that 3 times.
This is a really good, really kind thing to do.

Quote:
I don't remember ever fearing any type of animal and when I see them I immediately put human feelings on them. I'm constantly trying to pet the ducks by our pond, and when I went to Ireland I pet a sheep and a giant swan that was laying in the grass.
But see, they're not people, or pets. They're wonderful, amazing creatures in their own right, and they deserve to live their lives the way they're intended to, and the way they want to. Healthy wild animals don't need or want human interference in their lives. It's not helping them, it's disrupting behavior that's evolved over thousands of years to be right for them.

The ducks don't want you to touch them. They're probably terrified of you, and continued attempts to pet them are just going to make them more frightened. I'm sure you don't want that.

Quote:
I yearn for some sort of connection.
I love animals, too, and I've made wonderful connections with my own pets and my friends' pets over the years. But wild animals, I enjoy from afar. Because it's better for them that way. I get great joy out of watching the many deer, turkeys, foxes, and ducks that hang out on my parents' property, I've learned so much about their behavior and it's fascinating. But I would never dream of touching any of them. It might be fun for me, but it would be bad for them. And in fact, the reason all those deer, etc, feel comfortable enough to hang around is that my parents have never bothered them in any way. They trust my parents to leave them alone. The deer will leave their babies in the tall grass a couple of yards from Mom & Dad's front door, and you can bet they wouldn't be doing that if Mom or Dad had ever gone near any of the fawns.

By the way, you mentioned that you can't stand for the feral cats to go hungry. What makes you think they're starving? Cats are amazing natural hunters. There are loads of farm cats around where my parents live, and they get along very well hunting their own food.

Your heart is in the right place, and if you want to help animals, there are SO many ways for you to do it. A hour of googling would get you a long list of rescue organizations, no-kill shelters, wildlife rehabilitation centers....all kinds of places that desperately need volunteer help from dedicated animal lovers.

Last edited by Lynne M; 01-07-2013 at 09:20 AM.
Lynne M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:15 AM   #81
RadioNate
DIS Veteran
 
RadioNate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,555

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover
OP--I am sorry but this is about YOU, not the animals. You are tricking yourself into thinking you are helping so you can feel good about yourself. They are NOT people or human-like in any way; they are not even pets. Insisting on treating them as such puts both you and them as well as your own pets and your neighbors in danger.

Truly, if you stop and really think about what you are doing and what these wild animals are at the end of the day what you are doing are not "good deeds" at all--they are careless, selfish acts meant to make you feel good about "helping" while in fact causing a lot more problems all the way around.

I really, really hope you can step back and look at things objectively and stop this type of behavior (petting wild ducks, feeding feral cats, etc) now.
I agree. I'm now hoping the op is just trolling. Because if not I think she needs some therapy.
__________________
Me DS DD
RadioNate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:21 AM   #82
IheartMickey
I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,067

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynne M

This is a really good, really kind thing to do.

But see, they're not people, or pets. They're wonderful, amazing creatures in their own right, and they deserve to live their lives the way they're intended to, and the way they want to. Healthy wild animals don't need or want human interference in their lives. It's not helping them, it's disrupting behavior that's evolved over thousands of years to be right for them.

The ducks don't want you to touch them. They're probably terrified of you, and continued attempts to pet them are just going to make them more frightened. I'm sure you don't want that.

I love animals, too, and I've made wonderful connections with my own pets and my friends' pets over the years. But wild animals, I enjoy from afar. Because it's better for them that way. I get great joy out of watching the many deer, turkeys, foxes, and ducks on my parents' property, I've learned so much about their behavior and it's fascinating. But I would never dream of touching any of them. It might be fun for me, but it would be bad for them.

By the way, you mentioned that you can't stand for the feral cats to go hungry. What makes you think they're starving? Cats are amazing natural hunters. There are loads of farm cats around where my parents live, and they get along very well hunting their own food.

Your heart is in the right place, and if you want to help animals, there are SO many ways for you to do it. A hour of googling would get you a long list of rescue organizations, no-kill shelters, wildlife rehabilitation centers....all kinds of places that desperately need volunteer help from dedicated animal lovers.
Thank you. You a very right. I used to volunteer like I said and that was very fulfilling for me. I had emailed a few organizations a couple of months ago but didn't receive a response. I need to be more diligent in finding a place to safely help animals in need.

Oh, and for the mean people in the thread I did call up a free clinic about the cat scratch but they said they couldn't see me until May! My only option is the ER. I did look up more information on cat scratch fever and things like a staph infection and mostly all things could be treated with amoxicillin which I'm already on a high dose of because of a lingering sinus infection. I really doubt any of you care about my well being but are just merely finding something to pick on me about. I just honestly don't understand why some of you keep coming back just to be mean. If what I've said really bothers you so much, or you think that I'm ignoring your advice wouldn't the obvious thing to do would be to stop offering it? I just don't get it.

I thought most Disney fans had kind hearts because they believe in the magic, but I'm not really seeing that in some of you.
IheartMickey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:56 AM   #83
WDSearcher
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 11,916

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
The stray was only in the bathroom and it was completely sterilized with bleach before my animals were allowed near it.
You "completely sterilized" a kitten with bleach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
And I did contact a rescue, they were the ones who told me to try to catch them. I was going to keep him in the bathroom until I could get him to them but my dog went nuts and wouldn't stop barking at the bathroom door. We have quiet rules in my town so I couldn't let her bark all night and unfortunately they only come around at night.
I imagine the rescue figured you'd use a trap, or perhaps that you'd done this kind of rescue before. While I think that some of the responses here have been over-the-top "you could DIE" types of things, it is true that you shouldn't be handling ferals without both you and your animals being up to date on the important shots (tetanus for humans, rabies, FIV, FIP, distemper, parvo, etc. for animals). I've had my share of scratches and bites from kittens I've fostered, and only once had a problem (cat scratch fever ... no fun). But I've nearly lost one of my cats when it picked up a disease from a rescued feral. Thankfully, I had the money to deal with the vet bills, but you do have to be careful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
There is one with a broken leg that I've been trying to catch because the rescue said they would pay for its medical treatment but it won't let me near it.
Call your local animal control or a local trap / neuter / release shelter and ask them to borrow a humane trap. Make sure they tell you how to use it, and make sure you know what to do once you have the cat in the trap!

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
I'm just trying to do the right thing, I'm an animal lover and seeing them go hungry or in the case of the injured one, in pain, is killing me. If I put food out the skinny one and the injured one don't get much if any because the bigger cats are fighting for it. I stopped putting out food.
With feral cats, you need to either go "all in" or you need to do nothing. It's cruel to the cats to go half-way. If you're going to bring a kitten in, you need to be sure your home can handle it (both from a space POV and a noise standpoint, if your own pets are going to react). Otherwise, leave it outside. You can't tame a feral kitten by bringing it in and then letting it back out again. It's all or nothing.

WDSearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:58 AM   #84
WDSearcher
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 11,916

Quote:
Originally Posted by kimblebee View Post
You picked the one that looked like he wanted to be an indoor cat? What, did he have a suitcase with him?
OK .. I'm sorry, but that just made me giggle.

Searching Google for "cats with suitcases" ...

WDSearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:01 AM   #85
IheartMickey
I have not been blessed by the tag fairy!
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,067

Quote:
Originally Posted by WDSearcher
You "completely sterilized" a kitten with bleach?

y:
Hah! No, the bathroom after the kitten was back outside.
IheartMickey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:04 AM   #86
WDSearcher
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 11,916

Quote:
Originally Posted by npmommie View Post
You dont have an animal shelter in your town? Animal control will come get them and take them to the shelter. Where is the mama cat?
In many communities, Animal Control will not come out to pick up ferals unless the animals are in danger (kids harming them, people shooting at them, etc), they are visibly sick, or they are called in as a nuisance. If they are called in as a nuisance, they will be put on a triage list and AC will get to them when they can. And even in that case, Animal Control will likely leave traps behind and the homeowner still has the responsibility of setting and monitoring the traps.

Unless the town has a large AC division with no other calls, picking up ferals is not something that gets immediate attention.

WDSearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:20 AM   #87
WDSearcher
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 11,916

Quote:
Originally Posted by coopersmom View Post
Handling feral cats is a very tricky business, but they are a "menace," as someone else dubbed them, created only because humans treat their pets as disposable and "let them go free," when they get tired of taking care of them ... Which really equates to leaving in them the wild to starve or otherwise die violently. Your instinct to help is admirable, and totally possible, but you must go about it the right way.

And the odds you'll become ill or die due to a scratch are roughly the same as winning the lottery.

The best, and most humane, way to cull a colony of TRULY feral cats is trap-neuter-return. You trap only the males (females are released immediately, without handling), have them neutered and then release them back WHERE YOU FOUND THEM, again, without undue handling. You take them in the morning, or the night before, and they're ready to be released that evening, with zero recovery time. Many rescues and clinics will do it for as little as $10-$20/cat. The colony will then die out very quickly. You can get rid of a 50-cat colony in less than six months, simply by neutering the males. The life expectancy of these cats is extremely short.
Depends on the colony -- we've had a 10-cat feral colony living in our neighborhood for going on seven years. All cats (male & female) have been spayed & neutered and have a food source that is actually sponsored by the HOA. Same cats have been around for over 6 years. Everyone knows them, and the cats are so smart I've seen them look both ways before they cross the street. One possible outcome of TNR is that you can "get rid of a 50-cat colony in less than six months", but it's also possible for the cats to live on happily for quite some time. On the plus side, our neighborhood has no snakes, mice, possums or other "wildlife", and no other ferals dare enter!

Quote:
Originally Posted by coopersmom View Post
Trapping these cats and taking them to animal control will ultimately just lead to them being immediately put down, as no organization will even attempt to re-home a feral cat, when there are millions of non-feral cats needing homes.
Not true. While it is rare to find a shelter or rescue that will put time into trying to socialize ferals, those groups are out there. The shelter I work with will rehabilitate and try to socialize feral cats if they think the cat is "feral" only because it was abandonded. They do personality checks on every cat and kitten that comes in, and a large number go out to foster for socialization. Two of my rescue cats started off as "ferals". I raised one from a kitten (foster-to-own kind of thing) and adopted the other one as a 2YO cat. How do I know it used to be feral? It had a tipped ear, indicating that it had been trapped, spayed and released at some point before it ended up in the shelter. It's not an automatic that ferals will be put down, but you do have to do your research if you want them to have a chance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by coopersmom View Post
The idea of whether or not to provide them with a food source is a mixed one. Some rescue groups strictly advise against it, while others say it doesn't really matter. The studies I've seen say that colonies with a human-provided food source that have been part of trap-neuter-return programs, survive only marginally longer than those left on their own, so providing food for them isn't the largest issue. The danger would be eliminating one colony only to trade it out for another, if another group finds the food source, but cats are territorial and while one or two will join a group, colonies tend to remain distinct (like wild cat prides).

For real information, check out reputable local rescues or start with this ASPCA FAQ on feral cats: http://www.aspca.org/adoption/feral-cats-faq.aspx, or this step-by-step guide to helping feral cats from the respected Alley Cat Allies: http://www.alleycat.org/document.doc?id=461.

There is a lot of really, really good information online about how to help. A vacation planning Disney community isn't really the first place I'd look for it, though.
Again ... careful how you generalize. You'd be surprised at the number of TNR people who also plan vacations (or work) at Disney. WDW property itself has a huge managed feral cat community.

WDSearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:26 AM   #88
WDSearcher
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 11,916

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
Hah! No, the bathroom after the kitten was back outside.
Oh thank God!

WDSearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:26 AM   #89
fortwildernessishome
DIS Veteran
 
fortwildernessishome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 851

Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartMickey View Post
I don't remember ever fearing any type of animal and when I see them I immediately put human feelings on them. I'm constantly trying to pet the ducks by our pond, and when I went to Ireland I pet a sheep and a giant swan that was laying in the grass. I yearn for some sort of connection. I guess I'm getting all psychological about it. I'll stop rambling now.
I have not read this whole post, but had to comment on this.

We have been fortunate to do a lot of traveling out west to countless National Parks. I would NEVER dream of touching a wild animal in the parks or in my backyard. The rangers probably spend more time teaching guests about staying away from animals and to certainly NOT touch them. Last summer we spent time in Glacier National Park. Twice, we ended up so close to mountain goats, that we could have petted them. I never would have considered touching them and would have been quite ANGRY if I saw another guest touching them.

So many bears have had to be killed, because people have feed them and petted them. In doing so, they became to used to humans and in becoming to comfortable around people,they through no fault of their own became dangerous.

People should really stop and realize that by trying to be "friendly" to wild animals you could actually be the one that gets them killed down the road.........thats not being an animal lover.........
__________________
New Hampshire
fortwildernessishome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:44 AM   #90
mimmi
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Austria
Posts: 1,038

Quote:
Originally Posted by fortwildernessishome View Post
I have not read this whole post, but had to comment on this.

We have been fortunate to do a lot of traveling out west to countless National Parks. I would NEVER dream of touching a wild animal in the parks or in my backyard. The rangers probably spend more time teaching guests about staying away from animals and to certainly NOT touch them. Last summer we spent time in Glacier National Park. Twice, we ended up so close to mountain goats, that we could have petted them. I never would have considered touching them and would have been quite ANGRY if I saw another guest touching them.

So many bears have had to be killed, because people have feed them and petted them. In doing so, they became to used to humans and in becoming to comfortable around people,they through no fault of their own became dangerous.

People should really stop and realize that by trying to be "friendly" to wild animals you could actually be the one that gets them killed down the road.........thats not being an animal lover.........
That's right. we learned in preschool (grew up in a forest area) to never ever touch deer, especially babies. Not only because they could have rabies but also would be abandoned by their mother if they smelled like humans.

I laughed a little about the swan petting, those can be the most aggressive and meanest creatures, although they look pretty and innocent. I would never go near a swan.
My father inadvertently got too near a swan nest when water skiing once, you should have seen the mother chase him around the lake, hissing, the enormous wings spread. My father was scared of her (of course, it was a funny sight for us, to bad it was before the days of digital photography where everbody always has a camera ready).
__________________
mimmi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:13 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.