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Old 09-08-2012, 08:19 AM   #1
mombrontrent
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Is the school taking this "No Peanut" thing to far?

So for years since my kids have started school (oldest in Grade 8 now) they have not been allowed peanuts or any other nuts at school. Fine, whatever I have played along with the rules. We live in Canada and for Elementary schools kids there is no lunch program, every kid either packs a lunch or walks home for lunch (which is rare).

Sometimes it was also other stuff if a student was allergic to something else. For a couple years my DS wasn't allowed anything with eggs becasue a fellow student was allergic. So no homebaked muffins, cookies ect. It was a pain. One year his TEACHER was allergic to garlic so no garlic was allowed in the classroom. Once you start reading labels you will see garlic is in almost EVERYTHING. From lunch meat to crackers to chips, no, no, nope, couldn't bring it. Their class wasn't even allowed to participate in pizza and hotdog day since there is garlic in both. My DH was irrate and thought the teacher should just keep her hands off the kids lunch but again we complied. Last year a boy in my DD class was allergic to seeds so nothing with any type of nut or seed was allowed. I bet you don't know how many products conatain sesame seeds? I do!

Anyways to get to my point my kids sent home the same letter they get every year discussing in great detail to read all labels and avoid any foods that may contain traces of peanuts ect. The parents must sign and return the form saying they will not send any peanut/nut products to school. Well this year it also included this in quote:

"Some parents have been sending products that look and taste like peanut butter but are advertised as safe to consume. Please do not send these products to school. Young children with anaphylaxis may confuse these produts with real peanut butter and become upset. Other children may take this as a sign that peanut butter is OK in their classroom and bring it to school"

Now my two DD's love to take the toasted soy nut butter and jam sandwiches to school. The jar is labled as "Safe for School" and comes with 16 little stickers to attach to the sandwich bag that lets teachers know what the product is. It is especially good for my youngest because as a vegetarian her sandwich options are limited. My DH says not to sign the form and continue to send the sandwiches. Should I contact the school and make a fuss about it? It all just seems a little ridiculous to me. It's going way over the top, it's not like their sandwich is going to make someone sick
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:25 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by mombrontrent View Post
So for years since my kids have started school (oldest in Grade 8 now) they have not been allowed peanuts or any other nuts at school. Fine, whatever I have played along with the rules. We live in Canada and for Elementary schools kids there is no lunch program, every kid either packs a lunch or walks home for lunch (which is rare).

Sometimes it was also other stuff if a student was allergic to something else. For a couple years my DS wasn't allowed anything with eggs becasue a fellow student was allergic. So no homebaked muffins, cookies ect. It was a pain. One year his TEACHER was allergic to garlic so so no garlic was allowed in the classroom. Once you start reading labels you will see garlic is in almost EVERYTHING. From lunch meat to crackers to chips, no, no, nope, couldn't bring it. Their class wasn't even allowed to participate in pizza and hotdog day since there is garlic in both. My DH was irrate and thought the teacher should just keep her hands off the kids lunch but again we complied. Last year a boy in my DD class was allergic to seeds so nothing with any type of nut or seed was allowed. I bet you ddin't know how many products conatain sesame seeds? I do!

Anyways to get to my point my kids sent home the same letter they get every year discussing in great detail to read all labels and avoid any foods that may contain traces of peanuts ect. The parents must sigh and return the form saying they will not send any peanut/nut prroduct sto school. Well this year it also included this in quote:

"Some parents have been sending products that look and taste like peanut butter but are advertised as safe to consume. Please do not send these products to school. Young children will anaphylaxis may confuse these produts with real peanut butter and become upset. Other children may take this as a sign that peanut butter is OK in their classroom and bring it to school"

Now my two DD's love to take the toasted soy nut butter and jam sandwiches to school. The jar is labled as "Safe for School" and comes with 16 little stickers to attach to the sandwich bag that lets teachers know what the product is. It is especially good for my youngest because as a vegetarian her sandwiches options are less. My DH says not to sigh the form and continue to send the sandwiches. Should I contact the school and make a fuss about it? It all just seems a little ridiculous to me. It's going way over the top, it's not like their sandwich is going to make someone sick
It is a pain, I know. But yes, you might make someone sick, or worse kill them.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:28 AM   #3
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It is a pain, I know. But yes, you might make someone sick, or worse kill them.
Please explain how I might make someone sick or kill them. The product I am sending 100% safe. Did you even read the whole post?
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:31 AM   #4
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Soy has cross-reactivity to peanuts which means that someone with a peanut allergy can also have a reaction to soy.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:34 AM   #5
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Soy has cross-reactivity to peanuts which means that someone with a peanut allergy can also have a reaction to soy.
But they never said we couldn't bring soy products to school. My youngest takes soy bologna sandwiches sometimes because she is vegetarian. Plus soy is in alot of things.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:39 AM   #6
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Please explain how I might make someone sick or kill them. The product I am sending 100% safe. Did you even read the whole post?
The school explained how in their note. Remember, these are kids. They don't get subtleties. So your kid (A) brings in soy butter. And Child B goes home and says "hey, A was eating peanut butter so I'm bringing it tomorrow.". So B brings his pb&j and eats it, and then he uses the pencil sharpener without washing his hands thoroughly. When Child C uses the sharpener later, a little peanut residue gets on her hands. Depending on her allergy, that might trigger a reaction. Or maybe it will trigger a reaction in the kids who sit next to B and C. Unfortunately, some allergies are very sensitive.

The school is covering its butt. It is unlikely that this scenario would happen, but it could, and if it was your child's life on the line, you would expect them to do their absolute best to prevent it.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:55 AM   #7
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I think it goes too far and wouldn't sign it. I wouldn't send the soy butter to school but I would let them known I 'm not happy with the policy. Maybe if enough parents voice their concerns, the policy will change. There's no way I'd sign the paper though.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:56 AM   #8
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I think it's ridiculous. Pretty soon there will be nothing left to eat. I would ask for a meeting with whoever sent the letter. It is one thing to demand that you not bring things that a child is actually allergic to, but something else to say that things that "look like " the allergen are also off limits. They've gone too far IMO.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:59 AM   #9
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I really like the way my children's school handles food allergies, especially peanut butter. Kids are allowed to bring peanut butter to school, which is all my kids would eat when they were little. As a matter of fact, the school has a weekly Chick-Fil-A meal (cooked in peanut oil). Those children who are allergic to peanuts sit at a peanut free lunch table so they do not come in contact with any peanut products while they are eating. All students in a classroom with a peanut allergy child are then walked to the restroom after they finish eating so they can scrub their hands before returning to class. This way, peanut product is not transferred from hands to desks.

I used to be the PTO president and had to put on Holiday parties for 400 students. I shopped for and purchased all the food items. Our policy for allergy kids was that we had so many different allergies (peanut, milk, egg, wheat, the list goes on) that the parents were free to check ingrediant lists on the bulk food packages the day before the party. So many allergy ingredients are listsed many different ways on ingredient lists, that they are easy to misidentify by someone not totally schooled in that allergy. If the parents did not want to check ingredient lists themselves, they sent in their own allergy safe treats to be served to their children.

I think we do need to keep allergy children safe as best we can, but I disagree with banning certain foods completely from schools.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:00 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mombrontrent View Post
So for years since my kids have started school (oldest in Grade 8 now) they have not been allowed peanuts or any other nuts at school. Fine, whatever I have played along with the rules. We live in Canada and for Elementary schools kids there is no lunch program, every kid either packs a lunch or walks home for lunch (which is rare).

Sometimes it was also other stuff if a student was allergic to something else. For a couple years my DS wasn't allowed anything with eggs becasue a fellow student was allergic. So no homebaked muffins, cookies ect. It was a pain. One year his TEACHER was allergic to garlic so no garlic was allowed in the classroom. Once you start reading labels you will see garlic is in almost EVERYTHING. From lunch meat to crackers to chips, no, no, nope, couldn't bring it. Their class wasn't even allowed to participate in pizza and hotdog day since there is garlic in both. My DH was irrate and thought the teacher should just keep her hands off the kids lunch but again we complied. Last year a boy in my DD class was allergic to seeds so nothing with any type of nut or seed was allowed. I bet you don't know how many products conatain sesame seeds? I do!

Anyways to get to my point my kids sent home the same letter they get every year discussing in great detail to read all labels and avoid any foods that may contain traces of peanuts ect. The parents must sign and return the form saying they will not send any peanut/nut products to school. Well this year it also included this in quote:

"Some parents have been sending products that look and taste like peanut butter but are advertised as safe to consume. Please do not send these products to school. Young children with anaphylaxis may confuse these produts with real peanut butter and become upset. Other children may take this as a sign that peanut butter is OK in their classroom and bring it to school"

Now my two DD's love to take the toasted soy nut butter and jam sandwiches to school. The jar is labled as "Safe for School" and comes with 16 little stickers to attach to the sandwich bag that lets teachers know what the product is. It is especially good for my youngest because as a vegetarian her sandwich options are limited. My DH says not to sign the form and continue to send the sandwiches. Should I contact the school and make a fuss about it? It all just seems a little ridiculous to me. It's going way over the top, it's not like their sandwich is going to make someone sick

makes perfect sense to me. Kids can;'t understand the difference between really PBand Jelly and look a like PB&J,

I wouldn't make any fuss over it. The school is thinking about kids lives.

I'm shocked they don't have an cafeteria. I thought all schools had to have them
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:08 AM   #11
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I think it's ridiculous on any number of fronts, chief amongst them is that it is creating a totally FALSE sense of safety. There is no way that every day every kid's lunch is going to be fully compliant. No way. Even the most well-meaning and careful adult can make a mistake. And the truth is that there is significant segment of the population who thinks allergies are bunk and will pretend to comply, but really will not to "teach" that allergies are all in people's heads.

If the allergic kids are not taught to be responsible for their own health and they are given the FALSE impression that school food is always safe, that's a tragedy waiting to happen.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:13 AM   #12
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makes perfect sense to me. Kids can;'t understand the difference between really PBand Jelly and look a like PB&J,

I wouldn't make any fuss over it. The school is thinking about kids lives.

I'm shocked they don't have an cafeteria. I thought all schools had to have them
I don't think any schools other than high schools have a cafeteria here in Canada, at least not in my experience. When I ws a kid I always brought my own lunch. For a year or two that I actually lived close enough to my school to walk home for lunch I did. They do sometimes have pizza or sub or hotdog day but my kids rarley particpate. You can bring in a couple bucks and get a slice of pizza or something on Fridays. Kids all bring their own lunches and eat right at their desks. They also get two 20 min. "nutrition breaks". They get to eat once at 10:30 and again at 1:00 both followed by 30 min outdoor recess.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:18 AM   #13
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makes perfect sense to me. Kids can;'t understand the difference between really PBand Jelly and look a like PB&J,

I wouldn't make any fuss over it. The school is thinking about kids lives.

I'm shocked they don't have an cafeteria. I thought all schools had to have them
Its not about the safety of allergic kids because they aren't allergic to soy butter. Kids with allergies need to learn how to live in a world that isn't 100% safe. If soy butter makes a kid freak out because it looks like peanut butter, that kid needs to learn the difference. Kids are so much smarter than they are often given credit for.

The excuse that it'll confuse parents and they'll start sending in peanut butter is silly. What parent is going to blindly listen to their kid and send in peanut butter because their kid says another kid had it?
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:22 AM   #14
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Maybe schools could just come up with a nice 100% allergen free daily nutrient pill and pass those out with a glass of water. They would use shatterproof glass of course because somebody might harm themselves with real glass. Or they might smash it into shards and turn it into a weapon right after they daringly flash their sign language name that incorporates a gun-like pointing finger.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:24 AM   #15
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That is taking it WAY too far! I think my kids school takes it too far and they just say no peanut butter. We can send soy butter and other nut products like nutella, just no peanuts. I get that people have allergies, but I think they need to learn how to live in a world that has their particular allergen rather than have a fake allergy free world created for them 8 hours a day 5 days a week. How do they cope other places, like the playground for instance? My kids have taken peanut butter crackers and eaten them on any number of playgounds over the years. If a child has a mild/moderate allergy the parents need to be working with them on what to avoid and how to manage it. If the child has such a severe allergy that they would literally die if they came in contact with any form of any trace of peanuts or any other allergen unfortunately that child really should not be going to school. It's sad, but there are many children who have illness' that are so severe they cannot be taught at school and need to have tutors at home. I feel children with these EXTREME allergies fall into that category. An entire of school full of hundreds of children should not have their dining choices so extremely limited for the sake of one or two kids!
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