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Old 04-04-2011, 12:29 PM   #796
erinmomof2
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I also found core-curriculum.com and advantage curriculum. Both offer a complete curriculum for a good price. I can't find many reviews about them though. Has anyone here used it?

I am looking into putting a curriculum together on my own, but since this will be my first year that scares me a little. If I do it on my own I don't know what I would use for History and Science. Science that isn't Christian based is hard to find, or I am not looking in the right places. I am just worried I will miss something on my own, especially since I am just starting out.
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Old 04-04-2011, 01:53 PM   #797
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I also found core-curriculum.com and advantage curriculum. Both offer a complete curriculum for a good price. I can't find many reviews about them though. Has anyone here used it?

I am looking into putting a curriculum together on my own, but since this will be my first year that scares me a little. If I do it on my own I don't know what I would use for History and Science. Science that isn't Christian based is hard to find, or I am not looking in the right places. I am just worried I will miss something on my own, especially since I am just starting out.
E.D. Hirsh... "what you're x-grader needs to know"... (can either be bought or borrowed from a library) along w/ a "national standards workbook for x-grade" at any bookstore, walmart, sam's club, etc. These 2 books together and some internet use is all you need. Seriously. At least borrow the E.D. Hirsh book from the library and look through it before you go spending money on a boxed curriculum.
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Old 04-04-2011, 01:59 PM   #798
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All of the above. :-) We actually started teaching him typing last year. The majority of his writing I let him type, especially if it's a paper he's going to have to revise. That made things much better (no tears).

He can never "think of anything", even if I give him ideas. When he does get something on paper it's always very basic, no details. I try to get him to add descriptions/details and I always get "this is good, I like it this way".

He has Sensory Processing Disorder and it's difficult for him to get thru all the steps to writing. Thinking of an idea, topic sentence, ending sentence, detail sentences etc. We can talk about the idea but then when he goes to put it down it's gone. He just can't get from his brain to the paper. I think I'm looking for something like Daily Grams, where it starts out simple (like write a sentence) and gives him something small each day to learn.
Have you looked into Verticy by Calvert for the writing. You can purchase just the writing from them. It has been a life saver for my ds. This program is gold. My ds has dysgraphia and has many of the same problems as your ds. I love this program!
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Old 04-04-2011, 02:34 PM   #799
erinmomof2
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E.D. Hirsh... "what you're x-grader needs to know"... (can either be bought or borrowed from a library) along w/ a "national standards workbook for x-grade" at any bookstore, walmart, sam's club, etc. These 2 books together and some internet use is all you need. Seriously. At least borrow the E.D. Hirsh book from the library and look through it before you go spending money on a boxed curriculum.
I actually already checked that book out from the library, I love it and plan on ordering it. If I do not use a boxed curriculum my plan is to use Saxon math and Easy Grammer. I would need to find something for History and Science. I would probably work off the spelling list I have from her school now. She loves reading and reads quite frequently so I don't think I would do a formal program for that.

What I like about a boxed program is that everything would be laid out for us and since this is my first year it seems a little easier. Plus my DD likes the structure of school and I think she would like a physical textbook more than something I printed off the Internet. It is a little overwhelming with all the choices out there. Plus it seems like all the programs I like the most are too expensive. I am trying to keep curriculum below $400 and that is harder than I thought it would be. I am debating starting kindergarten with my youngest as well so I would probably need something for that too.
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Old 04-04-2011, 02:42 PM   #800
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I actually already checked that book out from the library, I love it and plan on ordering it. If I do not use a boxed curriculum my plan is to use Saxon math and Easy Grammer. I would need to find something for History and Science. I would probably work off the spelling list I have from her school now. She loves reading and reads quite frequently so I don't think I would do a formal program for that.

What I like about a boxed program is that everything would be laid out for us and since this is my first year it seems a little easier. Plus my DD likes the structure of school and I think she would like a physical textbook more than something I printed off the Internet. It is a little overwhelming with all the choices out there. Plus it seems like all the programs I like the most are too expensive. I am trying to keep curriculum below $400 and that is harder than I thought it would be. I am debating starting kindergarten with my youngest as well so I would probably need something for that too.
My son (& I) LOVE Easy Grammar! As for the math, how is your daughter in math? If she excels in math I wouldn't use Saxon. I used it for my son and he HATED it. Too much repetition. We are now using Math Mammoth and he likes that much better. Another one to look at would be Singapore, it is very similar to Math Mammoth. Saxon is a good program, it is just very repetitive and kids who "get" math don't usually care for it.

Keep in mind, just because you use a box curriculum doesn't mean that everything has to come from the same company. It's a bit more planning for you, but if you carefully think about your child's strengths/weaknesses (or likes/dislikes) it can save you a bundle of time in the long run.
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Old 04-04-2011, 02:46 PM   #801
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Have you looked into Verticy by Calvert for the writing. You can purchase just the writing from them. It has been a life saver for my ds. This program is gold. My ds has dysgraphia and has many of the same problems as your ds. I love this program!
It is an online program, or a book? It seems pricy, I'm trying to figure out if I'd have to pay that for each child, or if it's a book I could reuse, etc. It looks like something that might work, but that one component is more than all my other subjects combined.
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Old 04-04-2011, 03:05 PM   #802
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What advice will you give me?

Hi, I am a mother of a 2yr old boy and upon seeing this thread I have thought of looking into homeschooling. We are planners so we already have our eyes set on a few private or catholic schools. BUT I want to see if this is a good option for us as well. So here are my questions:

1. We both work but on different shifts so we send him part-time to daycare. Does 1 of us have to give up our job for this to work or are there folks who were able to homeschool their kids and keep their jobs?
2. Are there sites you can recommend for more information?
3. Do we need to get training?
4. Is homeschooling cheaper than private schools - approximately $4000/yr in our area?
5. Is it just one parent doing the homeschooling or both? If one, are there any dad in this thread that homeschool their kids?

I appreciate any help you can give me. TIA!
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Old 04-04-2011, 03:32 PM   #803
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My son (& I) LOVE Easy Grammar! As for the math, how is your daughter in math? If she excels in math I wouldn't use Saxon. I used it for my son and he HATED it. Too much repetition. We are now using Math Mammoth and he likes that much better. Another one to look at would be Singapore, it is very similar to Math Mammoth. Saxon is a good program, it is just very repetitive and kids who "get" math don't usually care for it.

Keep in mind, just because you use a box curriculum doesn't mean that everything has to come from the same company. It's a bit more planning for you, but if you carefully think about your child's strengths/weaknesses (or likes/dislikes) it can save you a bundle of time in the long run.
My DD is at grade level for math. She catches onto a concept quickly in many cases. Although for some reason is having the hardest time with the regrouping in addition and subtraction. I think some repitition would be okay but I do think she would get bored with too much of it. In Saxon could you just skip some of the more repetitive bits or would that be a bad idea? I looked at math u see but that didn't seem like her learning style. I think Borders sells Singapore math so I may go take a look at that. Is there a teachers guide to Singapore math or is there just the workbooks?

Also have you ever used History of the World for teaching history. I looked through it at the bookstore and it looked okay, but not sure if it was too difficult for a second grader. Other than that though I am at a loss for what to do about history. And science is even more difficult. I thought about just following the outline in What Your Second Grader Should Know, but my husband thinks we would need an actual program for science. And, since it has taken him 3 years to get on board with this I am trying to make him as happy as possible.

Thanks!
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Old 04-04-2011, 04:32 PM   #804
Nicolepa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erinmomof2 View Post
My DD is at grade level for math. She catches onto a concept quickly in many cases. Although for some reason is having the hardest time with the regrouping in addition and subtraction. I think some repitition would be okay but I do think she would get bored with too much of it. In Saxon could you just skip some of the more repetitive bits or would that be a bad idea? I looked at math u see but that didn't seem like her learning style. I think Borders sells Singapore math so I may go take a look at that. Is there a teachers guide to Singapore math or is there just the workbooks?

Also have you ever used History of the World for teaching history. I looked through it at the bookstore and it looked okay, but not sure if it was too difficult for a second grader. Other than that though I am at a loss for what to do about history. And science is even more difficult. I thought about just following the outline in What Your Second Grader Should Know, but my husband thinks we would need an actual program for science. And, since it has taken him 3 years to get on board with this I am trying to make him as happy as possible.

Thanks!
The way Saxon is set up you cannot really get rid of the repetition. Every day a new concept is introduced and then you practice a few of them. That is called Lesson practice. Then you have Mixed practice which can be ANYTHING that has been covered up to that point. It is really good for children who need a lot of repetition or they will forget, but if once they have it they remember it, it will drive them crazy.

I've never used Singapore. I'm using Math Mammoth now. Check them out, they have little supplemental books you can get if you child struggles with a concept. So they will have several books on Addition/Subtraction that practice different concepts, or mulitpication, or place value. Those aren't a stand alone curriculum (she does have that too), but they are meant for more practice for a student struggling.

Story of the World is designed for the younger child. I've never used it alone, but I did buy the CD's on Audio to supplement my sons history in 2nd grade. He LOVED them.

Honestly, science it the one area where I don't feel you need a curriculum. You can study what she's interested in. Get books to read from the library, get experiment idea on the internet and go! You can also get on of those 365 experiment books and just do some. Another one that my friend uses is the Backyard scientist. It's got fun experiments using things you have around the house. There are also a lot of fun kits available.
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Old 04-04-2011, 05:06 PM   #805
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Hi, I am a mother of a 2yr old boy and upon seeing this thread I have thought of looking into homeschooling. We are planners so we already have our eyes set on a few private or catholic schools. BUT I want to see if this is a good option for us as well. So here are my questions:

1. We both work but on different shifts so we send him part-time to daycare. Does 1 of us have to give up our job for this to work or are there folks who were able to homeschool their kids and keep their jobs?
2. Are there sites you can recommend for more information?
3. Do we need to get training?
4. Is homeschooling cheaper than private schools - approximately $4000/yr in our area?
5. Is it just one parent doing the homeschooling or both? If one, are there any dad in this thread that homeschool their kids?

I appreciate any help you can give me. TIA!

#1: I personally do not have expierance with #1. I do know people who have worked and homeschooled. Both single parents and duel income families. It will require some teamwork from both of you and totally doable

#2: HSLDA has the laws for each state broken down and easy to understand, along with groups(Christian based). There is a book that a friend loaned me to read called "Homeschooling for Dummies". A very good read. You can also look up other groups and talk with them aboout homeschooling in your area.

#3: Training, is not needed but each state has laws on the books that you most follow. HSLDA has that info.

#4: Homeschooling can be as expensive or as cheap as you want it. Depends on you and what you want to use.

#5: Again, I personally do most of the schooling, hubby is a Marine. However, I do know families where hubby was better at math and he taught that. Or because both parents worked than they shared the teaching.

There are many things to look at and the big thing is that both of you be onboard with this.
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Old 04-04-2011, 05:12 PM   #806
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#1: I personally do not have expierance with #1. I do know people who have worked and homeschooled. Both single parents and duel income families. It will require some teamwork from both of you and totally doable

#2: HSLDA has the laws for each state broken down and easy to understand, along with groups(Christian based). There is a book that a friend loaned me to read called "Homeschooling for Dummies". A very good read. You can also look up other groups and talk with them aboout homeschooling in your area.

#3: Training, is not needed but each state has laws on the books that you most follow. HSLDA has that info.

#4: Homeschooling can be as expensive or as cheap as you want it. Depends on you and what you want to use.

#5: Again, I personally do most of the schooling, hubby is a Marine. However, I do know families where hubby was better at math and he taught that. Or because both parents worked than they shared the teaching.

There are many things to look at and the big thing is that both of you be onboard with this.
Thank you! I will look up HSLDA
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Old 04-04-2011, 09:46 PM   #807
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneSparrow View Post
Hi, I am a mother of a 2yr old boy and upon seeing this thread I have thought of looking into homeschooling. We are planners so we already have our eyes set on a few private or catholic schools. BUT I want to see if this is a good option for us as well. So here are my questions:

1. We both work but on different shifts so we send him part-time to daycare. Does 1 of us have to give up our job for this to work or are there folks who were able to homeschool their kids and keep their jobs?
The question is who is going to watch your child on the day's you both work? (ie, the days he's now in daycare) If you are working when will the school happen (afternoon, weekend)
2. Are there sites you can recommend for more information?
3. Do we need to get training?
4. Is homeschooling cheaper than private schools - approximately $4000/yr in our area?
While there are online schools that can run $$$, for the most part it will be much cheaper. I spent $200-300 this year. Last year I spent $0 (Virtual Academy)
5. Is it just one parent doing the homeschooling or both? If one, are there any dad in this thread that homeschool their kids?
You can do it however you want. Sometimes parents divide up the subjects. So one parent may do Math & Science and the other History, Literature, LA. Or who ever is home does whatever is on the schedule. I personally would find that much harder because you'd miss out on the conversations and such the child had on the days you were done, but it could be done.
I appreciate any help you can give me. TIA!
Notes in red above.
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Old 04-04-2011, 10:12 PM   #808
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1. We both work but on different shifts so we send him part-time to daycare. Does 1 of us have to give up our job for this to work or are there folks who were able to homeschool their kids and keep their jobs?

Granted, my kids are older, but I work full time and homeschool. You work it in and adapt. I know some kids whose parents work and they pay another homeschool parent to supervise their child. Some let the other parent teach, others just have the kids hang out in an unschooling environment, then supplement with structure at home. The beauty of homeschooling is that you can make it fit YOUR family.

3. Do we need to get training?

You've already been training. 9 months leading up to the birth and however many years old your child is. YOU are his first teacher. YOU are the one who taught him to talk, walk, feed himself and potty. YOU are the one who has been reading to him, laying the groundwork for his own journey toward reading himself. You are already the teacher, it's just a matter of moving forward and learning, sometimes together.

4. Is homeschooling cheaper than private schools - approximately $4000/yr in our area?

Homeschooling can be free if you use the internet and the library. Or, you can spend a bundle on a curriculum. Or anything in between.

5. Is it just one parent doing the homeschooling or both? If one, are there any dad in this thread that homeschool their kids?

My hub never really helped and I'm essentially a single mom now (live 1000 miles apart). I think it's great if both can be involved, but sometimes it can lead to conflict with different learning and teaching styles. It certainly can be successful if you can find balance.
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:07 AM   #809
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I also found core-curriculum.com and advantage curriculum. Both offer a complete curriculum for a good price. I can't find many reviews about them though. Has anyone here used it?

I am looking into putting a curriculum together on my own, but since this will be my first year that scares me a little. If I do it on my own I don't know what I would use for History and Science. Science that isn't Christian based is hard to find, or I am not looking in the right places. I am just worried I will miss something on my own, especially since I am just starting out.
Have you looked into R.E.A.L. science, real science odyssey, or NEOE science? I'm not sure if they're Christian or not but those are some recommendations I've received.
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:11 AM   #810
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It is an online program, or a book? It seems pricy, I'm trying to figure out if I'd have to pay that for each child, or if it's a book I could reuse, etc. It looks like something that might work, but that one component is more than all my other subjects combined.
It is a teacher manual, Inspiration software(you install on your computer), and depending on the level a workbook "Writing Skills" by Diana Hanbury King, and some practice pages (I just photocopy them). It can be used with more than one child, you would just have to purchase the workbook, which is easy to get and cheap. They also provide help if you need it. I know the cost of $275 is insane but the teachers manual is what makes it work. I am going to use it again with my youngest ds9 next year and buy the next level for ds12. It does also have a good resale value.
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