Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Disney Trip Planning Forums > Disney Trip Reports > Completed Trip Reports
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





 
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-07-2011, 01:35 PM   #151
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709


Chapter 4: The Tale - Day 1 (Sun)

Part 6: T minus 5… 4… 3…





“Twenty seconds and counting…

T minus 15 seconds, guidance is internal. Twelve, 11, 10, 9, ignition sequence starts...

...6, …5, …4, ...3, ... 2, …1, zero, all engine running, LIFT-OFF!
We have a lift-off, 32 minutes past the hour. Lift-off on Apollo 11.”



(As spoken by NASA Public Affairs Officer: Jack King on July 20, 1969)


If you’ve never actually seen and/or heard an account of that launch, I encourage you do so. It was a scant fifteen minutes from ignition to orbit, yet it changed everything. Here’s a link to an official NASA transcript form that day with many excellent notes, commentary, and even embedded videos tucked in for good measure:

Apollo Flight Journal (Day 1, part 1: Launch)
http://history.nasa.gov/ap11fj/01launch.htm

I was seven years old at the time. The start of second grade was still a couple of weeks away. I knew what was going on… and I didn’t know what was going on. On that particular evening, I’d like to have been at least a little wiser (if not necessarily older) so that I could have truly grasped the magnitude of what was happening. But then again… I was a kid, and I looked at it all through the eyes of wonder. That right there… that “eyes of wonder” bit… that is what I love most about anything Disney.

(You did know that I’d be getting back around to Disney in a minute or two… right?)

There is just something about the Disney experience the makes me think like a kid again. To just see… to focus only on the magic of the moment and not to interrupt that moment with all the worries that are part and parcel to grown up life.



Right after the Muster, we made a quick stop by out stateroom to pick up the resort mugs we’d brought along (and to toss a splash of rum into a couple of ‘em if you know what I mean) and headed up top-side. When we hit Deck-11 things were already swinging. A dance beat was reverberating across the open decks and most folks were either in line for the Aqua Duck or congregating on the dance floor amidships. We headed back toward the beverage station to top off our cups and then and melted into the mob.



The folks on the Cruise Directors staff (with the help of several of the main characters) were up on the main stage abaft the forward funnel getting everyone up and jumping along. This is the “Sail-Away Party”! It’s like taking one of the WDW parades, compressing it into a space the size of a gymnasium, filling that space to capacity and then turning up the volume.



Interesting note: if you look close at that dance floor, you’ll notice that the pool is gone (either that of all those folks are walking… errrr… dancing on water). Actually, there is a retractable floor that covers the main pool area. Whenever extra space is needed, they just push a buttons and the pool goes bye-bye.


If you have young kids, girls of nearly any age, or are just into to jumping around in what ever manner passes for dance these days… this party is the place for you. They will keep everyone moving and singing along until the ship has pulled away form the quay. Then there is a countdown to the first sounding of the ship’s horn. It can be a lot of fun and we did stand and watched for a minute or two, but being a certifiable disaster on the dance floor it was best for all concerned that I just move on to other diversions (and my saint of a wife gladly allows me to do so). We decided to climb up to Deck-12 to get a better look-see.



The soiree was keeping things pretty crowded amidships, so we figured we’d head forward to see what all was going on in the quieter realms. Similar to the way it’s done at the parks, DCL uses music to create a sense of place. All the speaker systems are directional and there are barriers that divide the main decks into to demarked environments. When you move from one to the next, it’s like you’ve walked onto an entirely separate ship. As we continued forward, you could no longer hear the blaring dance beat and everything was much calmer.



That shot is looking toward the bow on Deck-12. Notice how the builders turned the space beneath the radar domes into covered sitting areas. That’s something I’ve not seen done before and I thought that was quite a clever use of a utilitarian necessity. Just off to the right in that picture is the enclosure for an area that is even calmer (and exclusive): the outdoor lounge for the Concierge guests. The high-end cabins are all forward on decks 11 and 12 and the entire area is only accessible by having a key card with the right amount of mojo. But… you can peek through the frosted glass to get a look at how the country club set lives (kind’a like Ralphie and the rest of the First-nighters at Higbee’s main display window all packed earmuff-to-earmuff, jostled in wonderment before a golden, tinkling display of mechanized, electronic joy!)



Well maybe it’s not all that… but clearly, affluence does buy you a little extra exclusivity (and space). OK, back to the real world… We crossed back over to the starboard side to see that one of the lifeboats had been unloaded and was being hauled away.



This was interesting because you don’t generally get to see these bad boys from that angle (which is good), but it was also a slightly disturbing site to see one them on dry land and heading away from the ship. I noticed first that it wasn’t the one that we’d been assigned to (so no worries there), and I was also calmed by the knowledge that this ship wouldn’t be leaving port if there weren’t enough boats and rafts for everyone onboard. As such, I figured they already had a backup plan in place. I’m still curious at to what might have been wrong with that one, but in any case, they loaded a new boat onboard at our next port, and no one was really the wiser.

It was just about this time that the dockworkers had finished buttoning everything up and cast off all the lines. The captain was on the wing bridge and already had the thrusters cranked up. We were moving! Sideways… but defiantly in motion. I decided to head up to the front of the observation deck and see if we couldn’t find a spot on the rail and watch as the ship started to make for open water. Luckily we did find a nice spot and settled in for the show.



As we passed by, the Freedom of the Seas gave us a fair-the-well blast of her horns. The Dream answered back with a chorus of “Be Our Guest”. You could hear the entire crowd back at the Sail Away Party through up a huge cheer at that.

Time to change gears a little bit. Just to give you an idea of the seamanship required to get a cruise ship out to sea, here’s a little map of the facilities at port Canaveral.



They first used the side thrusters on the ship to push her away from Terminal-8 and into the center of a large open area known as the “West Turning Basin”. Then the Captain started her forward into the main channel. This is also called “The Cut” as it was cut into the barrier island by the Corps of Engineers in the late 1940s and was originally intended to serve as the harbor for the Cape Canaveral missile testing facility just to the north (you can also see the Canveral Light in this one).



As we moved up the Cut, a group of Manatees gave us a slow-motion escort…



Having a pod of dolphins follow your ship out of port is generally considered to be good luck. I’m not sure of the implication implied by a manatee escort, but since the rest of the cruise was excellent by nearly any measure, I’ll be lumping that site into the good omen category as well from here on out.

As we passed by the “Middle Turning Basin” we got a closer look at the NASA Navy. Wait a minute… NASA has a navy? Well… as a mater of fact, they do. A small one to be sure, but there are several unique purpose built ships that work for our aerospace administration.





These two (MV Liberty Star and MV Freedom Star) have the job of retrieving used SRB booster rockets that are jettisoned during Shuttle Launches. The boosters land in the Atlantic





And the Retrieval ships corral ‘em and haul them back to the Cape





Then there is “The Barge”





This is used to deliver the shuttle’s massive external fuel tank. The tanks are built in Alabama at the Marshall Space Flight Center and are shipped to Canaveral via this specially built barge.





From there the tank is unloaded and trucked across the Cape Canaveral AFS and to the vehicle assemble building at the Kennedy Space Center just to the north on Merritt inland.





Here’s another shot of the barge with the KSC in the distance beyond. It’s a bit hard to make out in this picture, but you can also see the shuttle launch pads (39A and 39B) In the distance…





Well lookie there… I went and snuck in a mini bonus feature on the NASA Fleet while y’all weren’t payin’ attention (I should probably be beat for that, but I couldn’t resist)



OK… here’s another interesting site that all the dancing folks don’t generally get to see as we’re heading up the Cut…



That… is a submarine… or at least what looks like a submarine. Except that it’s on dry land and is similar to an iceberg in that you can only see the tip of it. So… is the rest of the thing buried? Nope… not quite. This is actually a monument and being as such… and being ship related… and being history related… it just might be a good candidate for a bonus feature. So… y’all just remember that you saw that there and I may well come back around to explaining the whats, whys and wherefores of that odd artifact in a little while (**insert ominous foreshadowing music here**).

And this is last thing you will see as you’re heading out of the port



Well, on the port side anyway… on the starboard side is the long pier at the corner of Jetty Park and lot of folks waving goodbye to you and the ship. Now just exactly why the Canaveral AFS has a sign posted at the entrance to the port that tell you exactly what the date and time are at the moment… I can’t say (and considering the amount of useless knowledge I have floating around in my head… that’s unusual), but there it is.

A minute or two later and we’ve cleared the port and the Florida coast is starting to recede in the distance.



In a short while, we won’t see land at all. Now that the Bon Voyage celebrations are starting to wind down, folks were starting to head back down to their cabins to get ready for the next big event… dinner. Well, actually about half of us. They serve dinner in two shifts. The folks in the first seating were off to get dressed. Those of us waiting till the late dinner seating had an array of different things we could get into, but for most (us included), there was somewhere specific destination…




…our first chance to take in a show in the main theater. I think I’ll go top off my mug and probably even drop back by the cabin for another shot of rum. Y’all just go on ahead and save me a seat, but just don’t look like you’re saving me a seat (cause that could be seen as rude). I’ll drop back by that pastry case and grab a passel of those éclairs and meet you up in the balcony and we’ll catch our first show of the cruise.






GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-07-2011, 02:06 PM   #152
FreezinRafiki
DDC 322
Cold enough for ya?
Shocking, isn't it. Oh, wait, thats a taser
 
FreezinRafiki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 5,984

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
I was seven years old at the time. The start of second grade was still a couple of weeks away.
Let's see... July 16,1969... I was ...[scribbling math-like equations on scraps of paper]... 9 years, 1 month and change away from being born. But I've read the accounts and watched the videos, so it was like I was there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post

That right there… that “eyes of wonder” bit… that is what I love most about anything Disney.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
This is the “Sail-Away Party”! It’s like taking one of the WDW parades, compressing it into a space the size of a gymnasium, filling that space to capacity and then turning up the volume.
AND GET OFF MY LAWN!

Just kidding. I'll be right in the thick of it, dancing away with the kids!
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Whenever extra space is needed, they just push a buttons and the pool goes bye-bye.
Wow, I hope they yell "everyone out of the pool!" before they hit that button.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
That shot is looking toward the bow on Deck-12. Notice how the builders turned the space beneath the radar domes into covered sitting areas.
Remember kids, don't stand next to the microwave when its on. But go ahead and stretch out and take a nap under the radar dome!


Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Just off to the right in that picture is the enclosure for an area that is even calmer (and exclusive): the outdoor lounge for the Concierge guests. The high-end cabins are all forward on decks 11 and 12 and the entire area is only accessible by having a key card with the right amount of mojo. But… you can peek through the frosted glass to get a look at how the country club set lives
Or grab a seat just out side the glass and casually and randomly flick ice cubes over the wall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
I’m still curious at to what might have been wrong with that one, but in any case, they loaded a new boat onboard at our next port, and no one was really the wiser.
About the only thing I can think of that would be wrong with a boat is "it doesn't float". (Sorry to use high tech nautical jargon there.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Having a pod of dolphins follow your ship out of port is generally considered to be good luck. I’m not sure of the implication implied by a manatee escort
Well, manatees are like really fat dolphins, and there is free food galore available 24 hours a day on the boat. So....bon appetit!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Well lookie there… I went and snuck in a mini bonus feature on the NASA Fleet while y’all weren’t payin’ attention (I should probably be beat for that, but I couldn’t resist)
Beat? Heck no! A round of Dole Whips for you, my good man!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
So… y’all just remember that you saw that there and I may well come back around to explaining the whats, whys and wherefores of that odd artifact in a little while (**insert ominous foreshadowing music here**).
Do it! Do it! Do it! I'm on the edge of my seat!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Now just exactly why the Canaveral AFS has a sign posted at the entrance to the port that tell you exactly what the date and time are at the moment… I can’t say (and considering the amount of useless knowledge I have floating around in my head… that’s unusual), but there it is.
Well, I'll go out on a limb here and say it is so people know what time it is.


Great job, Rob. Loved the pictures!
__________________
FreezinRafiki is offline  
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 09-07-2011, 02:54 PM   #153
Captain_Oblivious
DIS Dad #257
Don't underestimate your audience. I'm sure there's a fart joke in here somewhere
 
Captain_Oblivious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Delaware
Posts: 7,730

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
If you’ve never actually seen and/or heard an account of that launch, I encourage you do so.
Well, I've got Barry beat. I was only 5 years and 4 months away from being born. So that makes me...older than Barry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
But then again… I was a kid, and I looked at it all through the eyes of wonder. That right there… that “eyes of wonder” bit… that is what I love most about anything Disney.
Well said, sir. Or, in smiley language:

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
There is just something about the Disney experience the makes me think like a kid again. To just see… to focus only on the magic of the moment and not to interrupt that moment with all the worries that are part and parcel to grown up life.
Given the peanut butter I've had to put up with at work today, I needed this. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
It’s like taking one of the WDW parades, compressing it into a space the size of a gymnasium, filling that space to capacity and then turning up the volume.
Hmm. You're making me want to stay on one of the other decks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Interesting note: if you look close at that dance floor, you’ll notice that the pool is gone (either that of all those folks are walking… errrr… dancing on water). Actually, there is a retractable floor that covers the main pool area. Whenever extra space is needed, they just push a buttons and the pool goes bye-bye.
Barry's comment on this made me laugh. I'd also like to see them re-create that scene from It's A Wonderful Life when they open the pool under the dance floor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
We decided to climb up to Deck-12 to get a better look-see.
Wise move.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Similar to the way it’s done at the parks, DCL uses music to create a sense of place. All the speaker systems are directional and there are barriers that divide the main decks into to demarked environments. When you move from one to the next, it’s like you’ve walked onto an entirely separate ship. As we continued forward, you could no longer hear the blaring dance beat and everything was much calmer.
I'm convinced this is one of the things that makes Disney awesome. Life is better with a soundtrack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
But… you can peek through the frosted glass to get a look at how the country club set lives (kind’a like Ralphie and the rest of the First-nighters at Higbee’s main display window all packed earmuff-to-earmuff, jostled in wonderment before a golden, tinkling display of mechanized, electronic joy!)
Wow! They get to sit on chairs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
I’m still curious at to what might have been wrong with that one, but in any case, they loaded a new boat onboard at our next port, and no one was really the wiser.
Nobody asked you to play the violin during the rescue drill, did they?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Having a pod of dolphins follow your ship out of port is generally considered to be good luck. I’m not sure of the implication implied by a manatee escort, but since the rest of the cruise was excellent by nearly any measure, I’ll be lumping that site into the good omen category as well from here on out.
I would think manatees are a more rare sighting, so this means you got the rare "platinum-level" cruise. Unless, as is sometimes the case in Florida, the boat's propellers injured the manatees on the way out. I'm thinking that might not be as good of an omen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Well lookie there… I went and snuck in a mini bonus feature on the NASA Fleet while y’all weren’t payin’ attention (I should probably be beat for that, but I couldn’t resist)
Well, bless your nerdy little heart. As soon as I saw the pictures, I was wondering if those were the boats that picked up the rocket boosters. Cool!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
This is actually a monument and being as such… and being ship related… and being history related… it just might be a good candidate for a bonus feature. So… y’all just remember that you saw that there and I may well come back around to explaining the whats, whys and wherefores of that odd artifact in a little while (**insert ominous foreshadowing music here**).


We had fun waving to the folks on the docks as we left the port. I think we also announced to the kids that they had just left the United States for the first time in their lives. Not sure what it meant to them at their age, but it was a cool moment for DW and me.
Captain_Oblivious is offline  
Old 09-07-2011, 07:01 PM   #154
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Let's see... July 16,1969... I was ...[scribbling math-like equations on scraps of paper]... 9 years, 1 month and change away from being born. But I've read the accounts and watched the videos, so it was like I was there.
Pup!
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
AND GET OFF MY LAWN!

Just kidding. I'll be right in the thick of it, dancing away with the kids!
And of you… I’d expect no less. You and your young’ens are exactly the right folks for this party. You’ll have a ball.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Wow, I hope they yell "everyone out of the pool!" before they hit that button.
Hay… Sometimes Ya’s gott’s to take ya’ chances.
Look at it as a random thrill ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Remember kids, don't stand next to the microwave when its on. But go ahead and stretch out and take a nap under the radar dome!
Different kind of radar (no microwaves), but I believe you could always use that story to scare folks away and keep the spot for yourself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Or grab a seat just out side the glass and casually and randomly flick ice cubes over the wall.
Ooooo… Devious… I like the way you think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
About the only thing I can think of that would be wrong with a boat is "it doesn't float". (Sorry to use high tech nautical jargon there.)

Actually it’s more likely to have been something mechanical. The things are designed to stay afloat even if you fill ‘em with water, turn ‘em upside down or break ‘em in half (a comforting thing to know).

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Well, manatees are like really fat dolphins, and there is free food galore available 24 hours a day on the boat. So....bon appetit!
You may be more right then you know

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Beat? Heck no! A round of Dole Whips for you, my good man!
Thank you sir. I may have to take you up on that one some time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Do it! Do it! Do it! I'm on the edge of my seat!


Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Well, I'll go out on a limb here and say it is so people know what time it is.
Well… being as I was the one to explain just how easy it would be for you’re Holstein to smoke a cigarette in the hold of a passenger line… I’d say I deserved that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Great job, Rob. Loved the pictures!
Again… Thanks
(but you do realize that if you keep encouraging me, I’ll just keep this nonsense up, right? ).
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-07-2011, 07:12 PM   #155
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Well, I've got Barry beat. I was only 5 years and 4 months away from being born. So that makes me...older than Barry.
I repeat… Pup!

Both of ya’



Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Well said, sir. Or, in smiley language:


Given the peanut butter I've had to put up with at work today, I needed this. Thanks.
High praise indeed… Thank you sir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Hmm. You're making me want to stay on one of the other decks.
It’s a personality thing. I ain’t a big dance party person myself, but there are always quieter options somewhere on the ship.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Barry's comment on this made me laugh. I'd also like to see them re-create that scene from It's A Wonderful Life when they open the pool under the dance floor.
He coaxed a snicker out of me as well. Actually, I put some serious consideration into using the “Wonderful Life” image here, but couldn’t find a good way to fit it in at the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
I'm convinced this is one of the things that makes Disney awesome. Life is better with a soundtrack.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Wow! They get to sit on chairs!
Your right in that there really isn’t anything here that isn’t also everywhere else on the ship, other then the right to separate yourself from the rest of the rabble (which if you ask me is actually kind’a sad ).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Nobody asked you to play the violin during the rescue drill, did they?
Not so far as you know

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
I would think manatees are a more rare sighting, so this means you got the rare "platinum-level" cruise.
I like that image…

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Unless, as is sometimes the case in Florida, the boat's propellers injured the manatees on the way out. I'm thinking that might not be as good of an omen.
That image… not so much

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Well, bless your nerdy little heart. As soon as I saw the pictures, I was wondering if those were the boats that picked up the rocket boosters. Cool!
Guilty as charged… and you’re welcome.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
We had fun waving to the folks on the docks as we left the port. I think we also announced to the kids that they had just left the United States for the first time in their lives. Not sure what it meant to them at their age, but it was a cool moment for DW and me.
Every trip we take is an adventure, but the ones where we were on a ship always seemed more exotic. Even though our ports of call we’re really no more then standardized tourist destinations, the thought of being out of the country just added an extra element of wonder that you just don’t get from a typical roadside attraction.
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-08-2011, 10:20 AM   #156
afwdwfan
DIS Dad #460
You should always make room for a loophole when you need it
 
afwdwfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 10,075

Holy Schnikes! Our firewall must have been changed. I can see your pictures!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post

“Twenty seconds and counting…

T minus 15 seconds, guidance is internal. Twelve, 11, 10, 9, ignition sequence starts...

...6, …5, …4, ...3, ... 2, …1, zero, all engine running, LIFT-OFF!
We have a lift-off, 32 minutes past the hour. Lift-off on Apollo 11.”



(As spoken by NASA Public Affairs Officer: Jack King on July 20, 1969)
Is it wrong that I get goosebumps just reading that? Such a shame that US space travel is out of business for the foreseeable future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
I was seven years old at the time.
To continue with Mark and Barry's side tangent, I would have been negative 12 years, 4 months at the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
The start of second grade was still a couple of weeks away. I knew what was going on… and I didn’t know what was going on. On that particular evening, I’d like to have been at least a little wiser (if not necessarily older) so that I could have truly grasped the magnitude of what was happening. But then again… I was a kid, and I looked at it all through the eyes of wonder. That right there… that “eyes of wonder” bit… that is what I love most about anything Disney.
Well said, and a very interesting perspective on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
(and to toss a splash of rum into a couple of ‘em if you know what I mean)
You just answered the age old question. Apparently, that's why the rum is always gone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Interesting note: if you look close at that dance floor, you’ll notice that the pool is gone (either that of all those folks are walking… errrr… dancing on water). Actually, there is a retractable floor that covers the main pool area. Whenever extra space is needed, they just push a buttons and the pool goes bye-bye.
I had the same thought Mark had about this one. I wonder where that magical button is...

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
I’m still curious at to what might have been wrong with that one, but in any case, they loaded a new boat onboard at our next port, and no one was really the wiser.
Obviously you were...

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Having a pod of dolphins follow your ship out of port is generally considered to be good luck. I’m not sure of the implication implied by a manatee escort, but since the rest of the cruise was excellent by nearly any measure, I’ll be lumping that site into the good omen category as well from here on out.
I'd say one marine mammal is as good as the next.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
Well lookie there… I went and snuck in a mini bonus feature on the NASA Fleet while y’all weren’t payin’ attention (I should probably be beat for that, but I couldn’t resist)
I didn't know about the NASA Navy... very interesting.



Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
So… y’all just remember that you saw that there and I may well come back around to explaining the whats, whys and wherefores of that odd artifact in a little while (**insert ominous foreshadowing music here**).
You'd better explain it now that you mentioned it. I don't know what the Beverly it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes View Post
…our first chance to take in a show in the main theater. I think I’ll go top off my mug and probably even drop back by the cabin for another shot of rum. Y’all just go on ahead and save me a seat, but just don’t look like you’re saving me a seat (cause that could be seen as rude). I’ll drop back by that pastry case and grab a passel of those éclairs and meet you up in the balcony and we’ll catch our first show of the cruise.
Rum, free pastries, and a Disney show... There's really nothing left to say.
afwdwfan is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 09:17 AM   #157
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Holy Schnikes! Our firewall must have been changed. I can see your pictures!
Cool!

Now you don’t have to waste time reading this drivel. You can just look at the pictures and move on to the next TR.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Is it wrong that I get goosebumps just reading that? Such a shame that US space travel is out of business for the foreseeable future.
Score!
“Goosebumps” is exactly the reaction I was hopping for (cause that’s what it does to me). As such… it ain’t wrong. Unfortunately, that second sentence is also correct, and yes… shame is the word I’d use as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
To continue with Mark and Barry's side tangent, I would have been negative 12 years, 4 months at the time.
Again I say: “Pups!”
I already know that I can easily be classified as a “relic”, but sheeese…

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Well said, and a very interesting perspective on it.
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
You just answered the age old question. Apparently, that's why the rum is always gone.
Captain Jack is just going to have to get his rump down to the stores locker before me, or he’s always going to be locking down the neck of an empty rum bottle.


Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
I had the same thought Mark had about this one. I wonder where that magical button is...
Good question… I never actually saw the floor being retracted, just the obvious aftermath.
Another classic movie image that comes to mind in relation to this is the scene from “Goldfinger”, here our villain is explaining the plan for the Fort Knox heist to the room full of mobsters (of course it seemed like a waste of good money to me to put together such an elaborate presentation for a bunch of thugs who were just going to be inhaling a big ol’ lung full of “Delta-9” in a moment or two anyway).

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Obviously you were...
Yah, but… I’m really pretty much a “nobody”, so technically, my statement is still correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
I didn't know about the NASA Navy... very interesting.
Again… thanks.
I thought about throwing another 1000 words in right about here, but I think I’ll just settle for another picture on the subject instead…



Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Rum, free pastries, and a Disney show... There's really nothing left to say.
Other then: “Hay, pass me another one of those” or maybe: “Here’s mud in your eye”, I really can’t think of anything else either.
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 09:24 AM   #158
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Do it! Do it! Do it! I'm on the edge of my seat!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
You'd better explain it now that you mentioned it. I don't know what the Beverly it is.

You’re actually asking for a bonus feature?

Are you nuts?!?!

O… K… but just remember… y’all asked for it. I was going to wait until I had the last chunk of day-1 finished and post them together (so that folks could skip this next bonus feature and move on to the rest of the actual TR), but since I seemed to have raised everyone’s curiosity (not sure that three people counts as everyone, but still…) I’ll go ahead and put it up in the next post.

Let me apologize for what I’m about to do right up front. Where as some of my bonus features are spur of the moment affairs, I kind’a had this particular one planed out from the get go. It is way more info then any normal person would really want on a couple of subjects that generally elicit grand yawns form the bulk of the pop-culture majority. But… I-R-a-geek, and it is my TR (which only about three or so folks are reading anyway), so I just let my self get carried away. Actually… I did a lot of work, cutting this one down so just think… it could have been worse.


GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 09:30 AM   #159
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709



Bonus Feature 8:

Nathanael Greene







So… why is there a chunk of a former nuclear submarine sitting along the channel leading into and out of Port Canaveral?


That question is your official warning that I’m about to head off into Bonus Feature Land. For those of you who have wisely been circumnavigating my various off-topic ramblings… now is the time to implement a strategic retreat. I’d be doing it if I were you, because the consequences of remaining in the line of fire will include such atrocities as being forced to read up on pointless bits of minutia like: what exactly a strategic retreat is (and why it matters to us historically); or what kind of diabolical organization “SRP” might be (and just how that relates to those “things” sitting in “Trench-94”); or maybe even having to hear what any of this has to do with Midway (and that last one is a very tenuous connection at best)… this could get messy.


You still here?

OK… here we go, and (lucky you)… this is a two for one Bonus Feature.

What you see in that picture up there at the top of this post is a very fine watercolor depiction of the USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636), showing a rather interesting birds eye view of the sub underway. Here’s a more recent view of that ships conning tower in her current location on the grounds of the Cape Canaveral AFS (and in plain site from any ship or boat the enters or leaves the port.



It’s all that is left of a once mighty “Boomer” (well… almost all that is left). Before I tell you why it’s parked there (and why it’s almost all that’s left), I think we should first discuss why the US Navy would see fit to name a ship Nathanael in the first place. I’m sure that most of you didn’t even have to jump onto Google for this one because you already know just exactly who this Greene dude is. Well… y’all get extra special bonus points and are excused from the rest of this lesson so you can go outside and play for a while if you’d like. As for the rest of us slackers… school is now in session.

First a question: Can anyone here name a successful American Revolution War General (that did not go on to become president)? Anyone… anyone? Oh, wait… I heard someone in the back of the room… would you say that again?

Correct! This guy!



Nathanael Greene served in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. At the beginning of that conflict, he was a buck private, but he’d emerge with the reputation as Washington's most gifted and dependable officer. Yet, the dawning of a new nation would also leave him a somewhat tragic and forgotten figure.



Born the son of a Quaker family, Nathanael drew his first breath on a farm in Warwick, Rhode Island, August 7, 1742. As was often true during the period, he was mostly self-taught but was also tutored from time to time by several noted area scholars and his education maintained a heavy emphasis on mathematics and law. In 1770 Greene took over operations of the family-owned foundry in Coventry, Rhode Island. After establishing himself, he courted and married Catharine Littlefield in 1774.



A strong woman, “Caty” would find herself doing most of the work raising their five children and ultimately having to run their entire families affairs far more often then she’d have liked (she would also have a hand in completely reshaping our young nation as well but in a very different way… and I’ll get to that in a bit).

In that same year, Greene helped organize a local militia, and began to educate himself on military tactics and warfare. Shortly after the opening shots at Lexington and Concord, Nathanael was promoted from a private in his local militia to Brigadier General of the Rhode Island Army of Observation. A month after that, the Continental Congress appointed him as a brigadier for the fledgling Continental Army. As CnC, Washington then sent Greene to command forces in Boston after the Brits evacuated in March of 1776. Barely five months later, Washington would again promote Greene, this time to Major General. Nathanael would see service during most of the major battles starting with the Siege of Boston and including: Harlem Heights, Fort Washington, Trenton, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth.



When the British forces shifted their focus south and away form New England, the Congress initially appointed a number of different men to lead the southern resistance. By the summer of 1780 however, most of the south was under English control and those forces that remained were week and badly equipped. At this point, Congress decided (somewhat surprisingly) that just maybe another political choice was not exactly what was called for. Instead they entrust the appointment of the next leader in the south to Washington who immediately chose Greene.

The army Nathanael Green took charge of was exhausted, badly equipped and opposed by a vastly superior force under Lord Cornwallis. Being undeterred, he took this decided disadvantage and proceeded to continually re-prove to his British counterpart that winning a few victories, did not necessarily translate into winning a war. First Greene divided his own troops and thus forced divisions of the British as well to deal with the multiple threats. All this dividing lead to some marked successes among the smaller Continental forces including victories at Kings Mountain and Cowpens. Greene then reassembled his army in North Carolina and “retreated” toward the Virginia boarder. This is one of those moments in history where a retreat would ultimately be seen as a brilliant maneuver.

Greene's army was still out manned, and out gunned by the British, but he moved north and succeeded in staying just ahead of his adversaries while continually picking up additional troops and supplies as he went. This strategic retreat culminated when his forces crossed the Dan River into Virginia.



Cornwallis, who was determined to defeat this insignificant nuisance, would not hear of that move until late that evening. By which time the river was too high to ford, and every boat and ferry in the area was in Greene’s possession on the farther shore. A week later, Greene re-crossed the Dan River and outflanked Cornwallis forcing him into battle at Guilford Court House.



On paper, this would be a British victory, but a pyrrhic one at best. Like every “win” that Cornwallis eked out, this one cost him dearly in men and materials. The mounting losses were so great by this time that he was forced to withdraw back to the coast for reinforcements.

Several weeks later, the British forces would start moving north. Greene simply ignored them and turned south to regain control of the Carolinas. Cornwallis would be allowed to continue on into Virginia where Greene knew greater forces were congregating. Ultimately the British would end up with their backs to the water and besieged at Yorktown, a campaign that would effectively end the war. For their part, Greene’s army would fight its last battle at Eutaw Springs in South Carolina and force the remaining British regulars there to withdraw back to Charleston, where he penned them in until the end of the war.

Nathanael Greene was a singularly able and, like many other prominent leaders of the American cause, self-trained soldier. He was second only to Washington among the officers of the American army in military ability, and the only general, other than Washington and Henry Knox, to serve the entire eight years of the conflict. Like Washington, he had the great gift of using small means to the best advantage.



But the post war years were not to be kind to him. He expended his personal fortunes in support of his troops, and although he would be granted lands in both Carolinas and Georgia (and posthumously compensated), his debts were overly burdensome. He twice refused the post of Secretary of War, and chose to settle in 1785 on his Georgia estate, "Mulberry Grove," near Savannah. Here he would die tragically at only 43 years of age, a victim of sunstroke.

There’s an interesting coda to Nathanael’s story. After his death, Caty Greene needed additional help to maintain their family and new plantation. In an odd twist of history, one of the people that she hired as a tutor for her children was a young inventor named Eli Whitney. Mrs. Greene would ultimately invite him to live on property and peruse his inventions along side his appointed duties as an educator. While working at Mulberry Grove, Eli would prefect the Cotton Gin (and there is some evidence that Caty played a role in refinement of the final design). Thus the Green family not only helped create the United States, they also had a hand in completely reshaping the country’s early industry and economy.



A surprising number of places in the United States are actually named for the General. There is a either a “Greene” or “Green” county is the states of: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin. A number of cities, towns, and villages bear variations on his moniker as well including: “Greene” in Maine, New York and Rhode Island; “Greensboro” in, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania; “Greensburg” in Pennsylvania and Kentucky; “Greenville” in New York, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and South Carolina; and “Greeneville” in Tennessee.



= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =



OK, I think we’ve establish that just maybe… this fellow is a pretty good candidate for having a U.S. naval vessel name after him (well, actually this would be the third one). However, he was also an especially appropriate candidate because said vessel happened to be one of the “41 for Freedom” ships.



The Cold War arms race really began to ramp up in the late 1950s with a rapid and prolific build up of weaponry in both the eastern and western hemispheres. As part of this build up the U.S. Navy rapidly designed and launched a total of 41 new subs between 1960 and 1966. These were also a new type of vessel: Ballistic Missal Submarines. Their crews would come to call these ships “Boomers” in reference to the nuclear barbed Polaris missiles they carried and that sobriquet is still in use today. Each of these subs was named for a figure from some part of American history. This was as much a “sales tactic” as an honorarium, because (and depending on your point of view) some of the names were chosen for strategic purposes in order to help elicit as much Congressional funding for the projects as possible.







The USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636) was one of these 41 ships. Built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, she was launched on 12 May of 1964 and entered service in December of that year.



The Greene served on the front lines of the Cold War through the sixties and then received significant upgrades in dry dock between 1970 and 1971. After this refit, she returned to regular patrols in US and later in European waters.



But it’s not the exemplary service of this ship that brings her to the Cape as a static display. As with all monuments, the intention may be to celebrate good works in life, but you generally don’t do so until after a demise. On 13 March of 1986, the USS Nathanael Greene ran aground while operating in the Irish Sea. This was the first major accident involving an American Boomer. Although no lives were lost, the destruction to her lower rudders and ballast tanks was extensive. While details remain classified to this day, the damages (combined with a need to meet treaty requirements) were enough to cause the Navy to withdraw the sub from service well ahead of schedule. This image was taken during her decommissioning ceremony (The sub in the background is the USS Baltimore).



So this now begs the question: just what does one do with an unwanted “nuclear” powered navel vessel? It is not as “simple” as the current process for disposing of commercial vessels. Those are usually sold to a Ship Breaker in either India or Bangladesh, and then hauled up on a desolate beach to be slowly torn apart by desperately poor men in appalling conditions.



Google “Alang, India” sometime… it’s sad, disturbing and even grotesque at the same time and on many levels (it’s also worth its own dissertation, but these boards aren’t the place for such, so I’ll just have to put it in one of my other writings).

Nope… that process won’t do. When you’re dealing with a combination of US navel hardware and fissionable material, a far more controlled formula for handling the ship’s demise is a necessity. You need something specifically designed to deal with this situation. This is where you turn the vessel over to the “SRP” at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, WA.



When a ship enters the “Ship/Submarine Recycling Program” (SRP) the first thing that happens is that the spent fuel is removed from her reactors and shipped by rail for reprocessing at the Naval Reactor Facility in Idaho Falls. Then everything that can be reused or easily dismantled is pulled out of the hull. The next step it to cut the ship into three or four pieces.



The forward and aft crew and engine compartments will then be scraped normally although portions may be removed for preservation. Missile compartments (in the case of a Boomer) are dismantled according to the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty. This leaves the Reactor compartment. Even without fuel, this part of the ship is still considered to be a low-level radiation hazard (and rightly so). What you do with that bit is separate it and seal both ends…



…load it up on a barge…



…and ferry it up the Columbia River to the Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State.


Nice sign ehhhh…

Once arriving at this facility, the reactor compartment is moved into a storage area known as “Trench-94”.



After this space has reached its full capacity, it will be filled in with clay (but that will be some distance into the future yet). In the mean time, you can take a gander at the trench for yourself with nothing more then Google maps. It’s in plain site and currently houses the remains of 117 navel reactors (including the dormant S5W reactor that once powered the Nathanael Greene)



As the Greene was being broke up in Bremerton, her conning tower (that’s the bit that sticks up out of a submarines pressure hull and gives it that unmistakable “sub” appearance) was removed as a single piece and set aside. This is a fairly common practice when submarines are broken up, and is done for a several reasons. First, this section of the ship is easy to sever as a single unit; secondly, it rarely contains any highly contaminated areas and being the most recognizable part of the ship, many of them are preserved as monuments. That is exactly what would become of the sail from the SSBN-636 (as you’re by now clearly aware). The Naval Ordnance Test Unit (a facility within the Cape Canaveral AFS) acquired the Nathanael Greene’s conning tower assembly in 1991 with the intention of erecting a monument on the base (which is also a port where the Greene had spent part of her operational life). It was stored for some time while funds were raised to refurbish the structure and build a mounting foundation. As configured, the monument is dedicated not only to General Greene (the man, the ship and all who served in her), but also to all the subs of the original ballistic missal fleet and finally to the work done at Canaveral to test and develop those original missile systems.



To add just a little additional significance to the site, the "formal dedication" took place on June 4, 2003 in conjunction with the commemoration of the sixty-first anniversary of the "The Battle of Midway" (I said it was a tenuous link). The conning tower (and her reactor compartment) are all that remain of this once proud ship, but it is seen by hundreds of people on a daily bases as freighters, pleasure craft, and cruise ships enter and leave the port (even if most of them don’t quite know just exactly what they’re looking at).




Last edited by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes; 04-12-2013 at 09:13 AM.
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 10:05 AM   #160
Kez250
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: MVY, MA
Posts: 199

love reading TR - have just found this one and am up to chapter 2 and am loving your style of writing not to mention the pictures. Now the problem is do i read the rest of it now or do i wait a little and be patient and savor each piece of it
Kez250 is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 11:04 AM   #161
Captain_Oblivious
DIS Dad #257
Don't underestimate your audience. I'm sure there's a fart joke in here somewhere
 
Captain_Oblivious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Delaware
Posts: 7,730

That might be one of your best "diversions" yet, Rob. Having read David MacCullough's (sp?) excellent "1776", I had heard of Nathaniel Greene, but certainly not all of the details. And that watercolor at the top is so good, I thought it was a photo.

Fascinating stuff. Thanks!
Captain_Oblivious is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 11:24 AM   #162
afwdwfan
DIS Dad #460
You should always make room for a loophole when you need it
 
afwdwfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 10,075

Interesting info about Nathaniel Greene. Both the man and the sub.
afwdwfan is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 11:42 AM   #163
FreezinRafiki
DDC 322
Cold enough for ya?
Shocking, isn't it. Oh, wait, thats a taser
 
FreezinRafiki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 5,984

Revolutionary War history! Nuclear technology disposal! The cotton gin!
All neatly wrapped up in a Disney Trip Report. Well done, sir, well done.
__________________
FreezinRafiki is offline  
Old 09-09-2011, 02:15 PM   #164
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kez250 View Post
love reading TR - have just found this one and am up to chapter 2 and am loving your style of writing not to mention the pictures. Now the problem is do i read the rest of it now or do i wait a little and be patient and savor each piece of it
Well gawrsh…



Thanks and welcome to my TR, I’m very glad to have you along. If you’ve made it all the way through chapter two in one sitting, then you certainly need to take a break. If you were to continue on at that pace, dementia could set in at any moment. But… if you’re truly a thrill seeker, then you can always attempt to read my first TR (just click on the "Christmas at POR" link down there in my sig), but I’d strongly advise against it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Oblivious View Post
That might be one of your best "diversions" yet, Rob. Having read David MacCullough's (sp?) excellent "1776", I had heard of Nathaniel Greene, but certainly not all of the details. And that watercolor at the top is so good, I thought it was a photo.

Fascinating stuff. Thanks!
Quote:
Originally Posted by afwdwfan View Post
Interesting info about Nathaniel Greene. Both the man and the sub.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreezinRafiki View Post
Revolutionary War history! Nuclear technology disposal! The cotton gin!
All neatly wrapped up in a Disney Trip Report. Well done, sir, well done.
Gentlemen (and y’all know I use the term loosely), I’m not worthy… but thanks anyway.

That last one gives you a good glimpse into the random and almost haphazard way my brain works. Knowing this, can you imagining the conversations that my patent wife and teenage son have had to endure while the three of us were stuck in any of the particularly long queues for an attractions at WDW? And yet… they are willing to go back and risk that possibility again and again. This sacrifice alone is proof of the powerful and almost addictive attraction of all things Disney.

(either that or a sign of outright madness)
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
Old 09-14-2011, 01:53 PM   #165
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes
DDC 469
Never mind the Kool-Aid, don’t drink the Beverly!
If it’s still here tomorrow… I may ignore it again
 
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Along the Nation Ford, SC
Posts: 5,709

Bonus Feature 8.5 - Sub Addendum???

Well, I’ve decided to roll the next chunk of this TR up to the top of the next page (no reason… just wan’a) so I’ll be wasting this spot in the TR with the following bit of pointless gibberish...

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =



Here’s a little addendum to that last post.




There are over fifty different memorials consisting of either an entire submarine or a fragment of a former sub throughout the country. Very often, only the conning tower was preserved and this is especially true of former nuclear submarines (and for obvious reasons as you learned in my last little feature) with the memorial at Port Canaveral being one of that number. Most of these memorials are near the oceans, but a few are located more inland in cities that are either river or Great Lake ports. Then again… there are a handful of these that are not where you’d expect to find a submarine at all.



My favorite example of this is the USS Batfish (SS-310), which can be found on dry land in Muskogee, Oklahoma






Another quirky sub memorial is that of the USS Hawkbill (SSN-666). Only the tower remains of this ship but you can find it along US Highway 20 / 26 in Arco, Idaho as a display outside the Idaho Science Center.







Then there is USS Pintado (SS-387). Again only the tower remains, but this one can be found in Fredericksburg, Texas. Although Texas does certainly have a coastline, Fredericksburg, ain’t on it. It’s nearly 200 hundred miles inland west of Austin. This town is also the home of the National Museum of the Pacific War (although it obviously nowhere near the Pacific). The museums existence explains why you’ll find the fragment of that sub there, but why is the museum in Texas in the first place? Andwer: because Admiral Chester Nimitz, the supreme navel commander in the Pacific during the Second World War, was born in Fredericksburg, and his home town has strived to put together an excellent little museum to his legacy and that important time in our history.






= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =


Here are a couple of lists of the other US subs that you might encounter as you travel the country.



USN Submarines currently preserved and open to the public

USS Albacore (AGSS-569) Portsmouth, NH (Albacore Park)
USS Batfish (SS-310) Muskogee, OK (War Memorial Park and Museum)
USS Becuna (SS-319) Philadelphia, PA (Independence Seaport Museum)
USS Blueback (SS-581) Portland, OR (Oregon Museum of Science & Industry)
USS Bowfin (SS-287) Pearl Harbor, HI (USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park)
USS Cavalla (SS-244) Galveston, TX (Sea Wolf Park)
USS Clamagore (SS-343) Mount Pleasant, SC (Patriot's Point)
USS Cobia (SS-245) Manitowoc, WI (Wisconsin Maritime Museum)
USS Cod (SS-224) Cleveland, OH (downtown on the Eire lakefront)
USS Croaker (SS-246) Buffalo, NY (Buffalo-Erie County Naval & Military Park)
USS Drum (SS-228) Mobile, AL (Battleship Memorial Park)
USS Growler (SSG-577) New York, NY (Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum)
USS Ling (SS-297) Hackensack, NJ (New Jersey Naval Museum)
USS Lionfish (SS-298) Fall River, MA (Battleship Cove)
USS Nautilus (SSN 571) Groton, CT (USN Submarine Force Museum)
USS Pampanito (SS-383) San Francisco, CA (Fisherman's Wharf)
USS Razorback (SS-394) Little Rock, AR (Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum)
USS Requin (SS-481) Pittsburgh, PA (Carnegie Science Center)
USS Silversides (SS-236) Muskegon, MI (Great Lakes Naval Memorial & Museum)
USS Torsk (SS-423) Baltimore, MD (Baltimore Maritime Museum)


Fragments of USN Submarines currently preserved as memorials

USS Balao (SS-285) Washington, DC (Washington Navy Yard)
USS Boston (SSN-703) Buffalo, NY (Buffalo-Erie County Naval & Military Park)
USS Drum (SS-228) Muskegon, MI (Great Lakes Naval Memorial & Museum)
USS Flasher (SS-249) Groton, CT (Nautilus Park)
USS G.Washington (SSBN-598) Groton, CT (USN Submarine Force Museum)
USS George Bancroft (SSBN-643) Kings Bay, GA (USN Submarine Base, Kings Bay)
USS Grayling (SSN-646) Portsmouth, NH (USN Ship Yard, Portsmouth)
USS Greenling (SSN-614) Keyport, WA (Naval Undersea Museum)
USS Halfbeak (SS-352) Hackensack, NJ (New Jersey Naval Museum)
USS Hawkbill (SSN-666) Arco, ID (Idaho Science Center)
USS Kamehameha (SSBN-642) Pearl Harbor, HI (Currently in storage)
USS Lewis & Clark (SSBN-644) Mount Pleasant, SC (Patriot's Point)
USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636) Port Canaveral, FL (Port Canaveral AFS)
USS Parche (SS-384) Honolulu, HI (Naval Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor)
USS Parche (SSN-683) Bremerton, WA (Puget Sound Navy Museum
USS Pintado (SS-387) Fredericksburg, TX (National Museum of the Pacific War)
USS Roncador (SS-301) San Diego, CA (Point Loma Sub Base)
USS Squalus (SS-192) Portsmouth, NH (USN Ship Yard, Portsmouth)
USS Sturgeon (SSN-637) Keyport, WA (Naval Undersea Museum)
USS Tautog (SSN-639) Galveston, TX (Sea Wolf Park)
USS Woodrow Wilson (SSBN-624) Silverdale, WA (USN Submarine Base, Bangor)

Last edited by GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes; 09-14-2011 at 02:10 PM.
GoofyIsAsGoofyDoes is offline  
 



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

You Rated this Thread: