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Old 11-14-2012, 12:02 PM   #91
sookie
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1) social skills are important.
2) if she is two years away from harvard, how do you plan on paying for it.
3) are you prepared to move in 3 months if it comes down to that? and if it is a school that you need to pay for - how do you plan on paying for that?
4) has she had educational testing to tell where she is that - gifted children tend to excel in one area or another.
5) IQ testing is helpful.


I say that if she wants to move to have her needs met - send her to boarding school.

Problem solved.
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Old 11-14-2012, 01:45 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by sookie View Post
1) social skills are important.
2) if she is two years away from harvard, how do you plan on paying for it.
3) are you prepared to move in 3 months if it comes down to that? and if it is a school that you need to pay for - how do you plan on paying for that?
4) has she had educational testing to tell where she is that - gifted children tend to excel in one area or another.
5) IQ testing is helpful.


I say that if she wants to move to have her needs met - send her to boarding school.

Problem solved.
Harvard is actually one of the cheapest schools you can go to, if you have financial need. Like a few other big-endowment schools (Yale, Princeton, etc.), their financial aid is very generous. If a family makes under $65,000, Harvard is completely free. If the family makes under $200,000, I think, they're only responsible for a portion. It's far cheaper to go to Harvard, Yale, or Princeton than many state schools--and that's one of the reasons it's become twice as competitive in the past decade.
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Old 11-14-2012, 01:52 PM   #93
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I have lots of misgivings about the OP, but some experience and questions.

I have a friend whose brother was the accelerated kid. He read at 2, went to kindergarten at 3, skipped 2nd, and started college at 15. While he was extremely bright and was among his academic peers, emotionally and socially he was way behind. He never finished college because the atmosphere there was so miserable for him. Intellectually he was on par with his classmates, he had no social life. 18 year old college freshmen don't want to socialize with 15 year olds. They have very little in common. 21 year olds who are going to clubs aren't going to include 18 year old who can't get in in their plans. While the atmosphere was intellectually stimulating, it was socially retarding. Not to mention, having been to college, I know there are experiences my 15 year old is not emotionally prepared to handle.

Same friend, her cousin's son is a profoundly gifted child. He was in public school, and they openly admitted that they couldn't meet his intellectual ability. This was in elementary school. (and this is the only child I have ever known of in real life that is truly profoundly gifted) the SCHOOL arranged for his tuition to a private school that could better meet his intellectual needs, while maintaining his emotional needs by keeping him with age appropriate peers.

Now on to the OP.

I didn't think that public schools were allowed to tell a parent that they couldn't meet their needs and leave the responsibility on the parent to find those resources. Now I am not versed in this, having woefully average children, but I thought that is why IEPs existed. I thought IEPs were designed so that the school system meets the needs of children with special needs, and I would assume that being profoundly gifted is a special educational need.

What type of employment does the OP have that she is able to pick up and move "anywhere?"

What type of employment does the OP have that she is able to afford "any" school? I know what prep schools here cost (and they are day schools) I imagine the cost of an elite prep boarding school would be even more.

I would worry about the emotional development of an adolescent that is not only willing to move away from her social group, but is actually asking to do so. I have an 11 year old and a 15 year old, and they would fight that tooth and nail.

Are the "needs" of this child ones that the school thinks that she has? If so, again, I would think that it would be their responsibility as a public school to develop an IEP to meet those needs, or are these "needs" something the OP thinks the child has and the school doesn't agree? Thus the statement "we can't meet her needs."
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Old 11-14-2012, 01:56 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by TinkerBelled View Post
Harvard is actually one of the cheapest schools you can go to, if you have financial need. Like a few other big-endowment schools (Yale, Princeton, etc.), their financial aid is very generous. If a family makes under $65,000, Harvard is completely free. If the family makes under $200,000, I think, they're only responsible for a portion. It's far cheaper to go to Harvard, Yale, or Princeton than many state schools--and that's one of the reasons it's become twice as competitive in the past decade.
This. Cost is the last thing to worry about re: Harvard.

However, again, no one, but no one, can bank on or even remotely plan on going to Harvard. It's a total lottery situation at this point. Not to mention that, honestly, for many people, there are better schools.

Don't get me wrong, friends who went loved it but there are a number of excellent, excellent schools. It's about finding the best fit. Of course, many of those are also crazy competitive, heh.
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Old 11-14-2012, 03:40 PM   #95
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Maybe the OPs daughter is, but taking algebra, biology & French in the 8th grade was normal back when I was in school & just meant you were in the top stream, not some sort of child genius!
Algebra 1 and Language 1 is the normal 8th grade curriculum in our district. Nothing special about it.
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Old 11-14-2012, 03:47 PM   #96
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If she was were she was supposed to be age wise she would be in 6th grade this year. Take into account some kids being left back she is in her math class with 15 & 16 yr olds too.
15 and 16 year ods in Algebra? That is Sophomore and Junior age. Pretty late to be taking Algebra. They should already be in Geometry with the advanced in Trig. It sounds like your school is a bit behind in academics. Now I see why you need to look for a new school.
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Old 11-14-2012, 04:57 PM   #97
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Honestly, I would talk to them about trying to add LOTS of extras into her schedule (art, woodworking, theatre, etc) and spreading t out to four years anyway--so that she gets the time to grow socially and can broaden her horizons and not focus on all academics all the time.

If she complains of boredom, let her know that sometimes life is boring AND that it is up to her to find some interesting, non academic things to have n her life--that you want her to be well rounded and that she needs to grow up emotionally at a normal rate, even if her academics are accelerated.


If the school does not have enough electives to fill the day, perhaps she can be a helper in a younger classroom some of the time and also take some art courses, etc in the community for other times. Or take some things online as well.
they really dont offer any extras to add to her schedule

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Oh I would really not encourage that! There was a 14 year old freshman in my college class and he *really* struggled socially. Academically he was fine (though from memory, he'd been on a fast track from elementary school whereas your daughter doesn't appear to be that ahead of her peers, though maybe I'm misunderstanding). He struggled to make friends - there's a massive difference between a 14 year old college freshman and an 18 year old one. I know he ended up being terribly unhappy. I'd encourage you to let your daughter slow down and enjoy her teen years in a high school, not a college environment.
I am not encouraging the 2 yr high school plan. School is suggesting this.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:07 PM   #98
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Most schools do have a police officer on staff. It doesn't mean the school is bad. Have you checked out the environment yourself? I went to a school considered dangerous to outsiders and while there were some rough kids, the bright kids were sheltered away from it all…and those schools tend to have amazing opportunities (it's whether you capitalize on them). Anyhoo…your daughter being much younger than the typical freshmen may be a problem though.
Not around here police officers are not the norm. we r very rural like seeing bears and mountian lions in our back yard, drive a half hr to go to the supermarket rural.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:26 PM   #99
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She does have same age friends that she can do some things with but they really just are not on the same level as her they dont really have the same intrests as her. They sometimes dont get her, like when she asks for more homework in class, asks for pop quizes wants to go faster in school. She wants kids that will work on science projects with her and she can talk about books with, someone who can challange her in scrable and trival persuit and race her in sudoko and crosswords.

She is involved in outside of academic activities she is in band , OM and does cross country and is looking forward to track season, she has done some drama productions and the area community band.

She hears about schools that has other courses and activities. she wants those kinds of classes.

My purpose of post where no one knows me is that you never know who knows the one piece of information you need. Some one here may know the name of the one school that would be the perfect fit for her. if you do or do not believe she is gifted or not thats ok.
I have not pushed her she skipped the grade when she was ready to, she could be already through high school if we did push her, they were ready to give her high school classesba few yrs ago, but we did it when she wanted.
She has spent her summers going to science and math camps and summer school, she already has othe rhigh school credits under her belt those are just the NYS High school regents classes she is taking now. Because that is what she wanted to do.


The school screwed up by saying they cant meet her needs, it opens them up to being financlially responsible...that is when they came up with the two yr plan. which I am not allowing.

She made a list for the school of classes that she wants to take during high school and now they r coming up with a plan to see if they can incorperate some of them.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:42 PM   #100
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I currently live in a very small town with about 250 students in K-12. There are 11 students in my DDs class that is graduating this year. It is true that there are limited resources. Some stuff just is not available that you would find in a larger school. This is our second year in this town after living in Houston, so I have seen both sides.

The advanced classes that were available in Texas just don't exist here. A few kids will take Algebra in 8th grade but most don't. My D was not able to take Calculus because it each math class is not offered every year. She started Spanish 1 in 7th grade in Texas. Here there are no foreign languages offered at all. My DD only needed to take English and History this year to finish out her graduation requirements in NM. She is a teacher aid 3-4 class periods because if she only went to school part of the day she would not get a class rank. She will have something like 24 hours of college credit from dual enrollment when she graduates this year. She hasn't taken a science class since the 10th grade because she had already taken 3 before we moved and they are the same three classes that are offered here-biology, chemistry, and environmental science.

So, it doesn't really matter how "gifted" the OPs daughter may or may not be, if the district can't offer more classes than moving to a larger district could be a very good plan.

fYI, Giftedness is not under special Ed in all states. I know for a fact that in Houston "gifted" kids do not have IEPs/ARDs (unless there is a qualifying disability) but when I was a kid in West Virginia gifted kids did have IEPs
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:43 PM   #101
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She does have same age friends that she can do some things with but they really just are not on the same level as her they dont really have the same intrests as her. They sometimes dont get her, like when she asks for more homework in class, asks for pop quizes wants to go faster in school. She wants kids that will work on science projects with her and she can talk about books with, someone who can challange her in scrable and trival persuit and race her in sudoko and crosswords.
She is involved in outside of academic activities she is in band , OM and does cross country and is looking forward to track season, she has done some drama productions and the area community band.

She hears about schools that has other courses and activities. she wants those kinds of classes.

My purpose of post where no one knows me is that you never know who knows the one piece of information you need. Some one here may know the name of the one school that would be the perfect fit for her. if you do or do not believe she is gifted or not thats ok.
I have not pushed her she skipped the grade when she was ready to, she could be already through high school if we did push her, they were ready to give her high school classesba few yrs ago, but we did it when she wanted.
She has spent her summers going to science and math camps and summer school, she already has othe rhigh school credits under her belt those are just the NYS High school regents classes she is taking now. Because that is what she wanted to do.


The school screwed up by saying they cant meet her needs, it opens them up to being financlially responsible...that is when they came up with the two yr plan. which I am not allowing.

She made a list for the school of classes that she wants to take during high school and now they r coming up with a plan to see if they can incorperate some of them.
The bolded sounds like my dd11. She fortunately has a group of friends who she calls "nerds" and they get each other. She has had many long conversations on the phone about birds! And books they have read-almost an informal book club.

DD is in a school of 909 K-6th graders.

It sounds to me like a bigger school with more options would benefit her.

I am not really sure why the responsibility to challenge DD lies on the school your DD is in.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:46 PM   #102
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So, it doesn't really matter how "gifted" the OPs daughter may or may not be, if the district can't offer more classes than moving to a larger district could be a very good plan.

fYI, Giftedness is not under special Ed in all states. I know for a fact that in Houston "gifted" kids do not have IEPs/ARDs (unless there is a qualifying disability) but when I was a kid in West Virginia gifted kids did have IEPs
No IEP for gifted children is required here. I agree with the first paragraph whole heartedly.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:51 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by cntrygal View Post
She does have same age friends that she can do some things with but they really just are not on the same level as her they dont really have the same intrests as her. They sometimes dont get her, like when she asks for more homework in class, asks for pop quizes wants to go faster in school. She wants kids that will work on science projects with her and she can talk about books with, someone who can challange her in scrable and trival persuit and race her in sudoko and crosswords.

She is involved in outside of academic activities she is in band , OM and does cross country and is looking forward to track season, she has done some drama productions and the area community band.

She hears about schools that has other courses and activities. she wants those kinds of classes.

My purpose of post where no one knows me is that you never know who knows the one piece of information you need. Some one here may know the name of the one school that would be the perfect fit for her. if you do or do not believe she is gifted or not thats ok.
I have not pushed her she skipped the grade when she was ready to, she could be already through high school if we did push her, they were ready to give her high school classesba few yrs ago, but we did it when she wanted.
She has spent her summers going to science and math camps and summer school, she already has othe rhigh school credits under her belt those are just the NYS High school regents classes she is taking now. Because that is what she wanted to do.


The school screwed up by saying they cant meet her needs, it opens them up to being financlially responsible...that is when they came up with the two yr plan. which I am not allowing.

She made a list for the school of classes that she wants to take during high school and now they r coming up with a plan to see if they can incorperate some of them.
If she obtains the sufficient number of courses to graduate, the school is not responsible for any more schooling. Once she has the required courses to graduate, they can graduate her. It's not a good idea for a 10 or 11 year old to take high school classes in summer school or regular school for that matter. It's too bad that they let her.

Here are the names of some excellent girls boarding schools: Dana Hall in Wellesley, MA, Emma Willard in Troy, NY, Miss Porter's School in Farmington, CT, Havergal College in Toronto, Canada, Bishop Strachan in Toronto, Canada. The tuition for boarding students is generally about $50000 per year. Each of the schools mentioned will have financial aid.
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:06 PM   #104
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Not sure where you are located but does your state or county offer virtual classes?
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:16 PM   #105
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Not sure where you are located but does your state or county offer virtual classes?
I was going to ask the same thing. My son took a couple of online classes. He loved them because he could plow right through them. Finished his physics class in half a year. He went through Virtual Learning Academy but I know BYU had some courses as well as a few others. Check with your guidance department.
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