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Old 01-17-2009, 08:26 AM   #1
maroo
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Group (Family) Home for Physically Disabled

I am doing some preliminary research on group homes. But I can't seem to find any "model" for a group home situation (I am thinking more family style living environment) for someone that is disabled, but not mentally affected. I am looking to create one...

My dream is to have some sort of "big house" to be used for only a handful of people with physical disabilities. Their disabilities would be too severe to allow them to live alone and many of the people I am thinking about would live at home for the rest of their life, unless they can get a full time aide to move into an apartment, which would be quite expensive. I am thinking if we could figure out a NICE way to have them all centrally located, they could do some sharing of aides, add some volunteers to the mix, etc. Make a "home" atmosphere, but have everyone together. Maybe share a kitchen and a couple of roll in shower bathrooms, but each have a separate bedroom and a couple of dens...

Does that make sense?

Have any of you heard of anything like this?

I found lots of links to group homes for the developmentally disabled, but none for those without mental complications.

Last edited by maroo; 01-17-2009 at 12:19 PM.
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Old 01-17-2009, 09:07 AM   #2
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It makes perfect sense to me. Start of with the mentally disabled group homes as your basis then change the home to fit active physically disabled persons. It could very well work. Sue and others will have some great ideas to add. I would not call it a group home though as you would have intelligent adults who just need someone to help them a few hours a day with personal care and to have a home that is disabled friendly. I could see a bank teller or maybe a store clerk needing someone to help them a bit. I would not want to live in a group home but a community would be nice to live in.
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Old 01-17-2009, 12:18 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by mechurchlady View Post
It makes perfect sense to me. Start of with the mentally disabled group homes as your basis then change the home to fit active physically disabled persons. It could very well work. Sue and others will have some great ideas to add. I would not call it a group home though as you would have intelligent adults who just need someone to help them a few hours a day with personal care and to have a home that is disabled friendly. I could see a bank teller or maybe a store clerk needing someone to help them a bit. I would not want to live in a group home but a community would be nice to live in.
We definitely would not call it a group home! We had a name idea...but I can't remember it! Something with the word family in it.

I guess I think it just makes sense to pool resources. And no one wants to live at home with their parents forever.

My vision is of a house. Built (or renovated) to suit our needs, big shared kitchen with as many disability friendly amenities we can put in there and room for at least 4 ladies to live and possibly work ("office" space) plus 2 rooms for people that will help.

We might use an existing house that is already built out...which would make sense. ??

But definitely a "community" feel but definitely private areas to sleep and live.

Two of the people I am thinking of have to have help 24/7 (can't transfer or use their hands)...the other two are pretty independent (more of a spinal cord injury type of thing, so they can use their hands and transfer). I am thinking the people that are more independent can help each other and they can all share aides, so that they use their "hours" for paid assistants in a way that can help everyone.

Of course, from a medical billing perspective...it sounds like a nightmare for Medicaid!
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Old 01-17-2009, 04:42 PM   #4
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Maybe you could find a model if you did a search for assistive living. This would probably be the best wording for it.
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Old 01-17-2009, 05:39 PM   #5
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I know it is not what you are thinking of specifically but I wonder how a co-operative blended house would work mixing individuals with physical disabilities with individuals with social/EF challenges (HFA Aspergers). Both could benefit from giving support and being supported by the other groups.

Just a crazy aspie thought.

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Old 01-17-2009, 06:55 PM   #6
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There is place in Chicago that just opened for young adults with spina bifida. It's a small apartment building, and they all have their own apartments, with assistance on site if needed. I'll see if I can find a link for you.

Mary
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Old 01-17-2009, 07:59 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peemagg View Post
Maybe you could find a model if you did a search for assistive living. This would probably be the best wording for it.
Good idea!! Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormde View Post
I know it is not what you are thinking of specifically but I wonder how a co-operative blended house would work mixing individuals with physical disabilities with individuals with social/EF challenges (HFA Aspergers). Both could benefit from giving support and being supported by the other groups.

Just a crazy aspie thought.

bookwormde
That is a very interesting point! I have always thought of "everyone in wheelchairs"...but it could be helpful for everyone to mix it up. Very intriguing thought!

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There is place in Chicago that just opened for young adults with spina bifida. It's a small apartment building, and they all have their own apartments, with assistance on site if needed. I'll see if I can find a link for you.

Mary
Ah ha! Now, see, this is what I figured would happen if I put this on the boards...someone, somewhere, has seen this done already. This is probably more of what I was thinking...

And still blend it. Hmm.... *thinking*
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Old 01-17-2009, 10:28 PM   #8
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Here's a press release:

http://www.anixter.org/mediaroom/pre...ixvillage1.htm

There were lots of news stories about it, too.
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Old 01-18-2009, 12:27 AM   #9
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The hospital system I work for used to own an apartment building that was filled with people who were physically disabled and on ventilators. None had developmental disabilities. In order to live there, they had to be able to direct their own care. They all had their own individual apartments and there was group space (kitchen, living room area). Their aides were individual, not shared and were billed to each individual. Doing it that way allows people to have a lot of control of their care and of who their caregivers are.
The Anixter village that was linked in another post sounds like a similar concept.
In the case of the apartment building here, it was an older building that had been renovated and was on a block where all the buildings were being torn down. The people living in it were re-located to a group home for people with similar disabilities (not all group homes are for people with developmental disabilities, some are for people with physical disabilities who require a lot of care/assistance).

You could use a group home model, but go off on that in whatever way you have in mind. Group home or assisted living would give you a model for how the care is provided and paid for, since many might share care.

I have also heard of small groups of people with disabilities actually purchasing a house and living there together. I don't know much about it except that people have done it.

My sister worked for a while in an assisted living facility. Different people had different levels of need. There were several aides who were assigned to assist residents of different apartments. My niece is working in a group home and assists many clients; some need more assistance than others. As far as I know, she is paid for by the group home and the residents pay a monthly fee.
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Old 01-18-2009, 04:25 PM   #10
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Local Agencies might help

In Ohio, we have county boards for Developmental Disabilities, overseen by a state board. Ours built a beautiful new house in a local residental area. Perhaps a local board could help with the financing and development and operations of such a great concept. Maybe by working through a local agency the project could be subsidised for participating residence.Perhaps it could operate like a Ronald McDonald house, with cooperate sponsers and fundraising,with seperate quarters for a resident manager, and the bulk of the work being done by volunteers. It sounds like a great project that local churches mignt want to get involved in. I think it's a great idea. Good luck!
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Old 01-18-2009, 04:45 PM   #11
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This sounds like a great idea! I am so paranoid about what would happen if something happened to my parents. I have a trach/ventilator in addition to being fully wheelchair dependent and 24/7 tube feeds. I require 24/7 help. I would have to train my people. I have actually been searching for a nurse for over four years. Lauren is lucky to have you! UC Berkeley has a program similar to this for college students...I don't qualify because my needs are too medical.
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:19 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eternaldisneyfan View Post
This sounds like a great idea! I am so paranoid about what would happen if something happened to my parents. I have a trach/ventilator in addition to being fully wheelchair dependent and 24/7 tube feeds. I require 24/7 help. I would have to train my people. I have actually been searching for a nurse for over four years. Lauren is lucky to have you! UC Berkeley has a program similar to this for college students...I don't qualify because my needs are too medical.
I know you!! Hello! Or at least I feel like I do...

Yours was the VERY FIRST TR I ever read. In fact, you introduced me to the Disboards... so thank you, very much!!!

I actually (a year or so ago) googled something about doing Disney with a disability and your TR popped up on Google! That makes you FAMOUS!

I truly appreciate your predicament.

I enjoy helping Lauren!

We are trying to figure out what High School classes she needs to take (Advanced Placement vs. Accelerated, yada, yada)...so we are knee deep in that!!

anyway...I wanted to speak!

Nice to meet you!
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:23 PM   #13
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Most of the group homes or assisted living communities I know of are only for the developmentally disabled. Here in Florida unless someone was disabled before age 18 there is ZERO, ZIP, NONE, NADA financial assistance for independent living even if a nursing home costs more money. Duh. Someone with complex medical needs will be moved far away from their families to be housed in a place that can handle their medical needs but ignore their emotional ones. People deserve better. Most adults I know are struggling to stay alive and don't have time or energy to fight government policy that denies us a dime for or own care to live in our own homes. Kudos to the OP for thinking out of the box and trying to solve a huge problem.----Kathy
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary976 View Post
Here's a press release:

http://www.anixter.org/mediaroom/pre...ixvillage1.htm

There were lots of news stories about it, too.
Aw man!! This is PERFECT...exactly what I am thinking about...apartments would be totally cool.

And...we are actually GOING to Chicago in May with Lauren's Church Choir. So...I might could actually get a tour or something? Funny how that might work out. I will call them. Thank you so much for the info!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SueM in MN View Post
The hospital system I work for used to own an apartment building that was filled with people who were physically disabled and on ventilators. None had developmental disabilities. In order to live there, they had to be able to direct their own care. They all had their own individual apartments and there was group space (kitchen, living room area). Their aides were individual, not shared and were billed to each individual. Doing it that way allows people to have a lot of control of their care and of who their caregivers are.
The Anixter village that was linked in another post sounds like a similar concept.
In the case of the apartment building here, it was an older building that had been renovated and was on a block where all the buildings were being torn down. The people living in it were re-located to a group home for people with similar disabilities (not all group homes are for people with developmental disabilities, some are for people with physical disabilities who require a lot of care/assistance).

You could use a group home model, but go off on that in whatever way you have in mind. Group home or assisted living would give you a model for how the care is provided and paid for, since many might share care.

I have also heard of small groups of people with disabilities actually purchasing a house and living there together. I don't know much about it except that people have done it.

My sister worked for a while in an assisted living facility. Different people had different levels of need. There were several aides who were assigned to assist residents of different apartments. My niece is working in a group home and assists many clients; some need more assistance than others. As far as I know, she is paid for by the group home and the residents pay a monthly fee.
This all GREAT feedback!! Thank you so much!! I am going to compile all of this and start a committee with a few parents, etc.

I am excited that this could actually work!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouse's Shadow View Post
In Ohio, we have county boards for Developmental Disabilities, overseen by a state board. Ours built a beautiful new house in a local residental area. Perhaps a local board could help with the financing and development and operations of such a great concept. Maybe by working through a local agency the project could be subsidised for participating residence.Perhaps it could operate like a Ronald McDonald house, with cooperate sponsers and fundraising,with seperate quarters for a resident manager, and the bulk of the work being done by volunteers. It sounds like a great project that local churches mignt want to get involved in. I think it's a great idea. Good luck!
I don't know of any county board here...but I need to check on that.

All of that sounds so awesome!!
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Old 01-19-2009, 04:47 AM   #15
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i'll pass on some info. you might want to research-

check how your state defines different adult housing situations. in ours if a person provides certain types of "care", room and board for adults it requires licensing. then depending on the number of people there are different designations for what the place is (an adult family home vs a group home vs a boarding home....). one of the big issues with this can be the zoning in a particular area-as well as cc&r's (if applicable). adult family homes in our state are permitted in residential neighborhoods, the other categories are not. in some areas with cc&r's there are rules prohibiting operating buisnesses-and adult family home's require a buisness lic. in our state so hoa's have been sucessful in blocking them.

if it's strictly a situation where you would be renting rooms and the residents would contract their own providers then you have to look at zoning as well. some residental neighborhoods are zoned as strictly single family homes and operating a multi renter housing arrangement can be illegal (was in the neighborhood we used to live in).

in either case educate yourself on federal and local fair housing laws-you can (for lack of a better word) "market' yourself to the type of disabiling conditions you prefer to serve, but you may be in violation of fhl if someone applies for a vacancy and you turn them down based on their not being of the disabling nature you prefer (this can be downright nasty-there's a couple of cases of housing discrimination going on right now where soon to be paroled sexual offenders have made a point of applying to group/adult family homes that serve the disabled. they are to some extent successfully arguing that in some jurisdictions 'sexual addiction' is designated as a disability and that the property owners refusal to rent to them violates fhl

you might also want to familiarize yourself with food stamp regulations. there's a fairly good population of disabled that are in receipt of them and there are definate ways you would need to set up the purchasing/preparing/storage of meals to either retain a resident's eligibility or not disadvantage them (5 separate people get more food stamps than 5 people who are required to be mingled into the same 'food stamp household').


just to give you an idea of some kinds of assited living-i can tell you what was available to us where my mom lives (northern california). she's pretty much what you described-physical disabilities such she could'nt live alone anymore but nowhere near to needing f/t nursing care.

we found she could move into an adult family home or a 'board and care home'. both were required by ca to be lic. because the staff helped with some things, people generaly did'nt have outside aids-it was all provided by the on-site or contracted by the facility/home owners. the option we went with was an assisted living center. the place is basicly like a hotel (individual apartments but all in one building and accessed by a main entry). the place provides to ALL residents housekeeping (once a week), laundering of sheets/towels (once per week), and 3 meals per day-group dining at set times served to your table. this is the base rate if you require no 'assisted services'. if you require assisted services you use your own provider (they have an agency to refer you to or you can get your own) and the providers and the resident handle all the financial issues independant of the facility (the place she lived previously had their own staff and assistive services were done in 'tiers', so even if you only needed one area of assistance from tier 1 you paid for that entire tier-and it got progressivly more expensive as you progressed through the tiers, it's much more reasonable where she is now and can pay for exactly what she needs-nothing more). the nice thing about where she lives now is unless she required full time nursing care she can stay their for the remainder of her life-they have an arrangement with hospice should that be necessary as well).


good luck-sounds like a great idea.
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