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Old 06-06-2010, 09:18 PM   #16
slenkey
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Just a couple of thoughts...

Some of the students I work with have sensory needs as well. Some things that have worked for my kiddos include plastic Mardi Gras beads, Tangle Toys (which I think you already mentioned), clothing with different appliques on them (think iron on patches on jeans - then ask her to touch different parts of the patch as a game), play doh, and stress balls. Also, has your OT or PT used deep tissue massage with her? This may help calm her during high stress times...

Hope this helps. Have fun!!!!
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Old 06-06-2010, 11:37 PM   #17
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Sue, I've been in that part of the MonstersInc Laugh Floor before (the chained off part) when I was there last time and was with our service dog. I didn't realize that's what they considered the quiet area. It was nice being a little farther away from the big crowd, but it was very noisy.
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:08 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LockShockBarrel View Post
Sue, I've been in that part of the MonstersInc Laugh Floor before (the chained off part) when I was there last time and was with our service dog. I didn't realize that's what they considered the quiet area. It was nice being a little farther away from the big crowd, but it was very noisy.
"Quiet" meaning less people - I think I may need to be more specific.
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:11 AM   #19
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GoofyG, just wanted to send hugs your way as I truly know what you are going through. My DS(4) was diagnosed with SPD at around 3 years of age. I don't really have any great words of wisdom for Disney - just wanted you to know it WILL get better. DS has been undergoing OT for over a year now and it has helped tremendously. We still have issues and the OT has warned there may be other things down the line but with therapy DS has done a complete 180. Wishing only the best for you and your DD!
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:17 AM   #20
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GoofyG, just wanted to send hugs your way as I truly know what you are going through. My DS(4) was diagnosed with SPD at around 3 years of age. I don't really have any great words of wisdom for Disney - just wanted you to know it WILL get better. DS has been undergoing OT for over a year now and it has helped tremendously. We still have issues and the OT has warned there may be other things down the line but with therapy DS has done a complete 180. Wishing only the best for you and your DD!
Thank you! It can be very overwhelming, but i'm glad something is finally happening. I kept telling the pediatrician that something wasn't right. She has some behavorial issues too, it's crazy! She also has a speech delay due to a submucou cleft palate. She had surgery to fix it in March of this yr. She is better, but is still behind speech wise for her age. It was her speech therapist that picked up the sensory problems.
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:49 PM   #21
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That should have been our first tip off with DS. At 12 months he said no words, no gestures, nothing. Luckily our ped was proactive and we started speech therapy at around 14 months. However, I had to pursue the SPD diagsosis on my own. I knew something wasn't right so around the time my son turned 3 I called the ped and said "we need to test him for autism". Even then I had to be persistant as the doctor testing him for autism said "I am 99.9% sure he is not autistic" to which I responded "well then how to we explain" and I proceeded to list all the things which I knew pointed to SPD (as I'd already been researching). She then agreed to refer us to the school system for an OT to assess him. I have yet to hear from the school board! Anyway, I knew the school system would be slow so within 2 weeks of the doctor's initial assessment I scheduled an appointment with an OT. We know when something isn't quite right with our kids and I knew we needed to act fast as the younger the child the better the outcome with SPD (at least that is what our OT said). He is so much better now. The daily 90 minute tantrums have now almost disappeared (we still have occassional ones but not every day any more). The inability to sit still is still there but is no longer affecting him at school and really the only time I notice it now is if we are waiting in a queue or if he gets really bored. The OT uses a lap weight during our therapy sessions and I think I may need to invest in one before he starts school next year. I know we still have many challenges ahead....and are still dealing (I've only touched the surface here on the board) but he is improving every day. He is often able to find ways to calm himself on his own now which is something he could never do before therapy. I feel certain your DD is going to have great success as well. Feel free to PM me any time! It is nice to know we are not alone as it sure feels that way sometimes!
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Old 06-09-2010, 02:27 AM   #22
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I've got definite SPD - for instance, I'm freaking out right now because I'm afraid that my apartment building is going to test fire alarms this week when I'm in the building, and fire alarms are probably my worst trigger - but it's self-diagnosed. I've been to DL twice and WDW so many times I've lost count, all before the diagnosis of SPD ever existed - my last Disney trip was in August 2001. I've also got severe depression, social anxiety, a non-verbal learning disability (though not a diagnosis of NVLD that would equate to the autism spectrum), a crazy number of allergies, a congenital heart defect, a bad knee and flat feet - it's a wonder I managed to survive all my trips!

I've definitely learned to adapt, though. I'm afraid of free-fall, so I try to avoid the Tower of Terror. The last few trips, I've avoided the teacups, because while I used to love them, they now make me nauseated. When I was a child, my family would usually go to the park in the morning, go back to the on-site hotel for a rest in the afternoon, then return to the park in the evening. I still remember riding Splash Mountain at midnight in the rain. I hate being stuck in the middle of large crowds, and thankfully my traveling companions invariably want to avoid the parades as well.

My father and I managed to hit Disneyland in '97, and we hit Indiana Jones first thing in the morning as well as last thing before we left. When I was last at WDW, my friend and I rode the Rock'N'Roller Coaster, or however it's spelled, seven times in one afternoon, without a FastPass. (I'm wondering if *I'm* a sensory-seeker, because I still like upside-down roller coasters as long as I remember to take off my earrings first.)

So, feel free to PM me and I'll try to remember more tips.

(And speaking of trips, on my last vacation, I slipped on a wet floor and broke my wrist. This vacation was in April, but I went to the orthopedist two weeks ago, and now I have at least five more weeks in a thankfully waterproof cast.)
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Old 06-11-2010, 10:50 PM   #23
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Take your daughter to Guest Services on your first park day and explain that she has some sensory issues that make it difficult for her to wait in lines with a lot of other people around.

We took our two sons (age 4 and 5) to WDW for the first time in March. We live near DL, so go there often. I've NEVER used a GAC there. But, WDW was different, and "not familiar" to our boys, so it caused a LOT of anxiety and increase in behaviors that we hadn't seen for awhile.

My 4 year old has speech/language impairment and SPD, just like your DD. My older son has Autism.

We were at WDW the week before Easter. That GAC was a LIFESAVER. Oh my gosh. If it hadn't been for that, we would not have ridden anything! We would have spent the week at the hotel.

It really just allows you to NOT have to wait in the winding lines or crowded pre show areas. Some of these areas have seats, and are dark or quiet, but I assure you, my son was NOT calm and quiet. In fact, I liked that he could jump around, spin, flop on the floor, etc. while we waited for the ride. At home, at Disneyland, all he tries to do is climb the poles and hang on the chains in the lines, and it is SO difficult to keep hold of him. I still do not use a GAC at DL, as we just go when it's not crowded, so never wait more than 5 min for a ride, but I think it's essential at WDW, especially during a crowded time.

Also, SILLY PUTTY works really well as a "fidget". It's non messy, pliable, and there is a lot you can do with it. We also bought our son a set of three little Disney transport buses, and he loved holding one and spinning the wheels.

Last edited by SueM in MN; 06-13-2010 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 06-11-2010, 11:56 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brergnat View Post
Take your daughter to Guest Services on your first park day and explain that she has some sensory issues that make it difficult for her to wait in lines with a lot of other people around.

We took our two sons (age 4 and 5) to WDW for the first time in March. We live near DL, so go there often. I've NEVER used a GAC there. But, WDW was different, and "not familiar" to our boys, so it caused a LOT of anxiety and increase in behaviors that we hadn't seen for awhile.

My 4 year old has speech/language impairment and SPD, just like your DD. My older son has Autism.

We were at WDW the week before Easter. That GAC was a LIFESAVER. Oh my gosh. If it hadn't been for that, we would not have ridden anything! We would have spent the week at the hotel.

It really just allows you to NOT have to wait in the winding lines or crowded pre show areas. Some of these areas have seats, and are dark or quiet, but I assure you, my son was NOT calm and quiet. In fact, I liked that he could jump around, spin, flop on the floor, etc. while we waited for the ride. At home, at Disneyland, all he tries to do is climb the poles and hang on the chains in the lines, and it is SO difficult to keep hold of him. I still do not use a GAC at DL, as we just go when it's not crowded, so never wait more than 5 min for a ride, but I think it's essential at WDW, especially during a crowded time.

Also, SILLY PUTTY works really well as a "fidget". It's non messy, pliable, and there is a lot you can do with it. We also bought our son a set of three little Disney transport buses, and he loved holding one and spinning the wheels.
Thanks, your right about your son and my DD4. They sound alot alike, I dind't think about silly putty. I need to go find some. Some have mentioned a stroller as a wheelchair. I'm trying to decide if that will work. I know it
s going to be super crowded, and it could contain her for me in really crowded areas.

They are now going to evaluate my DS for some sensory issues. I don't know how I can do 2, I know God only gives me what I can handle. But oh it's overwhelming!
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Old 06-12-2010, 01:08 PM   #25
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First I would like to respond to GoofyG. No I am not going to yell at you just clarify a few things that are not obvious to those who do not deal with these issues on a regular basis. There are at times more then just a few people with GAC cards or such in that other line. They are there for a reason even if it is not apparent. Either they or the people with them are much more tolerent of others issues. We tend to have more empathy for the situation so it does not seem as much of a bother. As for service dogs they may help in a specific situation but they are a permanent solution. A person may not be ready to add a new member to their family just yet and that is what a service dog is. Though it is a good solution and they are wonderful it really is another family member and a permanent one not one that can be borrowed temporarily. Again I don't mean to yell or insult you either but did want to clarify.

Sue M. I don't know what we would do without your guidance sometimes. Wish we could meet you someday while visiting the world to thank you in person.

To the original poster. There is a light at the end of all this even if it seems overwhelming at times. Sometimes the stimulation they crave breeds more and can be overwhelming. I have two sn kids. The oldest is 23 now. So we have been dealing with some of these issues for awhile now. We always build some down time into each Disney day. Weather it is time at the pool, a playground or something else it does make a big difference. When in the parks most people make a beeline to see the parades at parade times. We do just the opposite. This is when we go to the popular rides with the long lines. You can almost walk right on them sometimes. We usually go the last week in April and this is considered to be a busy time in the parks also. I would recomend you get Passporters book Open Mouse for families dealing with disabities. It has alot of great info. Now if you pm me I will make a tag for your daughter. We attatch them to our kids belt loops. This is incase someone gets misplaced. I'll decorate with her favorite disney character. I put my kids names, list their disabilies , any meds they are on, our names and cell phone #s, to locate us. Also let the adults take turns with the other two. My niece is a competative gymnast also. They tent to be more disaplined. That being said give your 6yr old the job of pushing your 2yr olds stroller and keeping him entertained while waiting in line. Tell her that the other adult needs her help to do this. This way she feels important and part of the solutions and not left out. We have a third child, the reason for every gray hair I have, so we are well aquainted with this. It is very important that they feel they are not forgotten in all the chaos. Don't forget to have fun while you are there. If you are happy and enjoying yourself the kids will also. Remember you are not alone even in WDW. There are lots of us out there. Sending you lots of pixie dust.
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Old 06-12-2010, 07:07 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickey&minniealways View Post
First I would like to respond to GoofyG. No I am not going to yell at you just clarify a few things that are not obvious to those who do not deal with these issues on a regular basis. There are at times more then just a few people with GAC cards or such in that other line. They are there for a reason even if it is not apparent. Either they or the people with them are much more tolerent of others issues. We tend to have more empathy for the situation so it does not seem as much of a bother. As for service dogs they may help in a specific situation but they are a permanent solution. A person may not be ready to add a new member to their family just yet and that is what a service dog is. Though it is a good solution and they are wonderful it really is another family member and a permanent one not one that can be borrowed temporarily. Again I don't mean to yell or insult you either but did want to clarify.

Sue M. I don't know what we would do without your guidance sometimes. Wish we could meet you someday while visiting the world to thank you in person.

To the original poster. There is a light at the end of all this even if it seems overwhelming at times. Sometimes the stimulation they crave breeds more and can be overwhelming. I have two sn kids. The oldest is 23 now. So we have been dealing with some of these issues for awhile now. We always build some down time into each Disney day. Weather it is time at the pool, a playground or something else it does make a big difference. When in the parks most people make a beeline to see the parades at parade times. We do just the opposite. This is when we go to the popular rides with the long lines. You can almost walk right on them sometimes. We usually go the last week in April and this is considered to be a busy time in the parks also. I would recomend you get Passporters book Open Mouse for families dealing with disabities. It has alot of great info. Now if you pm me I will make a tag for your daughter. We attatch them to our kids belt loops. This is incase someone gets misplaced. I'll decorate with her favorite disney character. I put my kids names, list their disabilies , any meds they are on, our names and cell phone #s, to locate us. Also let the adults take turns with the other two. My niece is a competative gymnast also. They tent to be more disaplined. That being said give your 6yr old the job of pushing your 2yr olds stroller and keeping him entertained while waiting in line. Tell her that the other adult needs her help to do this. This way she feels important and part of the solutions and not left out. We have a third child, the reason for every gray hair I have, so we are well aquainted with this. It is very important that they feel they are not forgotten in all the chaos. Don't forget to have fun while you are there. If you are happy and enjoying yourself the kids will also. Remember you are not alone even in WDW. There are lots of us out there. Sending you lots of pixie dust.
Thanks for the info/ideas for my DD6 to be involved. I need to go find the book you suggested. I will pm you after I talk to her OT and see hwat all she thinks for the trip too.
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Old 06-12-2010, 09:56 PM   #27
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Sorry Goofy G. That first paragrapgh in my previous post was ment to reply to what what another person suggested. If you can't find the passporter site for the book try amazon or Barnes and noble.
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:08 PM   #28
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Sorry Goofy G. That first paragrapgh in my previous post was ment to reply to what what another person suggested. If you can't find the passporter site for the book try amazon or Barnes and noble.
No problem , I understood!

I'm going to see if the local bookstore has it. Thanks
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:42 PM   #29
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Mickeyandminnie, this isn't meant to sound defensive, but I wasn't trying to suggest that a service dog was a quick or temporary solution. I've been around them for nearly 20 years (and I'm only 24) so I know how much they're part of the family. I only mentioned it as something for the OP to possibly look into should she feel the time is right and if it was be beneficial for her daughter. Obviously it'd take time for them to establish a team of her daughter and a dog, but it could be something that would help them in years to come. Since it's new diagnosis, and probably very overwhelming, I figured I'd bring it up as an idea that maybe she hadn't considered yet.
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Old 06-13-2010, 10:02 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickey&minniealways View Post
Sue M. I don't know what we would do without your guidance sometimes. Wish we could meet you someday while visiting the world to thank you in person.

I do really love meeting people at WDW!
Doesn't happen often, but I do always try to have a lime green Mickey head on my purse with my DIS user name on it.

About the Passporter Book:
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoofyG View Post
No problem , I understood!

I'm going to see if the local bookstore has it. Thanks
You can find the book at Passporter.com or by doing a search on Amazon.com.

The current version of the book is called "Passporter's Open Mouse".
I was one of the peer reviewers for the first edition of the book, so am very familiar with it.

I do usually mention it is an excellent resource, but can look overwhelming because it is a rather large book. Keep in mind that it is covering information about everything, including the all resorts. So, there are large sections that you will be able to skip if you have already chosen your resort.
I think it is best to take in small 'doses' to start with. Just chose somewhere you would like more information about and skim through that section. Don't try to remember or note everything the first time you read it - you will quickly feel overloaded.
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