Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 10-04-2012, 02:18 AM   #16
cornflake
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 6,656

Quote:
Originally Posted by tasha99 View Post
My cat was very cheap initially--$60 to a local cat rescue.

Within a couple of weeks, we spent over $1000 in vet bills because our new kitty had severe constipation. Those were some extremely expensive enemas. We also had another vet visit because it turned out our kitty develops lesions on her face when it gets too warm.

So our cat has some special needs, but her food (2 cases of Wellness canned cat food), a cat laxative given in her food daily, and a big can of pumpkin that we stir into her food, comes to about $85 per month. I buy her food from Amazon because it's cheaper than the local pet stores. We don't feed any grain based foods and no dry food because of her health problems, but I agree with the poster who said dry (and grain) are recipes for future health issues in a cat.

I realize most cats are cheaper, but keep this in mind--if you get a rescue cat, why is it there? I'm pretty sure my cat was there because she has issues. She was even bald when I got her. I thought it was because her previous owners didn't brush her, but now I realize they may have tried to give her medicine and "missed" enough to have matting from the medicine on her fur. It took me over a week to figure out I could put it in her food since I only feed her canned.
Whoa. They're there because people in this country are irresponsible and don't spay and neuter their animals, leading to a ridiculous number of animals people don't then want.

That's why people have noted that saying 'I'm thinking of getting a kitten' will lead to people offering free ones - because so many people know someone whose cat had kittens they don't want.

People are also irresponsible and put pets out, abandon them, don't care what happens, etc., leading to strays all over the place, which rescuses also take in, spay, neuter, take care of.

The idea that cats end up in shelters or rescues "for a reason" is like suggesting kids are up for adoption because there's something wrong with them. People have kids they can't take care of, they're even less responsible with their animals.
cornflake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 02:39 AM   #17
tasha99
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Oregon coast
Posts: 3,482

Quote:
Originally Posted by cornflake View Post
Whoa. They're there because people in this country are irresponsible and don't spay and neuter their animals, leading to a ridiculous number of animals people don't then want.

That's why people have noted that saying 'I'm thinking of getting a kitten' will lead to people offering free ones - because so many people know someone whose cat had kittens they don't want.

People are also irresponsible and put pets out, abandon them, don't care what happens, etc., leading to strays all over the place, which rescuses also take in, spay, neuter, take care of.

The idea that cats end up in shelters or rescues "for a reason" is like suggesting kids are up for adoption because there's something wrong with them. People have kids they can't take care of, they're even less responsible with their animals.
I guess my post was worded really badly. Of course lots of cats are in rescues and shelters because people are too irresponsible to neuter their pets. Once you start looking at older, owner released animals, though, things get more complicated. I probably shouldn't have even brought it up because the OP is looking for a kitten. (And btw, I love my kitty and wouldn't trade her for the world).
tasha99 is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 10-04-2012, 07:34 AM   #18
msjprincess
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 2,783

My cats were free from a friend of a friend. It was $65 to spay/neuter them which included vaccinations. Their yearly check-up is around $50. Food and litter costs me around $600 a year for the 2 of them.
msjprincess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 07:34 AM   #19
blueiis99
It's Disney Magic, you know!
 
blueiis99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 2,507

We found our 2 kitties on craigs list.
I had originally gotten a stray from a co- worker (kitten) and she was still so small my DD had to feed her with a baby bottle They bonded so well this cat was more like a dog. Followed her everywhere unfortunately she had feline leukemia and didn't make it a full year. I would have paid anything to keep her alive but the emergency vet said that it would be to painful for her DH. had to sign THOSE papers I couldn't
Anyway about a week later I was looking for a new infant cat my DD was so heart broken and I found a wonderful gentle man that had found 2 outside a bodega in Brooklyn they were only about 2 weeks old. He offered them for free ( he had spent a fortune already cause they were near death when he found them)
So we pack up our kitty carrier and drive into Brooklyn. It's an hr drive 1 way from our house on long island
They needed round the click care as they could not even go to the bathroom themselves
They are now adults and the best cats I could ever hope for one is attached just like the prior one to my daughter and the other is attached to me the same was. Since we became their surrogate moms.
I do have 2 others that we had purchased years prior as they are hymalaian and they to became moms. Lol. Which is strange since they are males the initial cost was vet bills. They are all indoor so it's mainly food which I get once a month. And litter my pet bill is about 100. I have 3 dogs too
__________________




Me: Jeanne DH: Jay DD 27 Sydney DD 25 Jessica DD 14 Aliyah
blueiis99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 07:49 AM   #20
skater
Change sometimes stinks.. doesn't it?
I love to hear WWII stories
 
skater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 4,537

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdoyledimou View Post
If you feed all dry, budget about $7500 for some serious operations when your pet develops UT Blockage. An all dry diet is NOT good for a cat -- not enough moisture nor protein.



Here be my babies (Master Neko (3 months) and Princess Snooki (2.5 months) -- they are Bengals.




Beautiful babies! And I mostly agree with you about the food. While its not true for every single cat, there is research that suggests food (especially the processed grains in so many dry foods) can cause these common urinary tract issues in cats. My cats get a high quality dry food (for convenience) and a lot of can food. The dry food is a necessity because we are fostering a mama cat and her kittens and she is extremely thin - so I have to have food in her bowl at all times.

Doing a google search on cat food is an eye opener. And vets don't always seem to know anything more about nutrition than what certain companies tell them - just like drug companies and doctors.
skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 09:46 AM   #21
Maridw
DisneyMom to Disneylover0105
Love to Dance
Tinkerbell Fan
 
Maridw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Originally CA, but now Panama City, FL
Posts: 2,359

Too bad you don't live near me, I have 5 kittens that we need to find homes for. We were able to find a home for one of our 6.

I agree with the previous posts - spay/neuter, shots and a basic checkup around $300 min. Don't forget to think about a flea treatment and possibly a de-worming treatment.

Do try and adopt from a shelter. I know kittens are the sweetest things and so many people want to adopt them, but maybe consider a little older cat. There are some that are really sweet and they are always the ones that get passed by.

We have one that we got from someone who was giving away free kittens and the rest of our family are all rescues. Some we started out as foster parents for and decided they were family. Others showed up at our house and adopted us. Our kittens were an accident (that won't happen again! )

We feed ours a good brand to keep them healthy, but sometimes there are other things that come up. Our mama who had kittens ended up with acute septic mastitis and almost died. 8 days, a hysterectomy and over $600 later, we got her back home.

Once you get one, they put their mark on your heart!
__________________
I Believe in Magic...
DL yearly 1969-78, Dec 99, Jul 04, Sept 06, Apr 07 FW 1972 SoG Nov 95, Jun 97, Jul 99, Nov 01 AS Sports Resort - Nov 2000; Apr & Nov 02; Mar & May 03; May & Oct 04, Apr 06 Coronado Springs Resort - Nov 03 Pop Century Mar/Apr, May, & Nov 05, Jan 06, Dec 11, Dec 12 Celebration World Resort Nov/Dec 09


It's A Girl - Natalie Grace! 4 years old now! Our dancing baby!


Maridw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 11:43 AM   #22
Gumbo4x4
Note to the ladies who forgot to check - we don't mind. Signed, "The guys"
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,616

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdoyledimou View Post
If you feed all dry, budget about $7500 for some serious operations when your pet develops UT Blockage. An all dry diet is NOT good for a cat -- not enough moisture nor protein.
Never happened with any of our cats ever, including the 16-year-old who just keeps humming along. And not to sound cruel, but for $7,500 we'd just be getting another cat.

Too bad OP isn't closer - we have a cat we need to get out of our house (sweet cat, but DD7 has terrible allergies)
__________________
Gumbo4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 11:50 AM   #23
luvmy3
When I drink I find its easier to watch my children because I see all 3 of them double, so all 6 of them of them take all my attention
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 20,034

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdoyledimou View Post
If you feed all dry, budget about $7500 for some serious operations when your pet develops UT Blockage. An all dry diet is NOT good for a cat -- not enough moisture nor protein.
OP, you don't need to count on this, plenty of cats eat nothing but dry food and live long healthy lives.
Can this happen, sure, but its not really a matter of when, just a matter of if.

Our shelter Kitty cost $60. She was actually free, that was our donation. Aside from the food, litter and occasional vet check ups, she hasn't cost us anything more than usual. Neither has the 12 year old cat we own.
luvmy3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 11:59 AM   #24
Sparkly

Then a bunch of people started commenting on it
I wondered if people really lived there and got to watch them every night
 
Sparkly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: England
Posts: 2,022

However much you pay for a kitty you get back in love and affection

I miss our cat so much. She was the most beautiful, affectionate cat ever but died of kidney failure 5 years ago Her brother died a few years before so I guess they had problems
__________________

Nov 2003, Feb 2005,Aug 2006, Apr 2008, Feb 2011, Feb 2012, Feb 2013!, Feb 2014, March 2015
Trip reports! :: Feb 2012 TR ~ PTR ~ No Faith in Google Maps, Trust and Pixie Dust! ~ Ohana Means Family, Family Means Dad is Left Behind For A Girly Trip!

Sparkly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 12:17 PM   #25
kollerbear
Mouseketeer
 
kollerbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: New York City
Posts: 237

I just wanted to add my experience with the 4 cats we've rescued in the past couple of years. We adopted from a variety of shelter situations-- Animal Care and Control, a small no-kill shelter/association, a stray off the street, and a guy who was about to give his cat up to Animal Care and Control when he was moving.

The first thing I will say is that I would never discourage ANYONE from adopting a rescue cat or kitten from ANY source, but there are advantages and disadvantages to each. When you adopt from a no-kill shelter or association (do a quick Google search to see what's in your area) they typically are willing to take their cats back if for some reason you can't keep him or her in the future. I'm not saying that you SHOULD fall back on this, but for a first time owner there is the added comfort that someone is typically vetting you, vetting the cat and making sure it's at least basically healthy, helping you make a match, and, if the match doesn't work for some reason, the cat has a safe, no-kill environment to go back to. I'm not saying you should ever RELY on this (please don't flame me), but for people who are unsure of what animal ownership REALLY entails, I'd feel most comfortable knowing I had a place to call if I had problems and needed help and advice, and this organization has COMMITTED to that animal for its life. When we've called resources about the other cats we have rescued, we've gotten a cold shoulder because there are just too many cats out their for agencies to help if they aren't their cats. I think the fact that your cat was one of theirs would be very helpful to you in getting the advice you might need from people who know.

If you're not sure that you want a pet and are uncomfortable with the prospective costs, have you considered volunteering as a foster family with a local no-kill shelter? You'd need to be available if people want to see the animal for adoption, but it could be a good way of seeing what it's like to have an animal in the home, and it's good karma. If the cat is a good match for your household, most places are comfortable with "failed fosters", or foster families who go on to adopt the animal they are fostering. They also typically cover vet costs for that foster animal if something happens while they're with you.

In terms of the actual costs of an adopted cat, they can get unexpectedly ill or injured just like any other animal or person. We've had varied experiences with vet offices before we found one that was really willing to be honest with us about balancing what the animal REALLY needed and not just piling fees up. If an office doesn't help you determine costs up front or is nasty when you ask how much procedures cost, keep looking for a new vet. We have been in and out A LOT for a variety of illnesses and routine procedures, and I won't say it's been cheap. But this is because 3 out of the 4 were not very healthy when we got them, and we had no one to ask for help since we didn't adopt them from a no kill agency.

Just because your neighbor has a very healthy cat who never needed vet care doesn't mean your cat will be as lucky, even if you feed them the exact same food and give them the same care. Accidents are less common for indoor cats. Ask your vet for advice on how to keep your cat healthy. Keeping their weight in check by watching what they eat and keeping them well hydrated by feeding even some wet food each day can go a long way towards making sure they're healthy for the length of their life. They'll need routine dental cleanings, too.

Honestly, adopting our cats has been the best thing we've ever done. They add so much joy to our lives, but we had a lot of people minimize the amount of care they demanded. I think some cats (older ones, especially) are very relaxed and easy going, but some require a lot of attention and care. It is a big responsibility but they make it all so worthwhile!!!!

Best of luck to anyone considering adopting a cat!!!
__________________
Yes, we're celebrating! ENGAGEMENT ROAD TRIP! Young and in Love: The (pre-)Trip Report!

Me (27)--> <--DF (26), Ella, Panther, Sasha, Abigail
kollerbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 12:43 PM   #26
kollerbear
Mouseketeer
 
kollerbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: New York City
Posts: 237

OH and one more thing I wish people had told us before adopting-- for some reason, male cats seem, by and large, to be much friendlier than female cats. There are exceptions to EVERY rule, of course, and this is a HUGE TREMENDOUS generalization, but all 3 of our female cats are MUCH moodier and more temperamental than our male cat. Since we're just a sample of four, I didn't think anything of it, but when we mention this to other cat owners, most have laughed and agreed with us that their male cats were their cuddle-bugs, while their female cats are more independent. (And often that's putting it nicely. I think they act like teenagers.) Just a little note that might be worth considering. I don't know WHAT we'd think about cats if we didn't have Panther to keep us sane after his sisters are done wailing on each other and whining about how tough they have it.

That having been said, urinary infections are much more critical for male cats than female cats, so be sure that they're properly hydrated and pay attention for any litter box issues that might suggest infection.
__________________
Yes, we're celebrating! ENGAGEMENT ROAD TRIP! Young and in Love: The (pre-)Trip Report!

Me (27)--> <--DF (26), Ella, Panther, Sasha, Abigail
kollerbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 12:54 PM   #27
TB'sWidow
DIS Veteran
 
TB'sWidow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: baltimore,maryland
Posts: 758

We signed up on the website Adoptapet.com over a year ago but we are looking for a puppy, I'm sure they also have kittens. We are getting our puppy on Saturday mary
__________________
TB's Widow Trips:96 dixie landings,98coranado,99offsite,02july Asm,02dec Port O,03 Poly,04Pop,06 Asmu,08 Pop,08Beach club,10 Carribean beach upcoming sept 2012 Contemporary surprise birthday trip for Dd#2
Disney Magic lives on In Memory of beloved Husband
& Father 9-16-58 to 8-8-02 Me49:Dd#1,29:Ds24,Dd#211princes s:Dsinlaw31 Dgrs#1 9Dgrs#2 7<a href="http://distickers.com/ticker/"><img src="http://distickers.com/ticker/tickers/oyw72jpwugfx50z0.png" alt="DIStickers.com Ticker" border="0"/></a>
TB'sWidow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 01:19 PM   #28
FergieTCat
No, I'm serious. And don't call me Shirley
Doug Wilson is a babe, but he can never take the place of my lust for George Clooney!
Has been known to escort squirrels across the street
 
FergieTCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Forest Hills, New York
Posts: 6,744

Quote:
Originally Posted by cornflake View Post
The idea that cats end up in shelters or rescues "for a reason" is like suggesting kids are up for adoption because there's something wrong with them. People have kids they can't take care of, they're even less responsible with their animals.
Agreeing with this.

Some animals are in rescue shelters because some people do not value the lives of other beings. That does not reflect on the animal, it reflects on the person.

That being said, this title made me laugh (no offense, OP). You could probably find a free kitten on Craigslist, but I recommend supporting a local shelter or ASPCA. As for care and upkeep, I spent about $40 a month for litter and food for Fergie (probably $60 when Diana was alive). And an annual vet visit for yearly maintenance at about $125 each. However, the return on my investment was priceless!

Your mileage may vary.
__________________
Donna

Proud recipient of the FV Crazy Cat Lady Blue Ribbon

FergieTCat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 01:25 PM   #29
Minnesota!
Shoeless in Minnesota
Has lots of rules in bed
Must have my Jelly Belly's from the Main Street candy store
I am quite spacy
 
Minnesota!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow!
Posts: 8,285

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannathy View Post
That is not a definite. Many, many, thousands of cats eat nothing but dry and do fine. Including mine and my sisters and neighbors and SIL's.

I have never had the vet say you have to feed canned! it is up to the owner what they want and can afford to feed.
All of my cats have gotten only dry - save for the occasional tuna fish - and they have all live long, happy lives. That's 7 or so cats...

Quote:
Originally Posted by kollerbear View Post
OH and one more thing I wish people had told us before adopting-- for some reason, male cats seem, by and large, to be much friendlier than female cats. There are exceptions to EVERY rule, of course, and this is a HUGE TREMENDOUS generalization, but all 3 of our female cats are MUCH moodier and more temperamental than our male cat. Since we're just a sample of four, I didn't think anything of it, but when we mention this to other cat owners, most have laughed and agreed with us that their male cats were their cuddle-bugs, while their female cats are more independent. (And often that's putting it nicely. I think they act like teenagers.) Just a little note that might be worth considering. I don't know WHAT we'd think about cats if we didn't have Panther to keep us sane after his sisters are done wailing on each other and whining about how tough they have it.

That having been said, urinary infections are much more critical for male cats than female cats, so be sure that they're properly hydrated and pay attention for any litter box issues that might suggest infection.

This has been my experience, too. All but 1 of my cats has been male. The female cat was a WITCH!!! Ooh she was nasty.
__________________


Minnesota! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 02:55 PM   #30
Pikester
DIS Veteran
 
Pikester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 5,450

Our 17 yr old kitty just passed this Summer and I was asking myself the same questions. How do we get a kitten? The HS around here is very expensive and they make you fill out paper work to make sure you are a good adoptee. I just happened to look on craigslist and saw the cutest orange tiger kitten that was 15 weeks old, was nearby, would cost me $60, had had some shots and needed to be rehomed. The young girl was so happy I got intouch with her. Their dog and the new kitten were not getting along and she felt horrible about it. I will need to pay for the little guy to be fixed in about a month or so plus yearly check ups. The food they had been feeding him is very expensive but to change it would mean going through the process of giving him the stuff he is use to and then adding some of the new stuff until he is totally eating the new. Not interested in doing that right now. So we feed him the expensive stuff for now. A small 2lb bag of Wellness Kitten food costs me $14 and a small can of moist is $1.29. Never thought I'd pay that much for cat food.

I agree about female vs male cats. Most of the male cats I had growing up were so friendly but most of the females were not.
__________________
DH Me DS16DS12


Pikester is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:11 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

You Rated this Thread: