Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-04-2013, 11:15 AM   #1
nd5056
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Windy City
Posts: 954

"Khan Academy founder re-thinks schools, teaching, learning... "

Agree with him 100%

Watch the Video HERE:


Quote:
Sal Khan Learns from Bill Gates

Former hedge fund analyst Sal Khan never intended to befriend Bill Gates nor flip the typical model of education upside down by posting tutoring videos on YouTube back in 2004.

Khan, living in Boston at the time, was remotely tutoring his cousins in New Orleans and began noticing the effectiveness of uploading lessons online.

Soon enough, he developed a following and Khan eventually quit his day-job to start Khan Academy in 2008, a non-profit with a mission to create a "free world-class education for anyone anywhere." The academy's website now has a library of over 3,400 videos covering K-12 math, biology, chemistry, physics in "digestible chunks" about ten minutes long.

In 2010, he received a $2 million grant from Google and a $1.5 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. When asked what has surprised him the most about working with Bill Gates, Khan said the Microsoft founder "deeply cares" about education and teachers.

"He says, yeah, this technology is nice, we can help, the tools are nice, the data is nice. But at the end of the day, it's all about having a great teacher," Khan said.

How teachers interact with students is where Khan Academy is a game-changer. In about five to ten years, Khan said lecture-based teaching will be a relic of the past only to be found in history books.

"It's going to become mainstream for people to say, 'Why are we giving lectures in classrooms?' 'Can't we use that time to do something more human, more interactive?'" Khan said.

Some teachers have told him his videos have reversed their classrooms, as they assign the online lectures as homework, and use classroom time for hands-on learning. Khan is no stranger to the classroom. He has three degrees from MIT and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

A parent of two children in Mountain View, Calif., Khan said parents are making mistakes in two extremes.

"I think at one end of the spectrum, there's the mistake of putting it all on the teachers, putting it all on the school," he said. "I think parents should engage in the content, learn it themselves, engage with the students on it and help the teachers."

On the other end, Khan said parents are doing "too much" and over-scheduling their children."Let the students invent some stuff, create some stuff, because otherwise they're just going to create these students who are really good at performing but not that good at creating," he said.
nd5056 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 11:25 AM   #2
sam_gordon
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,354

The link didn't work for me. It said "clip not found".

My first concern though is how much time does watching these videos take? Kids are in school for 6-7 hours a day, many have another hour or two have homework, then you add another hour or so (assuming the videos are only 10 minutes for each class) of watching videos? Doesn't that qualify as "over-scheduling"?
__________________
Oasis of the Seas W. Caribbean June 8-June 15, 2013
Barcelo Maya Palace June 29-July 6, 2012
Bay Lake Towers, WDW June 1 - June 6, 2011
Polynesian, WDW Dec. 29, 2008 - Jan. 3, 2009
Wilderness Lodge, WDW, June 2005
Polynesian, WDW Sept. 7 - Sept. 14, 2001
Caribbean Beach, June 1993
sam_gordon is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 01-04-2013, 11:40 AM   #3
palmbeachmom
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 90

My son has used Khan academy website for a couple of years, whenever he needs further help on a particular concept in math. It has been incredibly helpful for him to go online while doing his homework, looking up a specific thing that he doesn't quite get, watch the quick video, and then apply it. sometimes he needs to watch it a couple of times and review some with his own notes from class, but it has been fantastic for him. He went from struggling somewhat in math because he tends to take a little longer, to really understanding things and getting A's.

It's a great resource to supplement school, but he would never just sit down every day and watch the lessons as a rule. Highly recommend it
palmbeachmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 11:46 AM   #4
Pigeon
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 7,162

The guy's not a teacher and doesn't need to deal with the reality of getting kids who don't give a damn about learning to pass the state exams. I really don't think his opinion about this sort of thing matters.

He makes videos. Some kids really find them helpful. I have a nephew who used to watch them all the time and credits them with getting through high school.

My high schooler has watched his videos, too. She finds them pretty much completely unhelpful. It is rare that there is a video that directly corresponds to what she needs to learn at the moment, and identifying the videos that might cover the right topics is time consuming. We used to really encourage her to watch Khan based on my nephew's experience. But I've watched them with her and can see the basis of her opinion.

Dh is a high school teacher. The idea that most parents are going to learn high school math and science sufficiently to teach it to their own students is frankly laughable. There are a whole lot of parents out there who can't be bothered to read to their pre-schoolers, for goodness sake. I doubt they're going to be brushing up on trig and physics any time soon.
Pigeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 11:46 AM   #5
nd5056
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Windy City
Posts: 954

Quote:
Originally Posted by sam_gordon View Post
The link didn't work for me. It said "clip not found".
Link works fine for me. Google it if it doesn't work for you.

I agree on what's in BOLD in my post, not saying TV should overtake teachers and parents' job.


.
nd5056 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 11:58 AM   #6
sam_gordon
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,354

nevermind
__________________
Oasis of the Seas W. Caribbean June 8-June 15, 2013
Barcelo Maya Palace June 29-July 6, 2012
Bay Lake Towers, WDW June 1 - June 6, 2011
Polynesian, WDW Dec. 29, 2008 - Jan. 3, 2009
Wilderness Lodge, WDW, June 2005
Polynesian, WDW Sept. 7 - Sept. 14, 2001
Caribbean Beach, June 1993

Last edited by sam_gordon; 01-04-2013 at 12:03 PM.
sam_gordon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 12:21 PM   #7
robinb
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 30,831

We have found the Khan Academy to be quite helpful in Algebra. The subjects correspond well to my DD's text book. She usually watches the videos as test prep or when she has problems with her homework. They can be hard to navigate. I wish that I could save favorite videos so I could review the videos in advance and then point her to the ones that she needs to watch.
robinb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:25 PM   #8
Wishing on a star
DIS Veteran
Another proud Southerner!
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 13,811

I am seriously going to consider trying this with my son.
Any resource that might be valid/effective at all sounds good to me!

PS: In this piece, one of the first things mentioned is how Khan is impressed with Bill Gates, due to his respect and admiration for teachers. There are classroom teachers who are using this as a tool/technique. Guess the poster above must have really missed that.... Clear and unadulterated parent-bashing. No question.
Wishing on a star is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:27 PM   #9
sam_gordon
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,354

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wishing on a star View Post
I am seriously going to consider trying this with my son.
Any resource that might be valid/effective at all sounds good to me!

PS: In this piece, one of the first things mentioned is how Khan is impressed with Bill Gates, due to his respect and admiration for teachers. There are classroom teachers who are using this as a tool/technique. Guess the poster above must have really missed that.... Clear and unadulterated parent-bashing. No question.
Question... where?
__________________
Oasis of the Seas W. Caribbean June 8-June 15, 2013
Barcelo Maya Palace June 29-July 6, 2012
Bay Lake Towers, WDW June 1 - June 6, 2011
Polynesian, WDW Dec. 29, 2008 - Jan. 3, 2009
Wilderness Lodge, WDW, June 2005
Polynesian, WDW Sept. 7 - Sept. 14, 2001
Caribbean Beach, June 1993
sam_gordon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:43 PM   #10
dhcoffey
Home inspections keep the dh busy
I'm looking for all the inspiration I can get!
 
dhcoffey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,021

Both my daughters, college and high school, have used these videos to help them when they're having problems with homework. We really like them here. I cannot do math AT ALL, lol, so it helps to have it for them.
__________________
____________________________________________


In memory of Morgan

In honor of Morgan
dhcoffey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:43 PM   #11
BrerMom


My hero, zero

 
BrerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,312

My criticism with the videos is that they always seem to focus on a math skill. Problem-solving, word problems, and understanding WHY something works is not something easily taught in a video and not usually addressed. Word problems involving multiple steps comprise almost all of the questions on the new state testing.

To me, it's very similar to the students (and parents) who seem to assume that because they can answer five multiple-choice review questions correctly, they should also earn 100% on non-multiple-choice class quiz over the same material.
__________________
Everybody's got the right to be happy. Don't stay mad; Life's not as bad as it seems.
If you keep your goal in sight, you can climb to any height. Everybody's got the right to their dreams...

Everybody's got the right to be different even though at times they go to extremes.
Aim for what you want a lot - Everybody gets a shot. Everybody's got a right to their dreams...

Everybody's got the right to some sunshine Not the sun but maybe one of its beams. One of its beams.
Rich man, poor man, black or white, pick your apple, take a bite,
Everybody just hold tight to your dreams. Everybody's got the right to their dreams...
BrerMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:59 PM   #12
Northstar
DIS Veteran
 
Northstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 1,959

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrerMom View Post
My criticism with the videos is that they always seem to focus on a math skill. Problem-solving, word problems, and understanding WHY something works is not something easily taught in a video and not usually addressed. Word problems involving multiple steps comprise almost all of the questions on the new state testing.

To me, it's very similar to the students (and parents) who seem to assume that because they can answer five multiple-choice review questions correctly, they should also earn 100% on non-multiple-choice class quiz over the same material.
I think that's the point Sal Khan is making when he says that we have to re-think what happens in actual class meetings. The point of lectures, or videos, is that they're a good starting point for learning the material, but now, in 2013, there's no reason why students and teachers need to come together in a room at the same time for this type of learning. Students can interact with videos and lectures the way they always interacted with textbooks... on their own time, at their own pace. In their pajamas with a big plate of nachos if they like!

That means that class meetings can be for problem-solving, discussion, exploring implications, analysis, skill-building based on the material that was covered in the lecture/video. Things where the students interact with each other, with the professor, and with the concepts.
__________________
Me: DH: DD: DK:
Northstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 03:00 PM   #13
PrincessKsMom

OMG you should see me when I'm driving
I'm pretty sure the minute I open my mouth no one would have to ask the question
 
PrincessKsMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 12,138

Love this website. It has helped my daughter in many areas, not just math. I also have her reviewing videos on here to help with SAT prep. And the website it highly touted by all of her teachers, from regular level classes, right up through AP. I like the fact that she can learn a concept at her own pace. If she doesn't "get it" in school, she can then supplement that with the videos where it's broken down step by step.

And I believe the website is run strictly on donations.
__________________
7/79 - Off site; 7/80 - Off site; 11/98 - Off site; 1/05 - CBR; 2/06 - ASMovies; 8/08 - ASMovies; 8/09 - CBR; 4/10 - CBR

Stolen from SCHBR'sMom, who stole it from Wickey, who stole it from Kimmar.
LETS ALL DO THE BROONY \ 0 / TagGate 2011
PrincessKsMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 03:10 PM   #14
Pigeon
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 7,162

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northstar View Post
I think that's the point Sal Khan is making when he says that we have to re-think what happens in actual class meetings. The point of lectures, or videos, is that they're a good starting point for learning the material, but now, in 2013, there's no reason why students and teachers need to come together in a room at the same time for this type of learning. Students can interact with videos and lectures the way they always interacted with textbooks... on their own time, at their own pace. In their pajamas with a big plate of nachos if they like!

That means that class meetings can be for problem-solving, discussion, exploring implications, analysis, skill-building based on the material that was covered in the lecture/video. Things where the students interact with each other, with the professor, and with the concepts.
That's nice in theory. For a certain number of highly motivated students, it might work. For the vast majority, the problem is that "Students can interact with videos and lectures the way they always interacted with textbooks..."
Pigeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 03:27 PM   #15
Northstar
DIS Veteran
 
Northstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 1,959

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pigeon View Post
That's nice in theory. For a certain number of highly motivated students, it might work. For the vast majority, the problem is that "Students can interact with videos and lectures the way they always interacted with textbooks..."
Sure, everyone (except the folks who administer that NCLB monster you've got down there in the U.S., apparently!) knows that you can't force someone to learn if they don't put in the effort.

I don't think Sal Khan is saying he's got a magic bullet that will cure the woes of the education system. Just a tool, and an idea about how technology may change how we use class time and teachers' time.
__________________
Me: DH: DD: DK:
Northstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.